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Old July 9th, 2010, 09:21 AM   #1
Mike Covell
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Default Deeming in the New Zealand Press

The New Zealand newspaper's appeared to collect their stories from three sources. There own correspondents, the Australian press, and the London press.

The following is a blow by blow account of the stories that made it into the New Zealand Press. Grammer and spelling remains true to the actual reports. I will place them here in chronological order starting with earliest first.
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Old July 9th, 2010, 09:22 AM   #2
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Wanganui Herald, 19th March 1892

Career of the Murderer.
A Fearful Catalogue of Crime.
Further Investigations and Horrors.
(By Electric Telegraph— Copyright.)
(Per United Press Association).
London, March 17.
Enquiries prosecuted by the police, show that Frederick Deeming, alias Williams. was born near London. He served as a steward in various sailing ships during the early part of his life and in 1881 married woman, Mary James at Birkenhead. They had two children, Bertha and Mary, born in Sydney; and a boy named Sydney, born at sea. Williams returned to England in 1890 and a baby named Leila was born it Birkenhead. The bodies found at Rainhill are the bodies of the wife and children. A copybook found in the house bears the name of Bertha Deeming. It has been ascertained that another woman is missing who was last seen in Williams' company in 1890. Deeming, under the name of Harry Lawson, an Australian farmer, lodged with Mrs Matheson, of Beverley, and married her daughter in May of that year. Ho gave her a large quantity of jewellery, but afterwards decamped, and eventually deserted her at Hull, at the end of the honeymoon, and took away with him the jewellery lie had given her. The articles had been obtained from local tradesmen under false pretences, and a warrant was issued against Lawson, who was arrested in Uruguay and extradited to Hull where he was imprisoned on the charge for nine months. During the proceedings it came out that he had been already married at Birkenhead. Williams was released last July, and many robberies occurred in the vicinity of Rainhill and St. Helens last year, From the position in which the bodies ware found it is supposed that cement wm poured on them wet. The police are now digging in the pantry, which also hears traces of being newly cemented. It is believed that the heavy luggage Williams is known to have sent away contained the blood-stained clothes of his victims. It is supposed the murders were committed on August 10, a few days after the villa was rented.
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Old July 9th, 2010, 09:23 AM   #3
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Grey River Argus, 22 March 1892
Marlborough Express, 21 March 1892

THE FIEND DEEMING.
(PER PRESS ASSOCIATION.)
[by electric telegraph-— copyright.!
(Received March 20, at 6 p m.) London, March 18. At the inquest on the remains of the victims of the man Williams Albert Deeming gave evidence to the effect that seven months ago he had a dream that his sister-in-law and her children had been murdered. His statement caused a sensation. At the funeral which took place at Rainhill 1000 people were present. The. clothes discovered at Plymouth included much belonging to the children, including their toys. The large box is still missing. In tie House of Commons to-day the Right Hon H. Mathers, Secretary of State for the Home Department, in reply to a question declared that active negotiations are taking pace between the Lancashire police and those in Australia with regard to the man Williams. The inquest will probably result in a verdict of murder completing the case in every respect. If the prosecution fails in Melbourne Deeming will be brought here to stand his trial on the capital charge. It has been discovered that during his courting at Beverley Williams, who was then travelling on the name of Harry Lawson, an Australian, found it" necessary to make a trip to Antwerp, where he met with an accident. Mrs Matheson and her daughter (the latter was engaged to Williams) nursed him through his illness, and after his recovery the wedding was celebrated, the honeymoon being spent at Bournemouth, a town in the County of Hants, six miles by rail west by south of Christchurch. Subsequently the bride and bridegroom returned to the Station Hotel in Hull, where one morning Deeming left the hotel on the pretence of making a call on some friends, but he never returned. The inquest has been adjourned for a week. London, March 19. Further enquiries by the police elicit the fact that Mary James and her slater Martha, servants at Birkenhead and Pembroke, married Frederick and Albert Deeming respectively. Mary was a short dark woman, bearing a resemblance to one of the bodies recovered. The Hull police have identified the portrait of Williams with the man who passed under the assumed name of H. Lawson, and who married Miss Matheson. When in person Williams stated that he was separated from his wife at Birkenhead and that he had several nuggets of gold in a distant town. He attempted to bribe the gaol officers, and he appeared to be a man of such determination and great resource that the governor of the gaol refused to allow him to work in the open air, and Williams was repeatedly shifted from one cell to another and closely watched. He stated to the officials that he had travelled over the world, Australia, America, Africa, and was even a greater traveller than Stanley. The governor of, the gaol considering him to be a daring and ingenious scamp, caused a portrait of him to be taken before he left Hull prison. A Masonic costume and many clothes found at Plymouth are marked Deeming. Deeming left many portmanteaus at Birkenhead, Pull, and Rainhill, and these are believed to be the spoil of several robberies and burglaries. At the inquest, Albert Deeming stated that he last saw his brother Frederick and wife in July. He understood at the time that they were going to Rainhill for a few days, and thence to California a fortnight afterwards. Be saw his brother Frederick dressed in a military uniform with silver facings, and the latter stated that he was going on an exploring expedition to the Argentine Republic. Frederick told Albert's wife early in August that his family were in Brighton. Shortly before Mary (Frederick's wife) left Albert's house for Rainhill, Frederick took LIOO from his wife, and the family stayed at Albert's for nearly two years after returning from the Cape. Medical evidence attributed the death of the wife and children, Marie, Lilia, and Sydney, to their throats being cut, while Bertha were strangled. At the funeral of the remains many attended dressed in black, and the windows in the city were curtained. The vicar made a touching address at the grave, the bodies being interred together. The parish defrayed the burial expenses, as the Deeming family were poor. Much of Frederick's jewellery was discovered to be spurious, and several of the transactions with forged cheques in Liverpool prove that he had an accomplice. One of Frederick's (Williams) aliases during his short residence in Hull in October, 1889, prior to visiting Beverley, was Harry Dunn, a sheep farmer and owner of gold mines in Rockhampton. One of the mattresses sold to Mr Mathers and landlord of the Commercial Hotel showed sight blood stains. Writing from Sayd's Hotel to Joseph Mather, Deeming blamed him for harsh conduct to his mother and concluded. I was ashamed of his conduct, and I leave you in the hands of the Almighty, who some day will repay your sins." J When Deeming Bailed for Monte Video, the capital of Uruguay, he passed as director of a Gold Mining Company. On the passage across he presided at the ship's table and organised concerts and subscriptions for various charitable objects. (Received March 21, at 10 55 a m.) London, March 20.
Deeming had cards printed on which he styled himself manager of the new Novltsgelacht gold mine at Kerdsodop in South Africa. His possession of large sums of money is accounted for by the discovery that while in Africa two years ago he swindled a Transvaal bank out of L4OOO. For this crime he was wanted, as well as for swindling gentleman in Bedford out of large sums of money in connection with using companies. It is reported that at Antwerp he had a Gladstone bag full of sovereigns.
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Old July 9th, 2010, 09:24 AM   #4
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Southland Times, 21 March 1892

The Windsor and Rainhill Murders.
DEEMING PROTESTS THAT HE IS “INNOCENT,”
THE BOXES AT PLYMOUTH.
[United Press Association. — By Electric Telegraph— Copyright. ]
London, March* 18.
The pantry in Williams' house had been cemented to prevent the smell arising from the bodies of the victims. Deeming, alias Williams, inspected several houses in Rainhill, and included a clause in the agreement giving him permission to cement the floor. It is believed the boxes sent to Plymouth contained the removed earth and clothes. One box has been found at Falmouth containing clothes, some bloody. Williams took Miss Mather, his bride, to Denham villa, and there celebrated the marriage by a dance and musical entertainment. The police are now seeking for the nurse who attended his wife at Rainhill. The News states that the chloride of lime used by Williams to destroy all traces of his crime preserved evidence against him. The Standard describes him as one of the most audacious and cruel scoundrels of modern times. Many dates in Williams' career negative the theory that he is identical with " Jack the Ripper." His wife wishing to put a stop to Williams relations with another woman insisted upon leaving Birkenhead for Rainhill, and it is alleged that he thereupon murdered her and the children in order to proceed with his courtship of Miss Mather. Received 20th, 6 p.m. At the inquest on the remains found in Denham Villa Albert Deeming gave evidence to the effect that seven months ago he had dreamt that his sister-in-law and her children had been murdered. His statement created a sensation. At the funeral which took place at Rainhill, 1000 people were present. The clothes discovered at Plymouth included much belonging to the children, including their toys. The large box is still missing. In the House of Commons to-day Mr Matthews, Home Secretary, in reply to a question, declared that active negotiations are taking- place between the Lancashire police and those in Australia with regard to the man Williams. The inquest will probably result in a verdict of murder, completing the case in every respect, so that if the prosecution fails in Melbourne, Deeming will be brought here to stand his trial on
the capital charge. It has been discovered that during his courting at Beverley, Williams, who was then travelling under the name of Harry Lawson, an Australian farmer, found it necessary to make a trip to Antwerp where he met with an accident. Mrs Matheson and her daughter (the latter was engaged to Williams) nursed him through his illness, and after his recovery the wedding was celebrated, the honeymoon being spent at Bournemouth. Subsequently the bride and bridegroom returned to the Station Hotel in Hull, where one morning Deeming left the hotel on a pretence of making a call on some friends, but he never returned. The inquest has been adjourned for a week.
March 19.
Further inquiries by the police elicit the facts that Mary James and her sister Martha, Servants at Birkenhead and Pembroke, married Fredrick and Albert Deeming respectively. Mary was a short, dark woman, bearing a resemblance to one of the bodies recovered. The Hull police have identified a portrait of Williams as that of a man who passed under the assumed name of Harry Lawson, and who married Miss Matheson. When in prison Williams stated that he was separated from his wife at Birkenhead, and that he had several nuggets of gold in a distant town. He attempted to bribe several of the gaol officers and appeared to be a man of such determination and great resources that the governor of the gaol refused to allow him to work in the open air, and Williams was repeatedly shifted from one cell to another and closely watched. He stated to the officials that he had travelled over the world — Australia, America, Africa — and was even a greater traveller than Stanley. The governor of the gaol, considering him to be a daring and ingenious scamp, caused a portrait to be taken of him before he left Hull prison. A Masonic costume and many clothes found at Plymouth are marked " Deeming." Deeming left many portmanteaux at Birkenhead, Hull, and Rainhill, and these are believed to be the spoils of several robberies and burglaries. At the inquest Albert Deeming stated that the last time he saw his brother Frederick and his wife was in July. He understood at that time that they I were going to Rainhill in a few clays, and thence to California. A fortnight afterwards he saw his brother Frederick dressed in military uniform with silver facings, and the latter stated he was going on an exploring expedition to the Argentine Republic. Frederick told Albert's wife early in August that his family were at Brighton. Shortly before Mary (Frederick's wife) left Albert's house for Rainhill, Frederick took LIOO from her. His wife and family stayed at Albert's for nearly two years after returning from the Cape. The medical evidence attributes the deaths of the woman and the children, Mario, Leila, and Sydney, to their throats having been cut, while Bertha had been strangled. At the funeral the vicar made a touching address. The
parish defrayed the burial expenses as the Deeming family are poor. Much of Frederick's jewellery, now being discovered, is spurious, and several of his transactions with forged cheques in Liverpool prove that he had an accomplice. One of Deeming’s aliases during a short residence in Hull in October, 1889, prior to visiting Beverley, was Harry Dun, sheep farmer and owner of gold mines in Rockhampton, Queensland. On the mattresses sold by him to Mr Mathers and the landlord of the Commercial Hotel slight blood stains have been discovered. Writing from Seyd's Hotel to Joseph Mathers Deeming blamed him for his harsh conduct to his mother, and concluded by stating that he (Deeming) was ashamed of his conduct and " I leave you in the hands of the Almighty, who will some day repay you." When Deeming sailed for Monte Video he posed as the director of a gold-mining company. On the passage across he presided at the ship's table and organised concerts and subscriptions for various charitable objects
Perth, March 19.
The police have secured large quantities of Swanson's effects, including photographs and correspondence, which it is understood establish his identity with Williams. He arrived at Perth yesterday from Southern Cross, 270 miles from here, where he was working in a mine. When arrested he declared his innocence, maintaining that his name was Swanson, and not Williams. During his journey to York Williams ate and slept little, and fainted twice, but he maintained a cheerful appearance. He spoke confidently of his ability to prove his innocence. At York railway station be addressed a crowd, telling them that he was perfectly innocent, but had been victimised by a woman. At Perth thousands of people waited to see the prisoner, who looked travel-worn and anxious, but put on an air of bravado.
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Old July 9th, 2010, 09:25 AM   #5
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Colonist, 21 March 1892

THE WINDSOR TRAGEDY.
[Per United Press Association.] London, March 18
It is supposed that William's first wife, wishing to stop his relations with another woman, insisted on leaving Birkenhead for Rainhill, and thereupon was murdered, in in order to leave him free to continue his courtship of Miss Matheson. It appears that the pantry in Denham Villa has been cemented since the murders to avoid the smell which had been noticed, Deeming inspected several houses in Rainhill and included a clause in the agreement giving permission to cement the floor. It is believed that the boxes sent to Plymouth contain clothes and the earth which was removed from under the floor. A box of clothes has been found at Falmouth, some of the garments in which are stained with blood. The inquest on the bodies has. been adjourned.
Perth, March 19.
William's arrived at Perth in custody yesterday. When arrested he declared his innocence, maintaining that his name was Swanson and not Williams. The polios, however, have secured large quantities of his effects, including photographs and correspondence, which it is understood establishes identity. During the journey to York Williams ate and slept light and fainted twice but maintained a cheerful appearance. He spoke confidently of his ability to prove his innocence. At the York railway station he addressed the crowd telling them that ho was perfectly innocent but had been victimised by a woman at Perth. Thousands of people were is waiting for his arrival. The prisoner looked travel-worn and anxious, but put on an air of bravado. New Plymouth, March 19. With reference to the Windsor murder many people here say that a man named Arthur Williams, who on December 20, 1890, was charged with assaulting a girl near Inglewood, is the same man who is now under arrest. He got off with a fine of £15 or a month's imprisonment. Williams paid the fine and costs, coming to nearly £20. Williams was hawking cloth about. He had a great deal of jewellery, and from the description of the man charged with murder many think he was the same.
Dunedin, March 19.
In the middle of 1888 a man named Williams came from Wellington to South Dunedin, where he was for some time, accompanied by his wife and a servants girl. He bought woollen goods here and had stuff consigned to him from Wellington and went about to dispose of them. He bought a horse and buggy in the name of Mrs Williams and suddenly disappeared without; paying all his debt? He used to wear loud jewellery, and had a habit of showing his money to people. He spoke with a north country accent, and his description corresponds with that given in the telegram of the supposed murderer
Latest.
At the inquest on the remains of the victims of the man Williams, Albert Deeming gave evidence to the effect that seven months ago he had dreamt that his sister-in-law and her children had been murdered. His statement caused a sensation. At the funeral, which took place at Rainhill, 1000 people, were present,
The clothes discovered at Plymouth included much belonging to the children, including their boys. The large box is still missing. In the House of Commons to-day, the right Hon H. Matthews, Secretary of State for the Home Department, in reply to a question declared that active negotiations are taking place between the Lancashire police and those in Australia with regards to the man Williams.
The inquest will probably result in a verdict of murder, completing the case in every respect for if the prosecution fails in Melbourne Deeming will be brought here to stand his trial on the capital charge. It has been discovered that during his courting at Beverley Williams, who was then travelling on name of Harry Lawson, an Australian farmer, found it necessary to make a trip to Antwerp, where he met with an accident. Mrs Matheson and daughter, (the latter was engaged .to Williams) nursed him through his illness, and after his recovery the wedding was celebrated, the honeymoon -being spent at Bournemouth, a town in the County of , Hants, six miles by rail, west by south of Christchurch. . Subsequently the bride and bridegroom returned to the Station Hotel in Hull, where one morning Deeming left the hotel on the pretence of making a call on some friends, but he never returned. The inquest has been adjourned for a Week.
March 19. -
Farther enquiries by the police elicit the fact that Mary James and her sister Martha, servants at Birkenhead and Pembroke, married Frederick -and- Albert Deeming respectively. Mary was a 'short," dark woman, bearing a resemblance to one of the bodies recovered. "The Hull police have identified portrait of Williams with the man who passed under the assumed name of Harry Lawson, and who married Miss Matheson When in prison Williams' stated he was separated from his wife at Birkenhead, and that he had several nuggets in a distant town. He tried to bribe several gaol, officers, and he appeared to be a man. of such determination and great resource that the governor of the gaol refused to allow him to work in the open air, and Williams was rapidly shifted from one cell to another,- and closely watched. He stated to the officials that he had travelled over the world - Australia, America, Africa, and was even a greater traveller than Stanley. The governor of the gaol, considering him to be a daring and ingenious scamp, caused a portrait to be taken of him before he left the Hull prison. A Masonic costume and many clothes found at Plymouth are marked Deeming. Deeming left many portmanteaus at Birkenhead; Hull, and Rainhill, and these are believed to be the spoils of several robberies and burglaries. At the: inquest, Albert Deeming stated that he last saw his brother Frederick and wife in July. He understood at the time that they were going to Rainhill for a few days, and thence to California. A fortnight afterwards . he saw his brother Frederick dressed in military uniform with silver facings, and the latter stated he was going on an exploring expedition to the Argentine Republic. Frederick told Albert's wife early in August that his family were at Brighton, and shortly before Mary (Frederick's wife) left Albert's house for Rainhill Frederick took £100 from his wife,- and the family 'stayed at Albert’s for .nearly two years after returning from the Cape. The medical evidence attributed the death of the wife and children Mario, Leila, and Sydney to their throats being cut, while Bertha had been strangled. At the funeral of the remains many attended dressed in black, and the windows in the city were curtained. The vicar made a touching address at the grave, the bodies being interred together. The priest defrayed the burial expenses as the Deeming family is poor. Much of Frederick's jewellery being discovered spurious, and several of Frederick's transactions with forged cheques in Liverpool,
proves that he had an accomplice. One of Fredericks (Williams) aliases during his short residence in Hull, in October, 1889, prior to visiting Beverly was Harry Dun, sheep farmer, and owner of gold mines in Brockhampton, Queensland. On one of the mattresses sold to Mr Mathers, and the landlord of the Commercial Hotel, slight bloodstains have been discovered. Writing from Seyd’s Hotel to Joseph Mather, Deeming blamed him for harsh con duct to his mother and concluded, "I am ashamed of your conduct, and I leave you in the hands of the Almighty who some day will repay your sins." When Deeming sailed for Monte Video, the capital of Uruguay, he posed as a director of a gold mining company. On the passage across he presided at the ship's table and organised concerts and subscriptions for various charitable objects.
Sydney, March 20.
The police are busily engaged investigating houses where Deeming resided in Sydney.
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Old July 9th, 2010, 09:26 AM   #6
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Bush Advocate, 22 March 1892

The Wholesale Murderer
MORE PARTICULARS. (PER PRESS ASSOCIATION.)
London, March 19.
Further 'inquiries by the police have elicited the- fact that Mary James and her; sister Martha, servants at Birkenhead and Pembroke, married; Frederick and Albert Deeming respectively. Mary was a short, dark woman, bearing a resemblance to one of the bodies that have been identified. The Hull police have identified the portrait of Williams with a man passed under the assumed name of Harry Lawson, and who married Miss Matheson. When in prison Williams stated that He was separated from his wife at Birkenhead, and that he had several nugget of. gold in a distant town. He attempted to bribe several of the gaol officials, and he appeared to be a man of such determination and great resource that' the," governor of the gaol refused to -allow him to work in the open air, and he (Williams) was repeatedly shifted from one cell to another and closely watched. He stated to the officials that he had travelled all over the world— Australia, America, and Africa— and was even a greater traveller than Stanley. The Governor of the gaol, considering him to be a daring and ingenious scamp, caused a portrait to be taken pf him before he left the Hull prison. A Masonic costume and many of the clothes found at Plymouth are marked "Deeming." Deeming left many portmanteaux at Birkenhead, Hull, and Rainhill, and these are believed to be the spoils of several robberies and burglaries. At the inquest Albert Deeming stated that he last saw his brother Frederick and his wife in July. He understood that they were going to Rainhill for a few days, and thence to California. A fortnight afterwards ho saw his brother Frederick dressed in military uniform with silver lacings, and the latter stated that He was going on an exploring expedition to the Argentine Republic. Frederick told Albert's wife early in August that his family, were at Brighton. Shortly before Mary (Frederick's wife) left Albert's house for Rainhill Frederick took £100 from his wife and family. He stayed at Albert's for nearly two years after returning from the Cape. The medical evidence attributed the death of the wile and children, Marie, Leila, and Sidney, to their throats being cut, while Bertha had been strangled. At the funeral of the remains many people attended dressed in black, and the windows of the town were curtained. The Vicar made a touching address at the grave. The bodies were interred together. The parish defrayed the burial expenses, as the Deeming - family are
poor. Much of Frederick's jewellery has been discovered to be spurious, and several of Frederick's transactions with forged cheques in Liverpool prove that he had an accomplice. One of Frederick's (Williams) aliases during his short residence in Hull in October, 1889, prior to visiting Beverley, was Harry Dunn, a sheep farmer and owner of gold mines in Koch Hampton, Queensland. On the mattresses sold to Mr Mathers and the landlord of the Commercial Hotel Bore slight bloodstains have been discovered. Writing from Sayd’s Hotel to Joseph Mathers, Deeming (Williams) blamed him for harsh treatment to his mother, and concluded thus: "I am ashamed of your conduct, and I leave you in the hands of the Almighty, who some day will repay your sins." When Deeming sailed for Monte Video, the capital of Uruguay, he posed as a director of a gold-mining company. On the passage across he presided at the ship's table and organised concerts and subscriptions for various charitable objects. March 20. Deeming; had cards printed on which he styled himself manager of the New Novitgelacht gold mine at Klerksdop, in South Africa. His possession of large sums of money is accounted for by the discovery that while in Africa two years ago he swindled a Transvaal Bank out of £4000. For this crime he was wanted as well as for swindling a gentleman in Bedford but of a large sum in connection with a mining company. It is reported that at Antwerp he had a Gladstone bag full of sovereigns. In 1889, Deeming, with the aid of an accomplice, swindled jewellers in Johannesburg out of £300 worth of goods. While ho was there two mysterious murders were committed. The Curate of Rainhill announced from the pulpit to-day' that Miss Mather, the week previous to her wedding, censured him for casting
doubts on Deeming's bona fides. It has been discovered that after the murder of his wife and children Deeming showed his friends a blood-stained knife, which he alleged had saved him from the Kaffirs. There were serious disorders and fighting at Rainhill to-day the crowds which thronged- the place having differences of opinion as to how Deeming would best be punished.
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Old July 9th, 2010, 09:27 AM   #7
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Marlborough Express, 23 March 1892

WILLIAMS' CAREER IN AUSTRALIA.
From Australian files to hand to-day by the s.s. Wakatipu we (Post) cull the following items : — WILLIAMS CAREER IN NEW SOUTH WALES.
Williams arrived in Sydney in the early part of 1882. He was then going under the name of Frederick Bailey Deeming. He worked as a gasfitter, in the employment of Messrs J. Skinner & Co., for some months, till it was discovered that certain brass fittings were missing, and on enquiry being made suspicion rested on Deeming. On being charged he became very indignant, and accused his assistant a lad of fifteen, with being the actual thief. The lad was dismissed, but his friends, being confident of his innocence, secured the issue of a search warrant, and proceeded to search the lodgings of Deeming. Here they found, among other things, the stolen fittings, and the man was at once arrested. He was committed for trial, bail being allowed. He appeared in the dock at the quarter sessions in a suit of faultless black, and from his appearance one would have been justified in regarding him as a most unlikely person to be guilty of such a paltry offence. His defence was undertaken by the late Mr David Buchanan, who, in an impassioned address to the jury, invited them to look at the obvious respectability of the man, and consider whether such a man could be guilty of a crime so contemptible. After the case had closed for the prosecution, and to the astonishment of everyone, a receipt was produced from Messrs T. J. Sown and Co. for the payment of the cost of the very articles the prisoner was being tried for stealing.
A CLEVER TRICK
It was at once suggested that Messrs Brown and Co should be subpoenaed to test the genuineness of the document, which bore the stamp of the firm and was on the usual receipt forms. The manager appeared, and explained that during the interval between Deeming's committal and appearance at the sessions he called very early one morning at the warehouse before the bookkeeper or cashier had arrived, and informed the store man that he had bought some brass fittings some time before and wanted to pay for them. He tendered the money and demanded a receipt. This was given in good faith by the store man, and as the man was unknown to the firm, they had no means, of correcting what was regarded as a mistake. The manager then explained that no such purchase had ever been made, and that, moreover, no such fittings were in stock. This at once convicted Deeming in the minds of the jury. Although the
powerful defence of Mr David Buchanan seemed to have buoyed him up with such hopes of acquittal that when the verdict of the jury was returned, he fell m a fainting fit, and was removed from the dock. The sentence was
SIX WEEKS IMPRISONMENT
On the production of the receipt at the trial, he at once threatened an action for wrongful prosecution. At the time he was under sentence his wife and children arrived from Adelaide, from which colony he was said to have come himself. Upon his discharge he commenced business as a gasfitter in Lee's-lane, off King-street, and afterwards removed to Phillip-street. He continued in business for some time, and then became insolvent. It was found that he had furnished a house at Paddington in a very extravagant way on the time-payment system. He then sold the furniture for a large amount, representing the goods to be his own property.
HIS BANKRUPTCY
At the conclusion of the examination of the bankrupt in the District Court, Judge M'Farlane dealt in severe terms with the manner in which Deeming had given his evidence, and finally committed him to Darlinghurst Gaol for 14 days, for prevarication and evasion. In the month of May, 1888, the Official Assignee in the estate reported to the Judge in Bankruptcy that the creditors had requested him not to divide the assets for a time, inasmuch as they felt themselves warranted an instituting a prosecution for fraudulent insolvency. But about this time Deeming and his wife and family disappeared. Prior to the bankruptcy proceedings, Deeming from time to time appeared as defendant in the District Court, and had verdicts given against him at the instance of tradesmen to whom he was indebted. Since his disappearance about May, 1888, nothing appears to have been seen of Deeming in Sydney. Mrs Deeming, however; seems to have been in Sydney about the end of 1889, and to have avoided recognition. From this point all traces of the family has been lost.
VERY ANXIOUS TO MARRY AGAIN
It now appears that Williams," having got rid of his wife.-applied on the 2nd January to Holt's Matrimonial Agency for a young lady with matrimonial intentions. She must, he said, be good looking, aged 18 or 20, and know something of housekeeping. He described himself as 32 years of age, and said he was an engineer, having £360 in the bank. He was about to enter on a good appointment, and was a sober, steady man, just from England, having 14 years' testimonials from one master. He signed himself 'F. Duncan. Replying to a letter from the agency, he wrote, on the 5th January, saying he would call between 10 and 12 on the Saturday following, but never did so. It was immediately after this that he became engaged to Miss Rounsefell.
THE TRANSVAAL VENTURE
The following particulars are given by the Sydney Morning Herald of the swindle in the Transvaal :— it appears that in 1889 Deeming, for he was then known by that name, was at Capetown. Two gentlemen who had been up country at the diamond fields had returned to Capetown, and one of them was on the eve of embarking on the steamer for England, when the latter was accosted by Deeming, who had evidently seen him on the diamond-field He described property on the field in the Transvaal that he had to dispose of for something over £2000, and asked the gentleman referred to to become the purchaser, which he agreed to, should the property, on enquiry, agree with the description given. As he could not visit the property himself, this, gentleman deputed his friend to make the necessary investigation, and purchase the property if satisfied that the transaction" -was a good one. The gentleman then sailed for
England. Thereupon Deeming forged a telegram to which, he put the name of the proposed purchaser, and forwarded it to this gentleman's representative on the diamond-fields, requesting him to pay over the amount agreed, upon to Deeming. Deeming made his way to the Transvaal, and obtained the money. He stated that he would have to return to Capetown for a portion of the necessary papers to complete the transaction, and accordingly left. Of course he never again appeared, and the conclusion was drawn that the property was a bogus one. The gentleman who had been defrauded went to a great deal of trouble in trying to overtake the swindler, whom he traced to Hull and Beverley, finding out all about his marriage exploits at Horne and his imprisonment for false pretences' in the purchase of jewellery for one of the. duped women. - He seems, however, to have desisted from following up his own wrongs.
A Brisbane telegram says it is known almost beyond doubt that about eight years ago Deeming was a resident in the Rockhampton district, passing under the name Mollet; and it is a fact that when in South Africa he informed certain people that he' had worked as a miner both on Charters Towers and in the vicinity of Mount Morgan.
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Old July 9th, 2010, 09:28 AM   #8
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North Otago Times, Volume XXXVI, Issue 7324, 25 March 1892

THE MURDERER WILLIAMS.
BREAKING THE NEWS TO THE VICTIM'S MOTHER.
The task of breaking the news of the awful fate of the murdered woman to her mother fell to the lot of the London representative of the Argus, who received instructions to Interview the latter. The result of his mission is contained In the following special cable message which appeared in the Argus of yesterday :
London, March.12, 11.20 a.m.
On receiving your cable directions to inform you of such important facts connected with the Windsor murderer and his victim as could be gleaned in England, I immediately proceeded to Rainhill and sought out the mother of Emily Williams. I found her living in Rainhill, where she keeps a small shop, and is highly respected. Her name is Mather, and the maiden name of her daughter was Emily Lydia Mather, The delicacy of my mission will be apparent when I say that until she obtained the news from me Mrs Mather had not heard of any murder in Melbourne and was without the slightest idea of the fate
of her daughter! .- And when I told her of' the tragedy she fainted. On recovering It was some time before her anguish abated. Finally, after she had learned all the particulars I could give her, she freely communicated to me all she knew of Williams from the time he was engaged to her daughter until the last she had heard of both of them. He arrived here, "she laid," last July, and gave it out that he was about to take a house for his slater. [Our readers will remember that this was exactly what he said whore he rented the house in Windsor on December 16 ] His sister was never seen by any of the- inhabitants of Rainhill so far as I know. " At the time Williams came to the village and dating his stay here he followed no occupation, but described himself to us as a military man. He said that, hid father was a colonel, and was killed in the Crimea. He spent money freely, and mentioned that he had a rich uncle in England. I can see now that it was mysterious that this uncle, like his sister, was never seen, Williams also remarked that his position, in connection with the army was an inspector of stores. He proposed to my daughter, and pressed his suit, and I consented to the marriage. The courtship extended over some weeks, and they were married on September 22. All my friends, and a number with whom he had become acquainted in Rainhill, were invited to a party by William, to celebrate the marring. Among the papers found at the house at Windsor was a small book-cover, upon which was deciphered by the aid of a powerful magnifying glass the following— Mr and Mrs Albert Williams request the pleasure of the company of at a social evening in the Commercial-hall on evening,"]
“After the marriage Williams and my daughter went on their honey moon, and a few weeks afterwards he told me that be was about to leave England for Bombay, to which he was ordered to take charge of the army stores. His intention, so far as it was revealed, aroused no suspicion. They went from England on the first or second of November, and I implicitly relied upon his statement as to their destination. I had no idea that they were going to Melbourne until they bad arrived there. "My daughter did not write from Melbourne. The last letter I had from her was posted at Colombo. Williams also wrote from that place, and both letters were in affectionate terms.
"Up to the time you called to tell me of what has happened, the last word I heard of them was from Williams himself, dated Melbourne, December 29. [The murder is understood to have been committed on December 24]
In that letter he wrote: We have spent a happy Christmas'; and Emily is the happiest woman ever seen. She does enjoy herself.' "In the same letter Williams stated that he had been appointed manager of a tea business in Hong Kong, whither both were to sail in the steamer Catterthon, which was to leave on
January 4”
These were the main facts gathered in the interview. I have endeavoured to discover if anything is known of Williams antecedents, but so far have been unsuccessful. Though the mother appeared to have been satisfied with him, some of their neighbours were suspicious that he was not what he endeavoured to induce people to believe him to be. Ground for misgiving was afforded by the fact that on one occasion he was seen in the company of a strange woman, who was said by gossips to be his wife. It was also noticed that none of his relatives were present at the marriage ceremony, but beyond forming subject for passing comment, this circumstance was not regarded seriously. [Rainhill is a village of about 2000 inhabitants, two and a half miles from Preston in Lancashire, and nine miles from Liverpool.]
WILLIAMS S FORMER CAREER.
Glimpses of Williams’s history show, that be has always been an unprincipled scoundrel, and that be has, been married on one or more previous occasions There is therefore ground for the suspicion that he has had other victims. Inquiries which have been made in New South Wales and Queensland sow him to be identical with a man named Frederick Bailey Deeming, who was wanted in connection with an extraordinary charge of forgery and fraud at Cape Town; Mr J. Skinner, of Victoria street, Darlinghurst, in whose employment Williams was, has furnished particulars of his career in Sydney, from these it would .appear that Williams arrived in Sydney in the early part of 1882 under another name, He worked as gasfitter for Messrs J. Skinner and Co. He was a skilful workman, and continued in employment of the firm till it was discovered that a large quantity of brass fittings were missing, and suspicion pointed to him as the thief, He very indignantly repudiated the
charge, and succeeded in fixing the guilt on a lad fifteen years of age, The lad was dismissed, but his friends, decided to [illegible] the matter to the bottom. They, placed the affair in the hands of the detectives, with the result of [illegible] found on Williams's premises. He was committed for trial, but made a daring bid for liberty.
Evidence was distinctly against him, and no defence seemed possible, when Williams, who appealed faultlessly dressed in black, produced a receipt from a well-known wholesale firm for the identical articles which he was supposed to have stolen. The Crown Prosecutor, despite the fact that the receipt was evidently genuine, urged ,that an adjournment should be granted to test its authenticity. The
adjournment took place, and, when the manager of the company entered the witness-box, it was elicited that during the trial of the Quarter Sessions he had called early one morning at the warehouse of the firm before the bookkeeper or cashier had arrived, and informed the store man of his purchase, tendering the amount, and demanding a receipt.
The store man gave the receipt in good faith, and as the man was unknown to the firm they had no chance to rectify what they regarded at the time as a mistake. As a matter of fact no such purchase could ever have been made, for the firm never had such brass fittings in stock. Williams was then convicted; and sentenced to six weeks imprisonment. When the sentence was passed he pretended to faint in the clock, and had to be carried out of the court, While serving his sentence his wife and children arrived from Adelaide, where he had previously been employed, and after his discharge he continued business as a gasfitter on his own account. I though he seemed to be doing a large business, he evidently lived beyond his means, and no one was greatly surprised when he became insolvent. During the examination in to his affairs it was ascertained that he had furnished a house in a suburb in a very elaborate way on the time-payment system, and then sold the furniture for a large amount, representing it to be his own property. For this and other irregularities he was committed for trial on a charge of fraudulent insolvency, but, being admitted to bail, absconded, and was not again hoard of till charged with the murder at Windsor.
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Old July 9th, 2010, 09:29 AM   #9
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Wanganui Chronicle, 26 March 1892

TEN YEARS OF DEEMING'S LIFE
Deeming is an engineer and gasfitter by trade, although he has travelled so much in other capacities. He arrived in Sydney from Adelaide in 1882, describing him by his correct name, Frederick Bailey Deeming. He worked as a gasfitter for some time for the Sydney firm of Skinner and Co. He was a thief, his weakness being the "conveyance" of brass fittings. He was also a heartless liar, and invented a story of the theft so circumstantial, in which the blame was cast upon an assistant who worked with him (a lad of about 15 years of age), that the latter was dismissed. His friends, however, suspected Deeming, and communicated with the police, who obtained a warrant to search his house. There the missing fittings were found. He was arrested and committed for trial. At his trial he appeared in the dock in a suit of faultless black, and from his appearance one would have been justified in regarding him as a most unlikely person to be guilty of such a paltry offence. His defence was undertaken by the late Mr David Buchanan, who, in an impassioned address to the jury, invited them to look at the obvious respectability of the man, and consider whether such a man could be guilty of a crime so contemptible. After the case had closed for the prosecution, and to the astonishment of everyone, a receipt was produced from Messer T. J. Brown and Co. for the payment of the cost of the very articles the prisoner had been tried for stealing. It was at once suggested that Messrs Brown and Co. should be subpoenaed to test the genuineness of the document, which bore the stamp of the firm and was on the usual receipts forms. The manager appeared, and explained that during the interval between Deeming's committal and appearance at the Sessions he called very early one morning at the warehouse before the bookkeeper or cashier had arrived, and informed the store man that he had bought some brass 1 fittings some time before and wanted to pay for them. He tendered the money and demanded a receipt. This was given in good faith by the store man. and as the man was unknown to the firm, they had no means of correcting what was regarded as a mistake. The manager than explained that no purchase had over been made, and that, moreover, no such fittings were in stock. This at once convicted Deeming in the minds of the jury, although the powerful defence of Mr David Buchanan seemed to have buoyed him up with such hopes of acquittal that when the verdict of the jury was returned he fell in a fainting fit, and was removed from the dock, The sentence was six weeks imprisonment. On the production of the receipt at the trial he at once threatened an action for wrongful prosecution. At the time he was under sentence his wife and family arrived from Adelaide. Upon his discharge he commenced business as a gasfitter on his own account. He continued in business till 1888, and then became insolvent. It was found that he had furnished a house at Paddington in a very extravagant way on the time payment system. Ho then sold his furniture for a large amount, representing the goods to be his own property. He was sent to
Darlinghurst Gaol for 14 days for prevarication in connection with his bankruptcy. Upon leaving prison the creditors arranged to prosecute him for fraud, but he and his family disappeared. About the end of 1889, Mrs Deeming was soon in Sydney, and appeared anxious to avoid recognition. What became of her and her family subsequently is only too well known as a result of the shocking discovery at the house in Rainhill. But before the poor creatures were murdered Deeming found his way to the Cape, At Capetown, where he gave his true name, he met two gentlemen who had been up country at the diamond fields and had returned to Cape-town, and one of them was on the eve of embarking on the steamer for England, when the latter was accosted by Deeming, who had evidently seen him on the diamond field. He described property on the field in the Transvaal that he had to dispose of for something over £2000, and asked the gentleman referred to to become the purchaser, which he agreed to, should the property, on inquiry, agree with the description given. As he could not visit the property himself, this gentleman deputed his friend to make the necessary investigation, and purchase the property if satisfied that the transaction was a good one. The gentleman then sailed for England. Thereupon Deeming forged a telegram, to which he put the name of the proposed purchaser, and forwarded it to this gentleman's representative on the diamond fields, requesting him to pay over the amount agreed upon to Deeming. Deeming made his way to the Transvaal, and obtained the money. He stated he would have to return to Capetown for a portion of the necessary papers to complete the
transaction, and accordingly left. Of course he never again appeared and the conclusion was drawn that the property was a bogus one. The gentleman who had been defrauded went to a great deal of trouble in trying to overtake the swindler, whom he traced to Hull and Beverley, finding out all about his marriage exploits at Home and his imprisonment for false pretences in the purchase of jewellery for one of the duped women. He seems, however, to have desisted from following up his own wrongs. Deeming's marriage with the unfortunate Miss Mathers, their voyage to Australia, and the subsequent finding of her body under the hearthstone of the house at Windsor, are features of Deeming's career well known from our cable messages. After the tragedy Deeming made the acquaintance of the young lady who was on her way to Perth to marry him when his arrest took place. She was a charming young lady named Rounsefell, an orphan, some of whose friends live at Bathurst, New South Wales Miss Rounsvell had been staying at Broken Hill with her brother, is a storekeeper there, and was returning to New South Wales on the steamer Adelaide. The young lady suffered from mal de mer and Williams came forward in his role of medical adviser, just as he did to some of the passengers on the Kaiser Wilhelm II. He was unremitting in his attention to the unaccompanied young lady, and she could not feel otherwise than grateful. Utterly unsuspicious of any ulterior motive, she found him a pleasant man, and when he spoke of his wandering about the world and his "loneliness" her kind womanly heart went forth to him and she reciprocated his sentiments. There we have the explanation of how Williams was seen at Bathurst. Miss Rounsefell sister lives there- Brief as the acquaintance was, Williams induced Miss Rounsefell, who is little more than 20 years of age, to engage herself to him, and presented her with his murdered wife's rings and brooch. One of the rings was a very valuable one, set in sapphire and diamonds. He and his unsuspecting fiancé spent some days in Sydney, where he was seen by Captain Firth, but Miss Rounsefell did not hear the conversation when the Captain asked about Mrs Williams, whom he had known on board the Kaiser Wilhelm. Williams left Miss Rounsefell at Bathurst, and wrote several letters to her in most endearing terms. It was arranged
that they should be married, and he still stuck to the story that he was an engineer, and told her that he had secured an appointment at Western Australia. He was liberal with his money, and the young lady secured an extensive outfit with which to follow him to Western Australia, where the marriage was to take place. She had actually arrived in Melbourne en route, when the police intercepted her with the news of his arrest. When all had been made clear to her she sent the following telegram to her sister : — " I have gone to the seaside until this painful affair has blown over." She is a tall, rosy complexioned young woman, with a good figure. She at one handed over all the presents she had received from Williams to the detectives.
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Old July 9th, 2010, 09:31 AM   #10
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Grey River Argus, 23 April 1892

MORE OF DEEMING'S ANTECEDENTS.
THREE MURDERS IN ONE NIGHT.
According to the Melbourne Leader Superintendent Kennedy, of the Criminal Investigation Department, has now in his possession information of such an astounding, that at the same time authentic character as to confirm beyond all possible doubt the belief which has been very general throughout these colonies that in Deeming or Williams the police have secured one of the most systematic and audacious assassins that the world has seen. It has already been stated that William’s criminal career appears to have begun with a certain series of fraudulent offences, which gained for him an-unenviable notoriety throughout the whole of Griqualand West, South Africa, and even beyond the confines of this State. He made his first appearance here in the year 1876, passing popularly under the alias of Albert Williams. His career, however, was almost brought to a sudden termination when he found I himself charged before the Supreme Court with
A MAIL COACH ROBBERY,
Which he is believed to have consummated with the assistance of a confederate named Conk, who also
accompanied him to the dock. There was a lack of direct evidence of an incriminating character, however, and after a trial which lasted come time and created great sensation during the course of its proceedings, Williams and Conk were liberated. His connection with certain illicit purchases of STOLEN DIAMONDS
shortly afterwards actually did bring his experiences in that particular portion of the world to an end, which the mail robbery had only narrowly failed to do. Throughout the whole country side he was suspected by the police authorities of being a diamond thief and an " I.D.B." man, and when a specific case was got up, Williams adopted a discreet course, and disappeared. Several years passed, until at length there came the great boom which called the town of Johannesburg into existence on the face of a parched plain, which for centuries had concealed beneath its forbidding surface rich and extensive veins of gold, and had at length been compelled to yield Its wealth to the pick and shovel of the prospector. Among the hundreds of miners and others who found their way, In spite of many difficulties to the spot, was Williams, this time passing under the name by which he bad seen discreditably known In Sydney, Frederick Bailey Deeming, his own name, as it is now believed. This was in the year 1888. Williams had not been long in Johannesburg before he rented a pretentious office in Green's Chambers, whence he announced himself by cards, circulars and advertisement hi the periodical news sheet (it was hardly a newspaper then) as a mining expert and engineer. Privately he bought and sold gold claims, and: joined in other speculations.
A EUROPEAN, A KAFFIR, AND A HOTTENTOT MURDEREE.
Williams had not been in Johannesburg very long when the little community was shocked by the discovery, in an out of the way thoroughfare, one night in September, of the dead bodies of a white man named Graham, a Kaffir, and a Hottentot boy. In each case the scull presented the appearance of haying been battered in with some blunt instrument, and the throat was severed almost from ear to ear. The whole town was in a state of uproar. The excitement augmented from day to day, and the murderer, if he could have been found, would have undoubtedly been lynched. At the magisterial enquiry which followed two Hottentot boys tendered evidence of a very important character, as it contained clues by which it was possible to identify the criminal. These boys happened to be standing under a veranda on the night in question, when they saw a man, wearing a long, dark overcoat and a silk cap, approach the unfortunate Graham. There was some little conversation, and then the first-named individual raised a
knobkerry which he carried, struck Graham a violent blow on the head, and then, drawing a knife from one of his pockets, cut his throat. Turning round after he had finished his ghastly, work he found that a Kaffir and a Hottentot boy had been silent witnesses of the occurrence, and, rushing madly towards them, he dealt them terrible blows with the kerry, subsequently cutting their throats as he had done that of the man Graham. The two boys under the veranda, paralysed by fear, made no sign, but saw sufficient of the assassin to enable them to furnish a more or less satisfactory description of him at the enquiry. The only verdict under the circumstances was that at which the jury arrived, viz., one of wilful murder, but it was no easy matter to give effect to it, find the perpetrator of the crimes, and bring him to justice. The Transvaal Government stimulated the police, and offered a reward for his apprehension, and a number of the principal inhabitants of Johannesburg formed themselves into a vigilance committee, and subscribed a sum of L600 for the purpose of the search. Detective Brant was entrusted with the task of identifying the man wanted by the newly constituted vigilance committee
DEEMING LEVANTS
The result of his enquiries was to convince him that Frederick Deeming wag the assassin, but when he had sufficient information before him to warrant this assumption it was found that Deeming's office was closed, and that he himself had levanted the day after the crime, an occurrence which was not noted as significant at the time, owing to the influx and efflux of people continually going on. It was proved beyond doubt that Deeming wore the silk cap and overcoat which had been noted by the boys, at the Trocadero Music Hall, which he had visited on the night of the murder, and that he also was the last person seen in Graham's company. Particulars of a quarrel which had taken place between Deeming and Graham some time previously also reached the detectives. Deeming had, on that occasion, threatened Graham's life. On the night of the murder, it was further ascertained Deeming had visited one of the women's tents, wearing the silk cap to which allusion has been made. Some person in the tent exclaimed, "Why, that is blood that you have on your cap," and Deeming immediately took it from his head, and in a paroxysm of passion threw it upon the ground and stamped upon it. Deeming had also been in the habit of carrying just such a knobkerry as the boys saw used, and as the medical evidence showed had been employed. The case was one which rested chiefly, of course, on circumstantial evidence, but it was strong enough to have hung the man if he could have been found. Detective Brant identifies the police photograph of Deeming as that of the man wanted for the Johannesburg murders.
DETECTIVE BRANT'S REPORT.
The Argus publishes the following :— Detective Brant, who has lately been added to the Criminal Investigation branch of the police force In the colony, and who formerly was a detective in South Africa, has submitted the following report to Superintendent Kennedy :— " I have to report that I knew Deeming, alias Williams, at Kimberley, on the diamond fields at Griqualad Wear, South Africa, about fifteen years ago, where he first assumed the name of Albert Williams, and subsequently that of Frederick Deeming at Johannesburg, In the Transvaal, in the South African Republic in 1888. In September, 1888, three murders were committed at Johannesburg. The victims were a white man and two natives. The white man was known as Graham, and he was an officer in the British Army during the Zulu war. The crime was committed daring a very dark night in an out-of-the way street In the mining camp of Johannesburg, a street in which very few people resided. The bodies were very much mutilated, and the crime created a tremendous public sensation. The Transvaal Government did all in their power to vindicate the law, but failed, owing to the want of a proper police or detective system. After much trouble and expense on the part of the Government, the case was handed over to me for private investigation by a number of English gentlemen at Johannesburg, and may add here briefly that from all the circumstantial facts connected with the enquiries, and the medical evidence which came to my knowledge have reasonable grounds to believe that the person referred to is the murderer of the three persons in question. At Johannesburg from the early part of March to the commencement of September, 1883, the prisoner was connected with others, and among them one Carl Auspitz, in a banking swindle of L162,000 on the Natal Bank at Johannesburg. He was also connected with a swindle known as the Great Kruger Gold Mining Company at Johannesburg, which was floated In London for L110,000."
THE DETECTIVE RECOGNISES HIS PORTRAIT.
Detective Brant, has, he says, recognises the photograph of Frederick Bayley Deeming as that of the Deeming he knew, and has referred to Mr Alfred Harford, a member of Mr Alfred Dampier's Company at the Alexandra Theatre, for corroboration. Mr Harford, when Interviewed last night, was "made up" as a policeman engaged In hunting down " Roberts," the villain of "Wilful Murder," whose character is modelled upon that of Williams, of Windsor. Mr Harford said he and Detective Brant, who had become acquainted with each other in South Africa, had been speaking upon the connection of the Victorian Deeming with the South African Deeming, but whereas Brant had declared that he could identify the photograph now in the possession of the Victorian police, and was sure the two men were identical, he
(Harford) was not so positive. He could not say the photograph resembled the picture of Deeming that was impressed upon his recollection, and what he remembered of the South African swindles was that he was shorter than, and in other respects dissimilar to, Williams. However, he might, he admitted, be mistaken. Deeming certainly had a Lancashire accent, and was a confirmed braggart, as well as a postmaster at the art of swindling, and in these respects appeared strangely like his Victorian namesake.
DEATH AND BURIAL BY DEPUTY.
It was when Mr Harford was a member of the stock company of the Theatre Royal in Johannesburg in 1888 that he first became acquainted with Deeming. At that time Deeming was a prosperous man, and a man whose name as a mining expert and engineer frequently figured at the bottom of prospectuses for companies which rarely got beyond the floating stage. The swindle on the bank was a large one, and so successful that when the principals considered it wise to clear out of the country they gave a splendid banquet to the members of the Theatre Royal Company and chorus and a few private friends. Later on, Auspitz turned up in Delagoa Bay, where he bought a dead body and buried it as his own, in order probably to put the police off the track. Deeming, who had probably taught him the trick, was reported dead and buried at Durban, but while his dupes were regretting him it was learned that he had acquired the dead body of a miner who had died in the midst of strangers and had buried this body with due ceremony as his own, not even omitting to have the grave surmounted with a stone which set forth the name, age, and virtues of Frederick Deeming, mining expert and engineer. Regarding the three murders at Johannesburg, Mr Harford has no recollection of any suspicion ever attaching to Deeming, the first he heard of that being contained in the report of Detective Brant.
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