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PUNCH August 11,1888

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  • #76
    "I have a song to sing O!"

    A tale of a merry man moping mum

    Oh God, Suzi, my Fairy Fay childhood is sweeping past my eyes...

    Grandad age ten in 1888, going from Wandsworth with his dad up to the Savoy for the originals (and a bit of "Savoy Fare" ha ha).

    My dad going with his dad, then taking me in the 1960s from Wandsworth to Wimblydon [sic] Theatre to see John Reed play all those superb roles.

    Can't decide between Jack Point and the Lord Chancellor's song: when you're lying awake with a dismal headache...

    Bring on the October conference - Sam, Suzi, bring those song sheets with you! And SPOONS!!

    Love,

    FF
    X
    I wish I were two puppies then I could play together - Storm Petersen

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    • #77
      MASKELYNE, Master Magician & Inventor

      I looked up the names 'Maskelyne & Cook' as mentioned in Stewart's article, & found some pretty interesting tidbits. They were famous Stage Magicians with an incredibly popular & long-running London show, and invented many of the magic acts still used today.

      John Nevil Maskelyne has to his credit what must be the ODDEST combination of 'Famous Inventions' ever: He invented both the Levitation Trick and- try to guess- come on- give up? The PAY TOILET!
      (Even funnier if he ever combined the two, and by levitation successfully used his own pay toilet for free.)

      Though Houdini is often credited with the Levitation illusion, he got it from Maskelyne.

      But the invention for which Maskelyne really lives on is the pay-toilet, that icon of modernity... he invented the special lock which made it feasible. The phrase ''Spend a Penny'' comes from this. (It will probably never be the Final Jeopardy Question, I grant you, but I thought it was funny.)

      His family carried on the Magic & Illusion tradition, and his grandson Jasper Maskelyne helped invent some of the amazing WWII British military camouflage & tactical deceptions that helped defeat Hitler. He was a member of the A-Force 'Magic Gang' which helped to conceal & protect the crucial Suez & Alexandria Canals in Egypt, and he helped create the fake Tanks, etc. that misled Rommel in the buildup to the Battle of El Alamein. Pretty cool!

      I found this info on a number of sites, including Wikipedia & Magic sites. Apparently British Television did a documentary about Jasper.(There seems to be some recent controversy about him, with a modern author claiming that J.M. either took or was given too much personal credit for some of the ingenious tactical ideas, but I didn't go into the subject.)

      All in all, an interesting family- I bet an evening at the Maskelyne house was something else! Cheers, Archaic

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      • #78
        Hi Archaic

        Yes - he was an accomplished magician, and the theatre was purposefully built/fitted out to accomplish many of the tricks which he personally invented

        I can't see what the argument is about Jasper's work in WWII - he used the principles of illusion to create ports and other targets for the bombers - mainly night raids, so he used lights to "imply" that buildings were present when in actuality there was nothing there

        I'm sure he had a hand in inventing the ship camouflage known as "Dazzle" in which prominent white and black flashes broke up the shape of the ship to someone scanning the horizon with binoculars

        The idea was that the brain didn't connect the image to that of a ship and completely passed over it, rendering the ship "invisible"

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        • #79
          Hi Archaic,

          At the back of my mind I seem to recall that George Grossmith and his good lady wife went to a ball and he got themselves introduced by the MC as Mr & Mrs Walter Closet. Not sure if this was meant to have happened for real or was just one of his funny stories. I've probably got it in my old notes somewhere. But the Grossmiths were well into that sort of thing. They claimed to have stood outside Madame Tussauds and asked passers-by for directions to Madame Tussauds, and did the same at Niagara Falls, asking where the falls were! A right pair of clowns.

          Love,

          Caz
          X
          I wish I were two puppies then I could play together - Storm Petersen

          Comment


          • #80
            Originally posted by Archaic View Post
            Maskelyne has to his credit what must be the ODDEST combination of 'Famous Inventions' ever: He invented both the Levitation Trick and the PAY TOILET!
            (Even funnier if he ever combined the two, and by levitation successfully used his own pay toilet for free.)
            ... but all-too horrible to contemplate if it went wrong

            Comment


            • #81
              The Famous 'No-Pay Pay-Toilet' Leviatation Act

              Agreed, Sam! I think you should work it into a Caption... gee; would it work for the current one? Hmmm... Maybe if he somehow crashed & t.p.'d himself?

              Or it would be fun to Photo-shop a dramatically phony Victorian action shot of the daring feat.
              (I'd try doing it myself, but I'm a total computer spaz. I'm doing good if I can type.)

              See ya! -Archaic

              Comment


              • #82
                Hi folks

                I realise this is out of place as the discussion has moved on but, as a novice who’s only just come across this debate, I thought it might still be relevant.

                I seem to recall a similar debate about Punch some years back on the Casebook, in which I posted the following:

                Punch records of fees paid to contributors for August 1888 lists the author of “Two American Eye-Openers,” on 11 Aug. 1888, under the penname of “Jack-in-the-box,” as the regular contributor on theatrical matters, a Mr. Burnand.

                Mr Grossmith, who is only credited with penning “Diary of a Nobody” during August 1888, did not contribute to the 11th Aug. issue.

                An even earlier Casebook post included the following:

                A small extract from "'Arry on St. Swithin." which appeared in Punch, August 4, 1888 included: "My Houseboat - leastways I'd the run of it, Charlie, old pal, The Boss bein' Bagshot, the Booky, who hired it to please his new gal - Our Houseboat, the 'Margery Daw,' was as smart as they make 'em, no doubt, But the spree gave yours truly the hump; it wos jest one perpetual spout."

                'Arry's letters to his 'old pal' 'Dear Charlie', with their ‘cockney slang’ and frequent references to 'yours truly' were a regular feature of Punch, penned by E. J. Milliken, who also contributed “Jack at the Windlass” Aug.11 1888, and Dr Jekyll and Mr O’Hyde, Aug.18 1888.

                Hope this is of some use.
                Apologies for butting in.

                Best wishes
                alex
                But for me, in my impenetrable mantle, the safety was complete. Think of it – I did not even exist!
                (HJFSotC – SCoDJaMH – RLS, 1886)
                https://www.amazon.com/author/alexchisholm
                http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B006JFY5TC

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                • #83
                  Dear Alex:

                  Please butt in all the time. Please !

                  Thank you for this additional information,sor...
                  To Join JTR Forums :
                  Contact Howard@jtrforums.com

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                  • #84
                    Hi, Alex!

                    Hi, Alex & welcome once again!

                    And you're not ''butting in'' as you put it, because you are now a bona fide member of this swanky club!

                    Of course, I am a full 2 weeks your Senior, but they haven't even taught me the secret hand-shake yet, so I'd say we're pretty equal.

                    Would the older 'Punch' posts you refer to be on the CB Archives disk? (I think its 2001-2007.) I'd love to look it up, if you happen to know.

                    Thanks & have fun, Archaic

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Archaic:

                      Alex is,as I mentioned before on the sly...the co-author of "The News From Whitechapel". He's been around and we are all very happy that he is around here.
                      To Join JTR Forums :
                      Contact Howard@jtrforums.com

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                      • #86
                        OK, How; guess I'm still the Junior member then... but you still haven't taught me the Secret Handshake!

                        And hey, how 'bout them expensive tickets you sold me to the JTR Forums VIP Lounge & Disco Nightclub?? I've called them & they're never open.

                        grumble...grumble... Archaic

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                        • #87
                          Thank you both

                          Archaic, my computer is telling me that I wrote the earlier post, in reply to my old sparring pal Yaz, on 6th December 1998. So I’m not sure if it’s on any Casebook disc. I can certainly send you a copy though, if you want- even without the secret handshake.

                          Best wishes
                          alex
                          Last edited by Alex; May 22, 2009, 09:22 PM. Reason: rubbish spelling
                          But for me, in my impenetrable mantle, the safety was complete. Think of it – I did not even exist!
                          (HJFSotC – SCoDJaMH – RLS, 1886)
                          https://www.amazon.com/author/alexchisholm
                          http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B006JFY5TC

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Archaic:

                            It isn't my fault that you fell for that one or the one about buying the Brooklyn Bridge.

                            Let me swing back over to Alex for a moment here...

                            Dear Alex:

                            What do you think about the possibility of the "yours tremblingly" being in any way, shape, or form the source of the "yours truly" ?

                            Thank you,sor.
                            To Join JTR Forums :
                            Contact Howard@jtrforums.com

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                            • #89
                              Originally posted by Nemo View Post
                              I'm very interested in this aspect and am going to post a few pix that may have some relevance. - ie, that a reader or writer of Punch gained ideas from some of the articles. They are all from Punch Aug-Oct 1888
                              I'm late to this thread, but the first thought that screamed through my brain was that a lot of the doggerel sounds like.....

                              The Diary.

                              In fact, I can see Punch positively infusing the damned thing.

                              Fortunately, Sir Jim had no connections to the theater other than his brother.

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                              • #90
                                Cazzi-
                                I haz the words.... Oooooooooooh my Gawd we could 'ave a sing 'eh Misery me lackadaydee

                                O M G John Reed!!!! I went backstage (!) with him many a time - he was the BEST and also Dance Tutor for Surrey County Council- they took him into schools!!! Can you imagine the 'Gavotte' lesson??...heaven!.............. Oncely twicely.....Bow expressively ere you glide.... hehe

                                Such a LOVELY man too!!! used to smoke 70 a day too!!!!! (Hence the voice!!!!)


                                What a loss 'eh...and Donald Adams ! xxxxxxxxx (Thats me backstage!!!! heheeeeeeeee)

                                xx

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