Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Points To Ponder- Henry Dowd & Jack The Ripper

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Bump Up

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Wolf:

    Thanks for stopping in to inform us of the changes/updates.

    I remember reading it years ago, but for some reason didn't initiate a thread on the Slasher and your great list of Dowd-related characteristics.

    Hopefully, some more people will show up here and we'll do the article justice.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wolf Vanderlinden
    replied
    Thanks to both Tom and Howard for the kind words. They are much appreciated. And yeah, Ripper Notes was one hell of a magazine from its beginning under Chris George, Sam Gafford and Christopher-Michael DiGracia to CMD's sole editorship to Dan Norder, who did an amazing job with it before things went south.

    The Jack the Slasher article, which I really enjoyed writing by the way, came out of my Carrie Brown research. Because of this I have, over the years, done some follow up work on the subject.

    Dowd's birth certificate shows that he was born George Henry Dowd rather than Henry G. Dowd, which is what he went by in New York, in March of 1854, making him 36 when he was arrested.

    Although Dowd's brother stated that the family came to New York in 1859 (which is probably correct) the 1900 US Census states that he came to the US in 1875 (which is wrong) while the 1910 US census states it was in 1870.

    I also discovered that according to the 1880 US census Dowd was a "laborer" being held on Ward's Island with his health listed as "insane." Since everyone else on the page is also listed as insane he was obviously being held in the Ward's Island Asylum, the main insane asylum for New York City. Dowd eventually ended up in the Matteawan State Hospital for the Criminally Insane where he is listed in the 1900 and 1910 US censuses (censi?) and was probably an inmate with Ameer Ben Ali who was also at Matteawan.

    The conclusions at the end of the article were meant to show that Ripperology tends to over think things when it comes to the Whitechapel Murderer. Dowd was a contemporary serial assaulter, and Ripper suspect (albeit only by the New York media), who used an edged weapon (razor in this case) against helpless individuals whom he stalked in a poor slum area. Some parallels with the Ripper are clear but as a suspect he was a pathetic, alcoholic, insane wretch. More Kosminski than Prince Eddy.

    Wolf.

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Tom:

    I disagree that Dowd was more like Ridgway if only for the fact that Dowd and the Ripper were ambulatory as opposed to Ridgway who used a vehicle in his crimes.

    Ridgway also held on to a job ( as a spray painter)...something Dowd, at least, is not known to have done.

    Thanks for making a go of the thread....hopefully, others will chime in.

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    The fellow who wrote the Philadelphia Slasher article is a member of the Forums, Tom.
    The Slasher attacked a girl ( One of the Quinn family) in Wissahickon, the neighborhood I used to live in...

    Mike Covell was the one who brought the article to our attention.

    There shouldn't be any stigma, RN was an excellent magazine... I'm taking two more old issues of RN to work today to look for thread ideas or topics to discuss.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tom_Wescott
    replied
    Originally posted by How Brown
    It's entitled, Jack The Slasher ( Not the Philadelphia Slasher who appeared in the first decade of the 20th Century or any other ).
    Wow, talk about serendipity. After writing my last post, I got off the internet and picked up the new issue of Fortean Times that I purchased earlier this evening. I open it up to find an article titled 'Jack the Slasher'! And it's about the 1905 Philadephia guy that you referenced. How weird is that?

    Yours truly,

    Tom Wescott

    Leave a comment:


  • Tom_Wescott
    replied
    Hi Howard. It sounds like Dowd had more in common with the Green River Killer (Gary Ridgway) than with Jack the Ripper. I remember enjoying Wolf's article years ago. Good to occassionally see people like yourself look past the stigma placed on Ripper Notes by its last editor and remember that it was a great magazine with a lot of good stuff in it, Wolf Vanderlinden's contributions chief among them.

    Yours truly,

    Tom Wescott

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    I'll put some more articles up tomorrow....

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    St. Louis Republic
    January 12, 1892
    **************

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Afro-American Advocate
    (Kansas)
    February 5, 1892
    *************

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    started a topic Points To Ponder- Henry Dowd & Jack The Ripper

    Points To Ponder- Henry Dowd & Jack The Ripper

    I took an issue of Ripper Notes ( # 27 ) to work and re-read a pretty interesting..in fact a damn good story...by Wolf Vanderlinden today.

    It's entitled, Jack The Slasher ( Not the Philadelphia Slasher who appeared in the first decade of the 20th Century or any other )....this Slasher being Henry G. Dowd, a 42 year old native Liverpudlian, who in late 1891 on into early 1892 went on a throat and facial slashing rampage in New York City attacking males in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. One man was murdered by Dowd during this skein.

    Dowd was eventually arrested,tried and convicted and sent to Auburn, New York's State Insane Asylum.

    Wolf pointed out some of Dowd's characteristics and suggested that we might take a look at what Jack The Ripper may have been like.

    Lets do that, shall we ?

    The following list was constructed by Wolf Vanderlinden.


    1. Dowd was a deranged man with a history of insanity which seems to have run in his family. His brother John was religious to the point of mania. Interestingly, Dowd's mental problems took the form of delusional paranoia, a feeling that someone was out to kill him and he was not considered dangerous. Had he killed more of his victims and remained, like Jack The Ripper, uncaught, would he even be considered a likely candidate for being Jack The Ripper ?

    2. He had a history of being in trouble with the law and had spent time in prison for both small and larger offenses as well as time in an asylum. Apparently none of the correctional or mental health professionals he came into contact with recognized his potential for violent assault and murder.

    3. He wasn't a butcher or a clever surgeon and had no experience using knives in a professional capacity.

    4. He was described mentally as being stupid and an imbecile.

    5. He began his assaults several years before his Jack The Slasher series.

    6. He was a down and out nobody, barely scraping by in life with mental afflictions that forced him to depend on his relatives in order to survive.

    7. He could not hold down a job for any length of time.

    8. He was a con man sending begging letters to strangers seeking financial help because of various fictitious medical problems.

    9. He was an alcoholic but was stone sober on the night he attacked his last victim ( A man named Miller -HB).

    10. He was lucky rather than skilled in evading capture.

    11. He attacked in and around the area close to where he lived and over ground that he knew best.

    12. He prowled the streets nightly, actively looking for likely victims, disregarding those whom he considered unsuitable.

    13. Although splashed with blood, Dowd was able to walk the atreets unnoticed, not by the use of any disguise such as dressing like a butcher or doctor or midwife, but by the simple expedient of wearing a long,black coat.

    14. He chose victims who were easy targets and non-threatening: men who were drunk to the point of stupefaction and who couldn't fight back or offer any resistance.

    15. He followed his victim ( the last one...Miller ) for some time waiting for just the right opportunity to attack. ( The policeman who captured Dowd, Bill Masterson, followed Dowd as Dowd stalked and would eventually attack Miller).

    16. He provided a reason for his attacks...a reason which would later be shown to be highly specious, if in fact, not true at all.
Working...
X