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Points To Ponder- With The Aid Of The Police ?

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  • Points To Ponder- With The Aid Of The Police ?

    With a gun to yer head....

    Do you feel that some of the skill or good fortune that the Whitechapel Murderer had in eluding capture on the highways and byways of Whitechapel...was a direct result of the fixed beat and/or cognizance of where the nearest uniformed policeman, stationary or while on the prowl ,would be while he was on the game ?
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  • #2
    Good question, How.

    I would say yes, but not from the killer; from the victim.
    This perp probably had engaged prostitutes for some time before he escalated to violence; making 'dry runs' as Bundy once referred to it, to charge his fantasies with a bit of reality in the process of escalating to the next level.

    The victims would have known their own 'patch' better that a predator who may not be able to for-see when or where his opportunity might present itself; nor be as tuned into activities of others at any given location at any particular time. He would trust in their need to know when the time was right to consummate a deal in an otherwise public arena without disturbance... especially from a cop.

    Whatever time they needed was all the time he needed.
    Best Wishes,
    Cris Malone
    ______________________________________________
    "Objectivity comes from how the evidence is treated, not the nature of the evidence itself. Historians can be just as objective as any scientist."

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    • #3
      Another good question, How.

      And I am in pretty well in agreement with Cris, that in fact the victims sometimes unwittingly became their own worst enemy by leading Jack to quiet spots under the premise of a "transaction", what with their having by necessity to understand when and where and how to avoid the police. And then Jack used the time, place and circumstances to his advantage - very, very sad for the victims who were just trying to make a couple of bob.

      Cheers,
      Adam.

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      • #4
        Thanks AW,Cuz...

        One thing I was mulling over this morning was how other people's routines ( the guy down the hall who leaves at 5:05 sharp...the guy with the newspaper truck at the convenience store at 6:10 sharp...the co-worker who arrives at 6:35 sharp nearly every morning...) become part of our routine at some point in some small way....or perhaps in a more important way depending on the circumstances.
        Not enough coffee in me to fit that into a conversation at the moment, but you get my drift. This same sort of thing went on in those primarily ambulatory times.
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        • #5
          I know where your coming from, How. I'm doin' a 'double shot' of caffeine right now, although its mid-morning and the work schedule is going to hell in a handbasket...LOL.

          You have a point about routines. If this individual was a 'local' I would think that -no matter what his mental condition was- he would have the pulse of the neighborhood to some extent in a general way that would augment that of his victims.

          Even in Berner St. - where something may have gone wrong- he manages to slip through the cracks and extricate himself somehow ( providing, of course, that the same perp killed again that night)... and it still could have been shear luck.
          Best Wishes,
          Cris Malone
          ______________________________________________
          "Objectivity comes from how the evidence is treated, not the nature of the evidence itself. Historians can be just as objective as any scientist."

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          • #6
            Originally posted by How Brown View Post
            With a gun to yer head....

            Do you feel that some of the skill or good fortune that the Whitechapel Murderer had in eluding capture on the highways and byways of Whitechapel...was a direct result of the fixed beat and/or cognizance of where the nearest uniformed policeman, stationary or while on the prowl ,would be while he was on the game ?
            There's another aspect to the question of routine. The stranger.
            For a murderer to make himself very visible in the locale is insurance. Frightened witnesses often look for the "suspicious stranger". The well-known local face is less likely to draw attention to himself, he earns their trust in advance.

            We have a handfull of sources which indicate the streets of Whitechapel were thronging with people, workers, drifters, women, & kids out at all hours. Yet we often read a witness remarking "they saw no-one", or "saw no suspicious person".
            Given the apparent contradiction here we perhaps should interpret some of those witness statements as meaning, "saw no-one out of the ordinary", not nobody at all.

            One of the best forms of disguise is to hide in plain sight!

            Regards, Jon S.
            Regards, Jon S.
            "
            The theory that the murderer is a lunatic is dispelled by the opinion given to the police by an expert in the treatment of lunacy patients......."If he's insane
            " observed the medical authority, "he's a good deal sharper than those who are not".
            Reynolds Newspaper, 4 Nov. 1888.

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            • #7
              Hi all,

              This is another example of the 'Invisible people' that have been discussed before on various threads.

              As Wicker Man says, "...one of the best forms of disguise is to hide in plain sight!"
              Dave
              "From Hull, Hell and Halifax, Good Lord deliver us."

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