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Point To Ponder : Is The "Anti-Semitic Angle" Card Overplayed In The Case ?

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  • #91
    Might it not have depended on where on the wall it was possible to write with chalk? I thought I read that there was a kind of dado, a dividing line of black bricks which only went so far up the wall? If the writing had to be done on those black bricks, the height would have been limited accordingly.

    Love,

    Caz
    X
    I wish I were two puppies then I could play together - Storm Petersen

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    • #92
      Maybe the writer was a Dadoist poet.

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      • #93
        Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
        Maybe the writer was a Dadoist poet.
        Don't remind me! I'm just getting over a dose of the Schwitters:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6X7E2i0KMqM
        Kind regards, Sam Flynn

        "Suche Nullen"
        (F. Nietzsche)

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        • #94
          This nearly made it on to "The Great Gig In The Sky."

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          • #95
            Hi all,

            Merv:

            Exactly! Even to this day, chalk is used in pubs when playing billiards, scoring games, etc. All just guesswork, of course, but on a weekend night in particular., surely it's not too much of a long shot to suggest that Jack might have been partaking in some social hobby like that, as opposed to carrying chalk for his profession.

            Paul:

            Again i'm living dangerously by playing the logic card here, but if Jack, as you suggest, had beaten a hasty retreat from Mitre Square and popped into the shadows of the Wentworth Dwellings archway to catch his breath for a minute, I doubt that the first thought on his mind wouldn't been to write a perfectly neat message on the archway whilst on his haunches.

            Caz:

            If that was the case, and he was determined to leave the message, why not pick a spot more suitable to the cause, rather than the reverse?

            Cheers,
            Adam.

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            • #96
              Originally posted by Adam Went View Post
              Caz:

              If that was the case, and he was determined to leave the message, why not pick a spot more suitable to the cause, rather than the reverse?

              Cheers,
              Adam.
              Hi Adam,

              Apologies for the belated response and a happy new year to you and all.

              I'm not sure I understand your point. Whoever left that message must have been determined to do so, or they wouldn't have done it, and they did pick that particular spot, regardless of how suitable it may have been. It was said to be plainly visible to passers-by [which white chalk on black brick would allow] and this prompted its swift removal.

              If it was written by the killer, he obviously wanted to leave a 'calling card' close to where he chose to discard his latest victim's apron piece. If anyone else wrote it, the location was still chosen for a reason, even if this was entirely unconnected with the murders, the Jewish witnesses that evening, the victim's apron - or indeed 'Leather Apron'.

              I'm not too keen on dismissing potential connections as mere coincidences.

              Leather Apron - recently blamed for the murders.

              A message referring to the Jews being blamed [or not] for nothing.

              A victim's apron.

              Love,

              Caz
              X
              I wish I were two puppies then I could play together - Storm Petersen

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              • #97
                Hi Caz,

                I guess the point i'm getting at is, what sort of dramatic effect (assuming that's what Jack was aiming for) was a nicely written, small chalk message on a street unrelated to any of the Ripper murders supposed to have? There must have been a purpose to it in order for him to take the risk to stop and write it, with the piece of bloody apron in tow. Why not, for example, write the message in Mitre Square itself? Or, if the argument is that he had to beat a hasty retreat, why not then leave a message on the wall of Mary Kelly's room, for instance? The location of the message, the manner in which it was written, its vagueness, etc etc just doesn't gel well with me when considering it as a legitimate communication from a killer.

                Leather Apron? Perhaps John Pizer wrote the graffiti!

                Cheers,
                Adam.

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