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  • handwriting help again please

    Hi, can anyone decipher this please?

    new science.JPG

    I read the sentence as -
    "The enclosed are the results of a new science called [2 highlighted words] was taken last"
    Some kind of 'ology' by the looks of it?
    Thanks for any help or suggestions.

  • #2
    something biology???
    "be just and fear not"

    Comment


    • #3
      Electrobiology... or in this case- Electro Biology.

      They thought a lot of wierd things about electricity back then... magnetic fields around living beings and even hypnotizing animals and humans using electrical current and magnectic fields.
      Best Wishes,
      Cris Malone
      ______________________________________________
      "Objectivity comes from how the evidence is treated, not the nature of the evidence itself. Historians can be just as objective as any scientist."

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi Debs


        Not sure how helpful it is - first word looks like it is going to be something like blutro or clutro, but could also be c/blutio or c/blutis at the end, nothing else to help specify it at all?

        The second word I think is biology -

        Tracy
        If you're going to be two-faced at least make one of them pretty.

        Comment


        • #5
          Cris's would totally work - Cris how did you manage to get an e for the first letter!

          Tracy
          If you're going to be two-faced at least make one of them pretty.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks Jenn, Tracy, and Cris.
            Well done Chris, it looks like Electro Biology to me too...now. Very interesting.
            It's a pity that the results weren't included in the file as well as this letter. It would have been interesting to know how they used it in a murder case.

            Comment


            • #7
              Electro Biology - thats when they get frogs' legs twithching and stuff like that innit?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Tracy Ianson View Post
                Cris's would totally work - Cris how did you manage to get an e for the first letter!
                The writer connected the 'd' in 'called' with what would have been a capital letter in the next word because he/she used the capital 'B' in the second part. This would have made the upper part of the 'E' constricted because the flow of the pen is actually unnatural this way.

                Also, the other letters were easy to determine and Electro Biology was a 'science' during the Victorian and early Edwardian period. Its the only term that fits.

                Debs,

                Now you've got my curiosity.
                What type of murder case was it and what type of professional wrote this?
                Best Wishes,
                Cris Malone
                ______________________________________________
                "Objectivity comes from how the evidence is treated, not the nature of the evidence itself. Historians can be just as objective as any scientist."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Definitely electro biology

                  I don't think it was so much like Galvanism

                  At this period in history it appears to be a form of hypnosis (animal magnetism or mesmerism)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi Cris

                    Thanks for explaining, I learnt something new. :0)

                    I did notice that they had used a lowercase E but a Capital B, but I honestly don't think I would ever have managed to make it into an e. Then again I have never heard of Electro-biology either so maybe if I had known what that was it might have helped lol.

                    Tracy
                    If you're going to be two-faced at least make one of them pretty.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Nemo View Post
                      At this period in history it appears to be a form of hypnosis (animal magnetism or mesmerism)
                      Spot on I think, Nemo.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Pre-1850 by any chance Deb?

                        The sensation caused by the introduction and practice of mesmerism and it's subsequent history is quite an interesting subject

                        I've seen pictures of varied equipment including large bath like structures and pictures of scenes that appear to be stimulated by some form of mass hysteria/hypnosis

                        If I remember correctly, "original" mesmerism did not have any connection with hypnotic states, other than a possible explanation for sleepwalking

                        It seems strange to me that we use the term "mesmerised" today to indicate some sort of trance

                        Animal magnetism is still referred to today but is more akin to a form of sexual attraction

                        The original mesmerism was an attempt at healing by manipulating a perceived magnetic fluid which was thought to exist in all living things, usually by the laying on of hands or by the use of copper conductors and the like for people to hold on to

                        I suppose the nearest thing we have to it today is the practice of laying on of hands, or those copper/magnetic bracelets you can get to help arthritis etc

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          (Joining the party a little too late), that's how I see it too, “electro biology“, most probably referring to Mesmerism.
                          Originally posted by Nemo View Post
                          Pre-1850 by any chance Deb? {...} If I remember correctly, "original" mesmerism did not have any connection with hypnotic states, other than a possible explanation for sleepwalking
                          Mesmerism used to be connected with hypnotic states (long before the Freudian notion of “the unconscious“) in the late 18th century. There's a scene parodying these ideas in the Finale I of Mozart's comic opera Cosė fan tutte (from 1790), if anyone's familiar with it.
                          Best regards,
                          Maria

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hi Maria

                            In my view (which is possibly incorrect) the effects of Mesmer's practices were deduced to occur via what we would now call hypnosis or suggestion at a much later date than its introduction

                            His original claims were that the practitioner could influence the health of the patient using his own magnetism to affect that of the patient

                            Various instruments were also utilised to create some electromagnetic force

                            If you don't know already, you may be interested in the fact that he also utilised a glass armonica in his sessions, an example of which turned up on an antique program recently

                            The glass armonica is an unusual instrument in a number of ways and I think it's use was either banned or it's use brought into question due to a perceived adverse effect on the mind by the unusual tones produced

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hello Nemo,
                              I too believe that the effects of Mesmerism were results of auto-suggestion, nothing more.
                              Years ago I've gone through some texts by 18th century French philosophers on Mesmer (for a school project), but I don't recall most of that stuff anymore to save my life.

                              I know what a glass harmonica is and how it sounds, but had no idea Mesmer used one!
                              Oh, and there's an urban myth that opera composer Gaetano Donizetti initially used a glass harmonica in an echo effect against the coloratura singing for the madness scene in his opera Lucia di Lammermoor (from 1835, after Walter Scott) before changing from glass harmonica to flute, but the fact of the matter is this cadenza was not composed by Donizetti, as it's never been mentioned in newspaper reports from the 1830s-1840s. Recently an Italian colleague discovered that the cadenza in question was composed by opera singer Nellie Melba in the 1890s! (Not only long after Donizetti was dead, but even after the Whitechapel Murders, LOL.)

                              (And somehow we totally highjacked the thread.)
                              Best regards,
                              Maria

                              Comment

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