Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Days Of Your Years

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Days Of Your Years

    Thread for those who are willing to answer a few questions....
    You, of course, may be as thorough as you see fit.
    Thank you.

    1. How long have you been involved in research on a steady and serious basis ?

    2. Biggest change in your belief system from the outset until now.....

    3. Favorite area of research ( Debate, aspects of the Case, suspect-oriented research, attempts at a solution, newspaper trawling, research on a specific individual or individuals, out of box thinking, and so on and so forth.... )
    To Join JTR Forums :
    Contact [email protected]

  • #2
    1. How long have you been involved in research on a steady and serious basis ? 10 years.

    2. Biggest change in your belief system from the outset until now.....

    I've had a number. I used to believe the Dear Boss letter was genuine, and don't now. I used to think D'Onston the likeliest suspect and don't now.

    3. Favorite area of research ( Debate, aspects of the Case, suspect-oriented research, attempts at a solution, newspaper trawling, research on a specific individual or individuals, out of box thinking, and so on and so forth.... )

    Stride murder, Le Grand, fitting all the little pieces together.

    Yours truly,

    Tom Wescott

    Comment


    • #3
      Cool poll!
      1. How long have you been involved in research on a steady and serious basis?
      Less than 6 months.

      2. Biggest change in your belief system from the outset until now.....
      Hasn't happened yet, though there has been change in my considerations pertaining to Kozminsky and Le Grand.

      3. Favorite area of research (Debate, aspects of the Case, suspect-oriented research, attempts at a solution, newspaper trawling, research on a specific individual or individuals, out of box thinking, and so on and so forth....)
      Research: whatever's available in Paris (spy reports on the London anarchists, criminal records, Bertillon pics), the Arbeter Fraint translation project (for which I've located the translator), Macnaghten and Ostrog, Lacassagne's papers in Lyon.
      Out of box thinking: on Berner Street and hopefully at some point on Mitre Square.
      Particular capacity: multi-lingualism and mobility. Particular trait: modesty.

      __________________
      Best regards,
      Maria

      Comment


      • #4
        1. About 15 years after I was born.
        2. That people investigating the case can think rationally.
        3. David Radka.

        Comment


        • #5
          1. How long have you been involved in research on a steady and serious basis ? I suppose from my early teens.. about 40 odd years.. though the start was mostly libraries etc.

          2. Biggest change in your belief system from the outset until now.....

          I used to believe in a single killer... but haven't for many many years.
          I used to believe of possibilities in what I read... but Stephen Knight 's offering forced me to reconsider much of what had been written before. I went back and had a re-think.. and dismissed other theories.
          I used to believe everything that we were handed down as gospel truth. I came to the conclusion that there was too much that didn't add up.. not because the files etc were missing either. So from about 1980, I have a different general view. I believe the background of all what went on in Whitechapel to be of great importance, politically, socially and the human aspect.

          3. Favorite area of research ( Debate, aspects of the Case, suspect-oriented research, attempts at a solution, newspaper trawling, research on a specific individual or individuals, out of box thinking, and so on and so forth.... )

          Out of the box thinking. It does no harm to expand one's thoughts.. as long as one keeps a lid on the extremities!


          kindly

          Phil
          from 1905...to 19.05..it was written in the stars

          Comment


          • #6
            1.) Since 2004....seems much longer!

            2.) That suspect based research is a waste of time. For years I thought that Severin Klosowski was the one and only serious candidate as a JTR suspect - now, while I still rate him highly as a suspect, that viewpoint has decreased considerably and seems to be on a constant spiral downwards.

            3.) The setting in which the crimes were committed and most importantly, the day to day lives of those who inhabited Victorian era London....I just find the whole Victorian/Edwardian era a fascinating and fantastic study.

            Cheers,
            Adam.

            Comment


            • #7
              1. How long have you been involved in research on a steady and serious basis ? Casually, 21 years. Seriously, 8.5 years.

              2. Biggest change in your belief system from the outset until now..... From ID-ing the killer being important to ID-ing the killer being ancillary and pointless.

              3. Favorite area of research ( Debate, aspects of the Case, suspect-oriented research, attempts at a solution, newspaper trawling, research on a specific individual or individuals, out of box thinking, and so on and so forth.... ) Perhaps unsurprisingly, photographic research and topography.

              PHILIP
              Tour guides do it loudly in front of a crowd

              Comment


              • #8
                I would say about 2 - 3 years now.

                That I know a lot about the case, which I genuinely believed before becoming part of the community, even now after this time I know nuthin'. Also, finding the suspect is becoming less of a target, finding out about them is becoming more of an interest.

                Researching the suspects - Hyam Hyams and Jacob Levy - for now

                I am developing an interst inn other areas of the case the more involved I become though.

                Tracy
                If you're going to be two-faced at least make one of them pretty.

                Comment


                • #9
                  1. How long have you been involved in research on a steady and serious basis ?

                  As a child I had an interest, but the past 6 years have seen that grow into a full time hobby. I do between 6-8 hours a day, be it at the archives, history centre, or online. This is obviously increased if I travel out of Hull to other archival centres.

                  2. Biggest change in your belief system from the outset until now.....

                  I believe that everyone has preconcieved notions coming into the case, then we read more and more books, assimilate magazine articles, and share and discuss informtion on message boards, and we evolve and change. As a kid/teenager we were always told that Jack was from Hull. The story goes that a Satanic Doctor with VD resided in the Drypool district. He travelled to London, murdered, then vanished. These stories began circulating in the 80's after Hull Daily Mail published a series of articles on Stephenson and Chinese whispers over the years have altered the story. So coming into the case I thought highly of Stephenson as a suspect, but then getting hold of some primary sources my belief system changed. I was able to view material in Hull, London, etc that cast serious doubt, not just on the candidacy, but on the claims made against this man, and the rest is history.

                  3. Favorite area of research ( Debate, aspects of the Case, suspect-oriented research, attempts at a solution, newspaper trawling, research on a specific individual or individuals, out of box thinking, and so on and so forth.... )

                  I love researching and writing about Stephenson and Deeming, but have collected research on Frederick Richard Chapman, Lewis Carroll, Thomas Sadler, Joseph Liz/Silver, Walter Sickert, Prince Albert Edward, Prince Albert Victor, James Maybrick, MJ Druitt, and many other suspects. The information that is not pertinent to my research is either posted or shared with researchers in that chosen suspect field.

                  I love looking at old newspapers, both online, and at the archival centres, but my real passion is getting knee deep in the primary sources. I have files on Robert D'Onston Stephenson and his family that have never been published, files on Deeming that have never been published, and folders of telegrams, correspondence, criminal files, newspaper clippings, and much much more on some of the surrounding characters that fall into the scope of my research.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    1. How long have you been involved in research on a steady and serious basis ?

                    In some ways I am a part-time Ripperologist since as you and many will know I am also heavily invested in the field of War of 1812 research as well as in writing and editing poetry. I began to be hooked on the case at the time that the Maybrick Diary hit the publishing world back in 1993, coming as I do from Liverpool and intrigued by the idea that, James Maybrick, the Liverpudlian cotton merchant, might have done the crimes.... although I remain skeptical of both the Diary and Maybrick's candidacy as Jack the Ripper which still appears contrived to me.

                    While my work on the case might not be as extensive as some I do possibly have a fairly wide knowledge given that I edit and/or proofread most of the material that appears in Ripperologist. I might though admit that I am becoming bored stiff with some of the endless conversations about the graffito or who was or was not the best witness in Berner Street, and so on.

                    2. Biggest change in your belief system from the outset until now.....

                    Soon after I learned about the Maybrick Diary, I found out about another Ripper suspect with links to my adoptive city, Baltimore. An article appeared in the August 30, 1995 issue of the Baltimore Sun about Dr. Francis Tumblety which included quotes from co-authors Paul Gainey and Stewart P. Evans. Their book, The Lodger, had appeared in the UK but not at that date in the United States (it would later come out as Jack the Ripper: First American Serial Killer published by Kodansha International in 1998). I can't say that I was totally bowled over by Tumblety as a suspect although retired Chief Inspector Littlechild's claim in the letter of 1913 to G. R. Sims that the quack was a "very likely suspect" was at the least very intriguing.

                    I was pleased to increase my knowledge of the Ripper case both through studying the A to Z and to access the Internet where I met such people as Dave Yost, Christopher-Michael DiGrazia, the late Adrian M. Phypers, Paul Begg, and Stewart Evans in the old Casebook chat room. This led Dave, CMD and myself and several others to forming Casebook Productions, as a kind of adjunct to Casebook. We began Ripper Notes in May 1999 and sponsored the first American Jack the Ripper convention in Park Ridge, New Jersey in April 2000, with Paul Begg and serial killer expert Stephen Milhaud as our guests of honor.

                    I can't say my belief system has changed since the mid-1990's when I first became involved in the case. Rather, I have never been entirely convinced by any single suspect and found any argument in favor of a single suspect in itself somewhat "suspect" and contrived. So, for example, Paley's argument that Joe Barnett killed Mary Jane Kelly -- what because he was adept at cutting up fish? Or that Tumblety was adept with a knife either... he called himself a doctor but this probably misleads a lot of people because his "doctoring" was done with herbs and pills and he seems instead to have had an aversion toward using knives. The notion that Sickert may have painted clues in his artwork that he committed the Ripper murders. Really, I think he just painted seedy bedrooms, didn't he... and wasn't he in Dieppe at the time? Etc etc.

                    3. Favorite area of research (Debate, aspects of the Case, suspect-oriented research, attempts at a solution, newspaper trawling, research on a specific individual or individuals, out of box thinking, and so on and so forth.... )

                    What I love most is the side alleys of Ripperology, the study of the lives of the people who were touched by the case. In many of the articles I have written for Ripper Notes and Ripperologist, and in my talks and Casebook blog postings, I have concentrated on less well studied aspects of the case and the era, such as writing about Sir Samuel Montague (the Jewish M.P. for Whitechapel and Tower Hamlets), Sir Samuel Brighouse (the Lancashire coroner who oversaw the Maybrick and Deeming inquests -- I must have a thing for Samuels!), the suicidal Metropolitan Police Constable Richard Brown, and the poetry of City of London Policeman George Hutt (known as "The Police Poet"), the Jewish aspects of the case, and Sir Augustus Harris (or maybe it's a thing for "Sirs"???), the Anglo-Jewish entrepreneur who had a big West End hit and extravaganza in 1888 called "The Spanish Armada."

                    None of the research that I have so far carried out will bring us any closer to knowing who the Ripper was -- in fact, I am fairly convinced that we may never know his identity. At least, however, I think I may be helping to educate readers and audiences to the era and to its many interesting aspects, as are I think researchers such as Neil Bell and Rob Clack with their well-researched series on London policemen and police surgeons of the day and David O'Flaherty and his co-authors on the coroners involved in the Ripper case.

                    Best regards

                    Chris
                    Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
                    https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

                    Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
                    Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      1. How long have you been involved in research on a steady and serious basis ?
                      A little over nine years. 55-60 hours a week and every day without fail.

                      2. Biggest change in your belief system from the outset until now.....
                      Its far more enjoyable and educational to study the Case rather than make any attempt to solve it knowing new information surfaces on a regular basis.

                      3. Favorite area of research
                      Newspapers...
                      To Join JTR Forums :
                      Contact [email protected]

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Wow, it seems like everyone has bowed out of the hunt for the Ripper's identity. I'm glad I'm still on the trail.

                        I must say, this case is damn lucky to have me.

                        Yours truly,

                        Tom Wescott

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Tom_Wescott View Post
                          I must say, this case is damn lucky to have me.
                          And we all consider ourselves blessed to have met you.
                          Best regards,
                          Maria

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Tom_Wescott View Post

                            I must say, this case is damn lucky to have me.

                            Yours truly,

                            Tom Wescott
                            I'm sure Jack the Ripper said exactly the same thing.

                            .
                            Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
                            https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

                            Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
                            Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              1. How long have you been involved in research on a steady and serious basis ?

                              -Never, well off and on since 1988.

                              2. Biggest change in your belief system from the outset until now.....

                              -That people are basically decent, although that doesn't have to do with my Ripper studies, but the JTR case confirms that there are some evil, sick and just plain mean folks running around in our world.

                              3. Favorite area of research

                              The society and world JTR was born in and killed in, and his world's reaction to his mayhem. The Victims mainly. I do love to theorize too. Warning you all now.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X