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Pennington St. in Old Bailey Cases 1880-1895

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  • Pennington St. in Old Bailey Cases 1880-1895

    Some interesting cases with exact addresses on Pennington St. (If my files are working.) Guess they are. From 1891, about the time Mary McCarthy had unfortunates on the census entry.
    Attached Files
    The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

  • #2
    Replying to myself and hoping to drag something else out of files... I think this is a clip from my first post. I clipped some short paragraphs because sometimes the bigger pages won't transfer here.
    Attached Files
    The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

    Comment


    • #3
      Hope and pray this one comes through. This will be a paragraph from an EXTREMELY interesting case....possibly JtR's first crime... Therefore we may be able to tie JtR to Pennington St. and MJK. Or not...
      Attached Files
      The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

      Comment


      • #4
        Not sure if I should keep posting like this, but doubt I could get it all on one page. Hopefully this will be JtR's first crime. He would have been out in time to create the autumn of terror in 1888.

        IT POSTED! It would not yesterday. Now doesn't this sound like the beginning for JtR? (Hopefully everyone knows me well enough to know that is tongue in cheek.)
        Attached Files
        The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

        Comment


        • #5
          Think there are one or two more. Here goes...

          Ah, yes, 97 Pennington Street, however that fits in...
          Attached Files
          The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks, Anna. I'm familiar with the last case, but not the other two.

            The Rose McCarthy of the Brescher Case is almost certainly the Mary McC of the 1891 census, her full name was Rose Mary MCCarthy.

            Presumably Sarah Angelo was one of her girls.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
              Thanks, Anna. I'm familiar with the last case, but not the other two.

              The Rose McCarthy of the Brescher Case is almost certainly the Mary McC of the 1891 census, her full name was Rose Mary MCCarthy.

              Presumably Sarah Angelo was one of her girls.
              Can we assume Rose Mary (Mc)Carthy occupied or owned, what, #1 Breezers-Hill, going back to probably about 1886 through at least 1891? That #1 Breezers-Hill was VERY adjacent to #79 Pennington Street?

              So no matter that J. Morgenstern may have used the 79 P-Street address in 1885? That would have no bearing on Mrs. Buki, possibly with Morgenstern, in St. Georges Street?

              If I have sorted this correctly, it proves what Debra points out in the other thread.

              Wonder who lived in/owned #1 Breezers-Hill in the 1881 census? Any connexions from them to others that follow? If we understand this tiny chunk of geography near the London Docks, in the end we may learn a great deal about Mary's life and associates.
              The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Anna Morris View Post
                Can we assume Rose Mary (Mc)Carthy occupied or owned, what, #1 Breezers-Hill, going back to probably about 1886 through at least 1891? That #1 Breezers-Hill was VERY adjacent to #79 Pennington Street?

                So no matter that J. Morgenstern may have used the 79 P-Street address in 1885? That would have no bearing on Mrs. Buki, possibly with Morgenstern, in St. Georges Street?

                If I have sorted this correctly, it proves what Debra points out in the other thread.

                Wonder who lived in/owned #1 Breezers-Hill in the 1881 census? Any connexions from them to others that follow? If we understand this tiny chunk of geography near the London Docks, in the end we may learn a great deal about Mary's life and associates.
                Rose McCarthy didn't marry until 1889 and at that time gave her address as 7, Pennington Street, at least that was how it was recorded. Trouble is, there was no number 7, the numbers started at 79.

                1, BH and 79, PS were originally one premises, the Red Lion pub, but were later subdivided. I'm not sure if the two halves were built at the same time. The 79 PS bit existed long before the 1, BH bit was built, but whether it was just added to 79, PS, or was completely rebuilt, I'm not sure.

                The occupants in 1881 were two (apparently) respectable working families. Between 83/88 a man named Stephen Maywood and his family were at no. 1. He was a bit of a dodgy character, but I don't have him pegged as someone who lived off immoral earnings.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
                  Rose McCarthy didn't marry until 1889 and at that time gave her address as 7, Pennington Street, at least that was how it was recorded. Trouble is, there was no number 7, the numbers started at 79.

                  1, BH and 79, PS were originally one premises, the Red Lion pub, but were later subdivided. I'm not sure if the two halves were built at the same time. The 79 PS bit existed long before the 1, BH bit was built, but whether it was just added to 79, PS, or was completely rebuilt, I'm not sure.

                  The occupants in 1881 were two (apparently) respectable working families. Between 83/88 a man named Stephen Maywood and his family were at no. 1. He was a bit of a dodgy character, but I don't have him pegged as someone who lived off immoral earnings.
                  On the number 7 that didn't exist, you are probably more familiar than me with the European ways of making 1 and 7. I bet the 7 was always intended as 1.

                  For the name, we see many examples of men taking wives' names, wives keeping maiden and former married names. You well know that in Wales Davies marry Davies marry David, David... I saw one Mary Davies marrying a David Davee, in an old paper of the time. McCarthy could marry MacCarthy.
                  The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Anna Morris View Post
                    On the number 7 that didn't exist, you are probably more familiar than me with the European ways of making 1 and 7. I bet the 7 was always intended as 1.

                    For the name, we see many examples of men taking wives' names, wives keeping maiden and former married names. You well know that in Wales Davies marry Davies marry David, David... I saw one Mary Davies marrying a David Davee, in an old paper of the time. McCarthy could marry MacCarthy.
                    Rose McCarthy was Rose Brooks before she married. The 7 is definitely a 7, so perhaps it should have been 79 and the 9 was omitted. Either that or the address might have been 7, Pennington Place, Pennington Street.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I did a search on Joseph Brescher (post 1. below) and found something odd.

                      He seems to have married a Mathilde Thorson in Stepney in Sept Q 1899 and then a Marie Brown in STGITE in Sept Q 1911.

                      There is a death registered for a Matilda Brescher in Stepney in March Q 1900 and on his second marriage Brescher describes himself as a widow. It would appear that the poor lady didn't last long after she married the mad axe man.

                      Or did she? Two Ancestry trees have her dying in Norway in 1941 (she was Norwegian).

                      In 1916, Brescher was on a list of enemy aliens and it was stated that his wife was German and iving in Germany. Maria Brown's father was named Ludwig Carl Van (illegible)hausen, so obviously German.

                      Having recently spent a small fortune on certs for Shippies, Tomkins and Christophersons, I'm reluctant to send off for Matilda B's death cert. But it would be nice to know how she died and whether Joseph or a known address of his is mentioned.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I wonder if that's his second wife witnessing his first marriage.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
                          I wonder if that's his second wife witnessing his first marriage.
                          It could well be - curioser and curioser.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Rob,

                            Could you make out Maria's father's surname?


                            Gary

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi Gary


                              In 1901 he is listed as Harry and he's at 4 Beccles St, the house of what looks like the two marriage witnesses, John and Maria Brown.


                              I'll take a look at the German name - probably Von Klinkerhofen or something.

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