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December 2020

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  • December 2020

    the ripper and the royals - melvin fairclough

    aka joseph sickert tries to put the record straight.

    difficult to know where to start with this. essentially it is a form of hobo moving from stephen knight to another writer to expand upon the confusion. and sadly, this book ends up being phenomenally confused.

    the book is unashamedly a masonic/royal conspiracy, albeit PAV becomes portrayed very much as a victim for some reason.

    clarence is introduced to the reader, with chapter 2 outlining the canonical murders. it is pretty telling that this, the most important chapter is the 2nd shortest in the book. that should have been a red light, but wasn't. i persevered...

    there then follow a series of chapters loosely linking tales by joseph sickert, intertwined with a series of odd and tenuous royal and/or masonic anecdotes. except fairclough constantly ends up going off on tangents, repeately referring to asides. matters aren't helped when fairclough tries to give a background, which results in occasions where he gives a potted history of 200 years in a paragraph. frequently this relates to familial connections, so ends up reading like a biblical "x begat y begat z..." in a pretty pointless fashion. it also results in lists and series of names appearing, meaning the reader frequently loses track of the point supposedly being made, or who it relates to.

    sickert keeps dropping out miraculous new links that keeps fairclough interested.

    we then come to the revelation of abberlines diaries, except the chapter isn't about the diaries, it just gets exceptionally bizarre, and the tangents are more severe, with the links ever tenuous.

    we then have a complete breakdown, with the final 4 chapters alleging eddy lived for several decades a virtual prisoner, edward the 8th always intended to abdicate, and planned to do so years in advance, something odd about peter sutcliffe that has no purpose to the book, and then mjk survived anyway.

    there are so many things wrong with this book.the lack of proof reader (aberline/abberline/abbberline all appear, n's are frequently m's and vice versa, and so many others), and there are very strange mini clusters of sources/footnotes, followed by huge gaps.

    the main issue, related to the above, is that at least 75% of this book is unverifiable. at best it is hearsay, and half that is 2nd hand hearsay. i lost count of how many items of physical evidence sickert had, but someone else took. and at least 3 people referenced in the book by fairclough died immediately after he spoke with them. several also seemed to die just after making a disclosure to sickert.

    i'm actually annoyed i wasted so much time reading this.
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