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The Dear Boss Letter itself

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  • The Dear Boss Letter itself

    Courtesy of Victoriana Magazine - and a very clear copy.


  • #2
    It is a terrific copy, and shows that the writer of 'Dear Boss' was an educated person with good penmanship.

    Comment


    • #3
      Dear Boss

      The police deemed this letter to be genuine so had it published in the newspapers.

      Are there any photos of the original letter in a/or newspaper(s) of the day from 1888?

      Any info would be welcomed.

      Paul

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi Paul

        Yes the initial thought among the police was that Dear Boss was genuine but decades later senior police officials Sir Robert Anderson, Sir Melville Macnaghten, and Chief Inspector John George Littlechild wrote that it was known that a journalist was responsible for coining the famous name and faking the letter. A partial facsimile of the first "Dear Boss" letter was printed in the Daily Telegraph of October 4, 1888 along with the message side of the "Saucy Jack" postcard. And, more to the point, the Metropolitan Police themselves published a broadside of the "Dear Jack" and "Saucy Jack" Ripper communications, including the address on the "Dear Boss" envelope and the address side of the postcard, calling for people who recognized the handwriting to come forward. This turned out to be a bad mistake because it encouraged every sensation seeker in Britain and abroad to send their own "Ripper" letters to the authorities.

        Best regards

        Chris

        Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
        https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

        Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
        Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Paul and Chris,

          That's very interesting as the vast majority of British newspapers I've studied (for university or just out of interest) from the 19th century didn't contain a whole lot of images for the sake of saving on space - along with the printing technology of the day, or lack thereof. That was changing somewhat by JTR's time, but the fact that the "Dear Boss" and "Saucy Jacky" communications were given such attention certainly goes to highlight how important it was believed they might be at the time.

          Cheers,
          Adam.

          Comment


          • #6
            Photos

            Hi Adam,

            Would you know if there are any photos of the editor of the CNA, John Moore and the journalist, Thomas Bulling?

            I have searched everywhere, but cannot find photos of the two, especially as they are mentioned quite a bit in the JtR case.

            Many thanks,

            Paul

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Paul Sullivan View Post
              Hi Adam,

              Would you know if there are any photos of the editor of the CNA, John Moore and the journalist, Thomas Bulling?

              I have searched everywhere, but cannot find photos of the two, especially as they are mentioned quite a bit in the JtR case.

              Many thanks,

              Paul
              Hi Paul

              I have not seen such photographs despite having been interested in Moore and Bulling for some years. I am hoping that some of the intrepid researchers who post here can come up with such photographs.

              Best regards

              Chris
              Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
              https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

              Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
              Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Adam Went View Post
                Hi Paul and Chris,

                That's very interesting as the vast majority of British newspapers I've studied (for university or just out of interest) from the 19th century didn't contain a whole lot of images for the sake of saving on space - along with the printing technology of the day, or lack thereof. That was changing somewhat by JTR's time, but the fact that the "Dear Boss" and "Saucy Jacky" communications were given such attention certainly goes to highlight how important it was believed they might be at the time.

                Cheers,
                Adam.
                Hi Adam

                Late nineteenth century newspapers and magazines lacked the technology to publish photographs. Nonetheless they could publish engravings and wood block engravings. They did though have a process to publish facsimiles of documents, as the Daily Telegraph did on October 4, 1888 in publishing the partial facsimile of "Dear Boss" and the message side of the "Saucy Jack" postcard.

                Best regards

                Chris

                P.S. We missed you at RipperCon in Baltimore and look forward to seeing you hopefully at RipperCon 2018!
                Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
                https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

                Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
                Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi Paul,

                  Unfortunately I'm not aware of any photographs of either of those men, although I suspect that there must be at least one somewhere, especially of Thomas Bulling. Journalists and editors in the 1880's were busy trying to run their own various agendas and trying to keep up with the famous (or infamous) news men of the day such as W.T. Stead. I shall keep an eye out!

                  Hi Chris,

                  Thanks for that. I do remember seeing some smaller imagery in the later 19th century newspapers - I believe it was the Daily Mail that started printing little drawings of boats in their shipping news section around that time. Headlines got bigger too. Other publications such as The Times, however, were seemingly intent on squeezing as much print into the smallest space as they possibly could!

                  Cheers,
                  Adam.

                  P.S. Yes, no excuses for not attending in 2018!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Is there any information about when the tear in the letter happened?

                    I mean the piece missing on the righthand side, with the word "now" and the "art" from "start".

                    On the NA site, there's no tear, colours different - is that taken off the paper facsimile?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I think I'm the only guy in California who still owns a VCR. Last night, I played one of my old tapes on it. The tape was a documentary that featured the Dear Boss Letter. During the show, the historian Andrew Cook focused on a journalist named Frederick Best as having been the writer of the letter. The narrator of the program made this comment:

                      The letter had been sent to the Central News Agency an organization which syndicated news stories around the world. It was argued that only a journalist was likely to know about such an institution.

                      The date of 25 Sept, 1888 appeared at the top of the letter, so we're coming up on its anniversary.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm interested to know how many facsimile versions of the letter and postcard may have existed, if anyone has any information? I'm wondering about a version I've seen where the word 'whores' is covered over by a large splodge of ink. I have looked at the 88 newspaper versions and it isn't one of those but it was said to have come from a police source.

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                        • #13
                          Debs:

                          Interesting observation, Debs.....any particular reason or idea you might have as to why there's a blotch on that 'version' ?
                          xxxxx
                          To Join JTR Forums :
                          Contact Howard@jtrforums.com

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
                            Debs:

                            Interesting observation, Debs.....any particular reason or idea you might have as to why there's a blotch on that 'version' ?
                            xxxxx
                            No, How, it's just a version I have come across while researching for the A to Z that I wondered the origin of. In 1888 a facsimile version was printed in some newspapers but it isn't that version, this is 40 years later. I don't really have good knowledge of how the facsimile versions were done and how many different versions there may be so was hoping for some insight to help me understand. It may have been a blip caused by the printing process when it was produced , that's the kind of thing I'm interested in finding out.

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                            • #15
                              Oh,okay Debs.....
                              To Join JTR Forums :
                              Contact Howard@jtrforums.com

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