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  • Dear Boss letter...

    I know the letters are yet another controversial piece of this enormous jigsaw but I recently re-read the dear boss letter and wondered what the word 'buckled' meant.

    'I shant quit ripping them til I do get buckled' - from the letter...

    I was musing over the word buckled, and wondered if it does mean 'caught' as in by the police, or bucked as in tied up, maybe tied up in a mental asylum...am pondering over if it was a popular word that had meaning in the late 1800's... and what that meaning was...

  • #2
    Calling How! Help!

    Bugger, just realised there is a topic for the letters elsewhere...How, do you want to move this thread to its appropriate home???

    Cheers..

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    • #3
      Hi Currebell

      I'm pretty certain it refers to the handcuffing by the police, indirectly it means "arrested"

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      • #4
        Request granted Sarah.
        Jon

        "It is far more comfortable to point a finger and declare someone a devil, than to call upon your imagination to try to understand their world."


        http://www.jlrees.co.uk



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        • #5
          Thanks Nemo/Jon

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          • #6
            BUCKLED Is From Shakespeare!

            Hi, guys; mind if I jump in? I love Shakespeare, and I thought you might be interested to know that he uses the word 'BUCKLED' a number of times in his plays- it means ''To Bend'' or ''To Give Way Under Force.'' For example the phrase:

            ''Like strengthless hinges
            Buckle under Life
            ''
            (Henry IV, Pt 2)

            Variants of 'Buckle' recall the weapon-related phrase ''Sword & Buckler.''
            ''BUCKLE'' Means ''To Contend With'' and is often used as a verb denoting Combat, for example:

            ''My ancient incantations are too weak
            And Hell too strong for me to buckle with
            ''
            (Henry VI, Pt 2)

            If you want to get slightly more low-brow, there's a really obscure Shakespearean word, 'Bubuckle,' which seems to derive from 'Buboe' of Bubonic Plague Fame; it means 'Pimple'!
            (Sorry; I forget which play it's from; probably Henry IV again as it has loads of rude personal insults.)

            Isn't Shakespeare sublime? - Best regards, Archaic

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            • #7
              Jump in!

              Thanks for the info, I love Shakespeare, more so after studying several of his plays, Othello and Henry V are amazing...

              So buckled is obviously a word thats hundreds of years old, I wonder though if its meaning has changed over time, you know like the word gay meant happy and now refers to a homosexual?

              Or could the Ripper have been a fan of the Bard, maybe came from south of the river and was well educated and literate?!

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              • #8
                Shakespeare ROCKS!

                Hi, Currerbell, glad we can bond over Shakespeare!
                I asked for a Complete Shakespeare Anthology for my 12th Birthday- and a BB Gun! Guess I was a bit of a tom-boy.
                The first professional live Shakespeare Play I ever saw was King Henry IV, and I was utterly captivated by the character Hotspur- years later I discovered that he was my direct ancestor! Henry Percy, Earl of Northumberland... Maybe there are a few empty castles that need inheriting?? (Wouldn't mind the one they used in Harry Potter; apparently the current owners aren't even related to the Percys.)

                Back to your question, there are various other Shakespearean references within the ''Ripper Letters.'' I personally believe they were written by a literate individual posing as an illiterate one. - Best regards, Archaic

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Currerbell View Post
                  Jump in!

                  Thanks for the info, I love Shakespeare, more so after studying several of his plays, Othello and Henry V are amazing...

                  So buckled is obviously a word thats hundreds of years old, I wonder though if its meaning has changed over time, you know like the word gay meant happy and now refers to a homosexual?

                  Or could the Ripper have been a fan of the Bard, maybe came from south of the river and was well educated and literate?!
                  The Globe and the other Elizabethan theatres were located south of the Thames, and of course a replica of the Globe has recently been built on the south bank, courtesy of the late American-born actor Sam Wanamaker and other enthusiastic parties. But I am not sure that people in the late Victorian period would know that unless they were a Shakespeare scholar. I am not convinced that the general person who attended Shakespeare's plays in the 1880's would be aware of that bit of background history.

                  Chris
                  Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
                  https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

                  Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
                  Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

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                  • #10
                    Pleasure to meet a descendant (bows graciously)

                    Im going out now but will be back soon to chat with you on Shakespeare/Ripper, Archaic...

                    Send a message to my crib if you want, incase we are diverting this thread onto Early English Drama!!

                    Chris - Im a fan of his daughter Zoe....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Currerbell View Post
                      So buckled is obviously a word thats hundreds of years old, I wonder though if its meaning has changed over time, you know like the word gay meant happy and now refers to a homosexual?

                      Or could the Ripper have been a fan of the Bard, maybe came from south of the river and was well educated and literate?!
                      The word "buckled" in the Ripper letter represents a different usage of the word, Bell - not related to the Elizabethan meaning.

                      The word has meant different things over time, whether in slang or formal English. Even now, it can mean "to warp", "to fold", or "to fasten". It's almost certainly in the latter sense (in terms of being clapped in handcuffs, locked in a cell, or even strait-jacketed) that "Jack" would have meant it.

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                      • #12
                        re: Buckled

                        Hi, Sam! Regarding the word 'Buckled':
                        So do you feel that 'To Warp' or 'To Fold' or 'To Be Disarmed & Imprisoned' has an entirely different meaning and origin than
                        'To Bend' or 'To Be Forced To Give Way'?

                        Their derivation & usage seems very similar to me, though certainly it has evolved the past 400 years, especially in their slang usages.

                        A modern dictionary I just checked says ''An Instance of Bending or Warping,'' which actually combines both our answers.

                        Another says ''To Bend or To Fasten with a Clasp'' -also a combination of both.

                        Next: ''To Give Way, Give In or Crumple Under Pressure.''

                        Next: ''To Be Confined With A Clasp.''

                        I think they're awfully close and follow logically from one usage to the next.
                        Best regards, Archaic
                        Last edited by Archaic; May 20, 2009, 01:38 AM. Reason: typo

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                        • #13
                          As there are only as few letters that we know of, that were 'supposedly' sent by the Ripper, does anyone have any thoughts on why these were kept and not others, considering hundreds were meant to be sent to the police and the newspapers, what makes these few special??? Why werent any others kept?

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                          • #14
                            Much has been made of the word "boss" as used in the letters, being American. That makes sense in the context but I just discovered something by accident.

                            Since some of our research has led to Dutch immigrants, the word for "boss" in Dutch is "baas". Our word comes from the Dutch. "Dear Boss" would be "Beste Baas" in Dutch. Baas comes from "baes" meaning master and a few other things and has a German equivalent.

                            To me, the "Dear" part makes the letter greeting less American in character. I think more in terms of "The Boss", the top man, etc.

                            Maybe this is a stretch and maybe not. It is something to think about. I got the idea by watching videos* with Dutch subtitles and "baas" kept coming up for chief, leader, etc.

                            *(Yes, Gary, I do end up quoting "Dad's Army." The best colorized version has Dutch subtitles.)
                            The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

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