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The Lusk Letter Analyzed

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Good work, Stephen.....thanks for the side-by-side comparision.

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  • Curryong
    replied
    Yeah, the I's and s's are completely different and Tumblety's crossing of his t's with an extraordinarily long stroke is very distinctive. It's interesting isn't it that the writer 'from hell', (whom I've believed for 30 years to be the killer) doesn't sign himself Jack. Not giving the 'trade name' was a repudiation maybe.

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  • Tom_Wescott
    replied
    You're spot on, Stephen Collyer. Tumblety didn't write the From Hell letter.

    Yours truly,

    Tom Wescott

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  • Stephen Collyer
    replied


    If that is a genuine example of Tumblety's handwriting then I don't really see much of a match.
    I instinctively think that the Lusk letter is written by the killer, for several solid reasons which have already been mentioned many many times.

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Dear Curryong:
    George Lusk wasn't Jewish, an easy assumption to make because many of the members of the Mile End cadre were Jews.
    The lisping 'Mishter' has been associated more with an Irish accent, if I recall.
    Welcome once again !

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  • Curryong
    replied
    Yes, so do you, Anna! I wonder where...?

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  • Anna Morris
    replied
    Hi, Curryong! Welcome...you seem familiar...

    I think the letter writer was trying to be deliberately misleading, probably while drunk.

    Did I misspell "Juewes" in my last post. I think that debacle just has to do with rapid, sloppy writing possibly in the dark.

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  • Curryong
    replied
    Thanks for the welcome. I have a few strange hobbies!

    I was thinking today of the anti-semitism that was rife throughout East London at this particular period, and speculating that maybe the writer (JTR or not) was doing a bit of nasty taunting.

    Knowing that Lusk was Jewish, as were other members of the Vigilance Committee, could the writer have been having a go with 'Mishter' and imitating a stereotypical Jewish lisp?

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  • Anna Morris
    replied
    So could we guess the fellow who wrote "Sor" could also have written "Jewes"? Something to think about there.

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  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Originally posted by Curryong View Post
    Education in Victoria's reign is one of my strange hobbies.
    Not as strange as some of us around here, and one which should stand you in good (WT) stead to contribute to our discussions. Welcome to the forum

    Leave a comment:


  • Curryong
    replied
    What strikes me every time I see the Lusk letter is how English, or at least British, it is. In spite of the writer's illiteracy, which I don't believe is feigned at all, (ink blots, spelling mistakes, words sliding into each other,) there is no sign of foreign phrasing at all.

    There's even a weird sort of copybook flavour about it. A man vaguely remembering his schooldays and lessons on how to compose a letter. Right heading--put the address (from hell) Left heading--to the recipient Mr Lusk then, as in a business letter, Sir (or Sor.)

    Mr, with the r written up high against the M is common in Victorian English and was taught that way in school. (I've seen dozens of examples. (Education in Victoria's reign is one of my strange hobbies.)

    I also believe our letter writer enjoyed going to 'penny gaffs' and seeing stage Irishmen. He's clearly throwing out false clues with his 'Sor' and 'Mishter'. I don't think he cares about the appearance of this letter at all, and I agree that he was probably having a drinking session when he wrote it.

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  • Robert Linford
    replied
    I see a certain humour in this letter - the idea that Lusk was waiting desperately for the bloody knife. A bit like the police wanting Kate's ears.

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  • Belladonna
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris G. View Post
    The non-closing of the "o" in "Sor" and "From hell" as well as the untidy, blotted nature of the writing could be a good indication that the writer was drunk when they wrote it, which might fit in with the writer having been a prankster rather than a cold-hearted killer.

    Chris
    Or that he had the tother half of the kidnae with with a nice chianti

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  • Chris G.
    replied
    The non-closing of the "o" in "Sor" and "From hell" as well as the untidy, blotted nature of the writing could be a good indication that the writer was drunk when they wrote it, which might fit in with the writer having been a prankster rather than a cold-hearted killer.

    Chris

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  • Belladonna
    replied
    After my epiphany I am convinced it is "Sor".

    If it's not sor I think we have to change the title of this letter to the "Frim hell" letter.

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