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Left-handed but right-handed: Henry Maxwell Reily

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Kristina Nordqvist View Post
    According to Bond the women must have been lying down when they were killed. In the post-mortem report of Llewellyn, the physician stated that the killer had been in front of the victim. Phillips also stated that there was no physical sign of any fall backwards in the case of Alice MacKenzie.

    The earliest report of the mutilations on Annie Chapman was given the same day, 8th December 1888, by Inspector Joseph Chandler from H Division.

    Annie Chapman was found lying on her back with her left arm resting on the left breast and her legs drawn up.

    The abdomen was cut open and the small intestines were abducted from the abdomen. They were placed over the right shoulder of the victim, attached by a cord to the rest of the intestines inside of the body.

    A flap of the abdomen was also placed above the right shoulder of the victim.

    Sitting in front of the victim or a little to her right, Henry Maxwell Reily was able to raise his left arm and pull out the intestines from the abdomen of Annie Chapman with his left hand and place them on the right shoulder of the victim.

    He was not able to raise his right hand high up in the air while pulling something out with strength.

    He was not able to take out the intestines and place them above the right shoulder of the victim with his right hand, due to the wound in his shoulder.

    Two flaps of skin from the lower part of the abdomen of the victim were lying above her left shoulder.

    Henry had the ability to hold his right hand straight forward and to move it to the right and left while holding a lighter object in his right hand.

    He was able to hold a flap of skin and place it above the left shoulder of Annie Chapman by holding his right arm straight forward towards the left side and shoulder of the victim.

    Chris, when you say ‘sitting’ in front of the victim do you mean sitting on the victim? Sitting at her head? Sitting at her feet?

    Where was Henry sat when he disembowelled Annie Chapman?

    (Don’t put that dictionary away just yet.)

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
      Chris, when you say ‘sitting’ in front of the victim do you mean sitting on the victim? Sitting at her head? Sitting at her feet?

      Where was Henry sat when he disembowelled Annie Chapman?

      (Don’t put that dictionary away just yet.)
      Sitting between the legs of the victim or a little to the right side of the victim beside or on the right leg.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Kristina Nordqvist View Post
        Sitting between the legs of the victim or a little to the right side of the victim beside or on the right leg.
        Sitting?

        Are you sure you don’t mean squatting, crouching or kneeling?

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
          Sitting?

          Are you sure you don’t mean squatting, crouching or kneeling?
          If you do mean sitting, then the direction in which Henry’s legs were pointing is very significant: N. S. E. or W.?

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Kristina Nordqvist View Post
            Sitting between the legs of the victim or a little to the right side of the victim beside or on the right leg.
            Chapman’s legs were drawn up weren’t they? Was Henry sitting on her right knee?

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            • #51
              The sources really are hopeless here.

              But never fear, they can be manipulated to show anything you want.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Kattrup View Post
                I think I do. She’s saying that the reason some medical examiners thought some cuts were made by a left-handed person and some by a right-handed was because HMR used both hands.

                Thanks. I did ask her in the first place whether that was what she meant.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by Chris Phillips View Post
                  Thanks. I did ask her in the first place whether that was what she meant.
                  Indeed, and I also described how he used his left hand and his right hand.

                  With his left hand, Henry Maxwell Reily was able to hold a pointed spear and attack moving targets from horseback with it while he was riding. He was able to stab an animal multiple times and to pull out the spear after having killed the animal.

                  With his left hand, he was able to use great strength in attacking, wounding and killing his prey. With his left arm, he was also capable of raising the spear high up in the air and to position it in different directions as he was riding.

                  There were also some abilities that Henry did not possess with his left hand which were not disabilities, but non abilities, since he was originally right-handed.

                  He was not able to write with his left hand, or to perform all sorts of tasks with his left hand without the help of his right hand.

                  With his right hand, Henry Maxwell Reily was able to write on a paper lying in front of him, to ride a horse for a long distance while hunting and killing animals, holding the reins and pressing his right thumb firmly down on the reins.

                  Henry consequently managed to hold an object in a steady grip with his right hand, to put pressure on objects, to press something down quickly on a low level, to pull things towards himself and to push things away from himself on a low level.

                  He was able to perform tasks with some strength without raising his right arm high up in the air, and he was able to move the right hand to the left and right, and to raise the hand to some extent. He had the ability to hold his right arm straight forward, to move his right arm to the right and left, to hold an object in the right hand, and to raise his arm to a limited extent.

                  Henry Maxwell Reily was not able to raise his right hand up in the air or to raise it high up with a weapon in his hand. He did not have the ability to raise his arm high up in the air in order to stab something from above with great strength.

                  He had trained his left hand and left arm for a long time, and the strength and skill he had developed in his left hand since the accident in Garo Hills, where his right shoulder was wounded, was considerable. Not only was he able to use his left hand with great strength, but also with precision, when he was hunting and killing a moving target from horseback.

                  His ability to injure and kill with his left hand was higher compared to right-handed persons who had not been forced to train their left hand and left arm in order to compensate for the loss of strength and movement in the right arm.

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                  • #54
                    I always thought the killer held the face of the victim in one hand and cut with the other. (Some had small bruises on the faces.) By turning the head/face in certain directions, the major arteries and veins are most available for quick and deadly work.
                    The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

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                    • #55
                      The murder of Elizabeth Stride

                      Originally posted by Kattrup View Post
                      I think I do. She’s saying that the reason some medical examiners thought some cuts were made by a left-handed person and some by a right-handed was because HMR used both hands.

                      Due to his injury he had some limited mobility in his right hand. Therefore he had to use his left hand to a greater extent than other right-handed persons.

                      Chris seeks to apply this to the wound patterns on the victims. For instance, Nichols had abdominal cuts on her right side. Chris finds this consistent with the killer crouching over her, facing her directly, and using his left hand to cut Nichols.
                      And all the murders and mutilations can be explained with his left-handedness and right-handedness, i.e. from his abilities and disabilities. He was not "ambidextrous" but he had been wounded in his right shoulder, and therefore he used his right hand and left hand differently in specific situations.

                      The murder of Elizabeth Stride is an interesting research example.

                      Two physicians examined the victim Elizabeth Stride. The first physician was surgeon Frederick William Blackwell and the second one was Dr George Bagster Phillips.

                      Blackwell had formed the opinion that the killer had first taken hold of the scarf around the neck of the victim, at the back of the scarf, and that he had pulled the victim backwards.

                      According to Blackwell, the scarf was also slightly frayed on the lower edge, as by a sharp knife.

                      Phillips thought that the victim was lying down when the throat was cut, and that the killer was on the right side of the victim when he inflicted the throat cut.However, there were no bruises on the face of Elizabeth Stride.

                      Henry Maxwell Reily was able to take hold of a scarf around the neck of a victim with his left hand, and pull the victim backwards using his left arm and hand with great strength.

                      He was able to stand on the right side of the victim and pull her backwards, while lowering her down to facilitate a more superficial throat cut with his right hand.

                      From the position by the right side of the victim, the lower edge of the scarf and the throat were both visible, a fact which facilitated a throat cut from left to right just below the line of the scarf. The scarf was slightly frayed on the lower edge.

                      According to the physician, surgeon William Frederick Blackwell, the victim’s throat had been cut from left to right. However, there was only a partial severance of the carotid artery on the left side of the throat. The artery was not completely severed.

                      Henry Maxwell Reily was not able to use his right hand with great strength. The strength in his right hand was limited. The throat cut had not severed the vessels on the right side. Dr Phillips, who also examined the throat cut, pointed out that the cut on the right side was more superficial.

                      According to Dr Phillips, the throat cut also deviated a little downwards.

                      Henry was able to hold an object in his right hand in a steady grip, to put pressure on things, to move his right hand to the right and left and to raise his right arm a little. He had some, but limited, strength in his right hand.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Nichols, Chapman and McKenzie

                        Originally posted by Anna Morris View Post
                        I always thought the killer held the face of the victim in one hand and cut with the other. (Some had small bruises on the faces.) By turning the head/face in certain directions, the major arteries and veins are most available for quick and deadly work.
                        Llewellyn reported that the cuts on the body of Mary Ann Nichols had been done by a left-handed person. At the murder inquest the day after the murder, Llewellyn also testified and stated that, from the nature of the cuts on the throat of the victim, it was probable that they were inflicted with the left hand.

                        There was a mark, according to the physician, at the point of the jaw on the right side of the face of the victim, as though made by a person’s thumb, and there was a similar bruise on the left side, indicating that the head of the victim had been pushed back and her throat then cut.

                        The same bruising observed on the jaw of Mary Ann Nichols had also been observed by PC Neil when he gave his first report, on the day of the murder, of what he saw at the murder site.

                        Henry Maxwell Reily was able to use his right hand with some strength without raising his arm high up in the air. With his right hand, he was able to hold an object in a steady grip and to put pressure on an object, to push something away from him on a low level and to press his thumb down firmly.

                        He was able to hold his right hand over the mouth of a victim by holding his arm straight out in front of him.

                        According to Henry’s abilities and disabilities, it was necessary to be positioned in front of a victim or by her right side, when she was lying on the ground, to be able to kill the victim by cutting her throat from left to right.

                        To be able to use this position he must hold the knife in his left hand and cut the throat of the victim from left to right with great strength after having placed the right hand over her mouth and jaw.

                        As in the case of Mary Ann Nichols, the victim Annie Chapman had bruises on her face. The bruises were evidently recent.

                        On the left side of the lower jaw, there were scratches one and a half to two inches below the lobe of the ear, and they were going in the contrary direction to the incisions in the throat. There were also corresponding bruises on the left side and the right side.

                        Henry Maxwell Reily was able to perform tasks with his right hand with some strength without raising his arm high up in the air. He was able to hold an object in a steady grip and to put pressure on it, to push something away from him on a lower level and to press his thumb down firmly. Henry was able to hold his right arm straight out in front of him.

                        Due to the wound in the right shoulder it was necessary for Henry to be positioned in front of a victim, or a little to her right side, to be able to kill her by cutting her throat with his left hand.

                        To be able to kill Annie Chapman from this position, he must hold the knife in his left hand and cut her throat from left to right with great strength after having placed his right hand over her mouth and jaw. From this position he was able to dissever a throat deeply with his left hand.

                        The comparison of the abilities and disabilities of Henry Maxwell Reily to the description of the throat cut on the victim Annie Chapman shows the same result as in the case of the murder on Mary Ann Nichols, although the victims were examined by two different physicians and although they did both give their own descriptions of the injuries.

                        In both cases the throat of the victim had been cut from left to right, and in both cases there were bruises on their faces.

                        The coroner at the inquest of Annie Chapman also remarked that the similarities between the two victims Mary Ann Nichols and Annie Chapman were considerable.

                        And also Alice McKenzie: Dr Phillips stated that the body had been held down by a hand, as was evidenced by bruises on the upper chest and collar bone of the victim. The marks on the left side of the abdomen were characteristic of a thumb and fingers. They compared in their position on the body to a right hand placed on the abdomen, pinching up a fold of skin for at least 3 inches.

                        There was also smearing of blood caused in this way. The marks on the left side of the abdomen were caused by the pressure of the right hand. The right wounds on the victim had been produced by a left-handed cut.

                        Henry Maxwell Reily was able to put pressure on objects with his right hand and to press something down on a low level with some strength without raising his right arm high up in the air. Henry was able to press his right hand with his thumb and fingers on the left side of the abdomen of the victim, in order to produce a left-handed cut.

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Kristina Nordqvist View Post
                          Indeed, and I also described how he used his left hand and his right hand.

                          [snipped another 10 paragraphs]

                          Brevity is a virtue, particularly when answering a simple either/or question.

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                          • #58
                            A severe shoulder injury causes quite a bit of disability. I follow the reasoning here but it is likely his right arm had limited movement and strength. I have a prosthetic shoulder following a trauma. I have a very limited range of motion and my ability to sustain any strong movements in that arm are questionable. I used to try to imagine how JtR operated and couldn't quite visualize it because it has been a long time since I had two fully functioning arms.
                            The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Anna Morris View Post
                              A severe shoulder injury causes quite a bit of disability. I follow the reasoning here but it is likely his right arm had limited movement and strength. I have a prosthetic shoulder following a trauma. I have a very limited range of motion and my ability to sustain any strong movements in that arm are questionable. I used to try to imagine how JtR operated and couldn't quite visualize it because it has been a long time since I had two fully functioning arms.

                              Exactly, I agree with everything you say. His right arm did have limited movement and strength.

                              When I analyzed the descriptions of the injuries made by the physicians, his abilities and disabilities turned out to explain the majority of the injuries on the victims, including the small stabs on the victims on their left side and the extensive cuts on their right side.

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