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So Who Was the Lady in Red?

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  • So Who Was the Lady in Red?

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/ar...ur-photos.html

    Would make a good avatar.


  • #2
    Debra Arif has had that as an avatar for some time now.
    To Join JTR Forums :
    Contact Howard@jtrforums.com

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    • #3
      I thought Debra's avi was from an old silent film. Maybe Mary Miles Minter on location on a beach commonly used in films in Malibu. I never saw the bigger version. Interesting story.
      The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

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      • #4
        I copied the whole set of O'Gorman autochromes housed at the Bradford Photographic museum a while back now. I just loved mood, and the vibrancy of the red colours in all the pictures is amazing. I have also spent some time in the past trying to discover who 'Christina' really was but haven't got very far.

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        • #5
          Here's another of the atmospheric beach ones that isn't shown in the Daily Mail selection. This has been used as a book cover for a couple of Romantic novels:

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          • #6
            Cameron

            Hello Debs. Lovely photographs.

            Hope you are a fan of Julia Margaret Cameron.

            Cheers.
            LC

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            • #7
              Hi Lynn, yes, some of her portrait studies are truly beautiful, plus she photographed the more 'mature' Alice Liddell . I think Alice appears quite masculine looking in the Cameron study of her.
              There's something about the early autochrome colour pictures that is magical though. There are several other early examples still in existence and something red is often used in them as it is the colour which always showed up best in the results.

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              • #8
                focus

                Hello Debs. Thanks.

                Have you figured precisely how she unfocused the camera for her distinctive look?

                Cheers.
                LC

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                • #9
                  Is that Durdle Door in the background?

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                  • #10
                    Meet the Lady in Red

                    http://flashbak.com/christina-in-red...ochrome-35937/



                    O’Gorman captures a timeless scene as his family eat their picnic on the beach in Dorset, with Durdle Door in the background. In 1897 O’Gorman had married Florence Rasch, who is sitting between their two daughters.

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                    • #11
                      The Pedant's Revolt

                      The image is reversed. Durdle Door should be on the left (East). Lovely image, though.

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                      • #12
                        I'll make a small comment/question about filming the color red which shows up in these photos.

                        If I use the wrong setting on my digital camera which does pretty much everything, I cannot get red or violet shades right and no amount of enhancing helps. My relative in the film industry says this is because of the wave length and that red and violet shades are the hardest to capture and get right. (I don't understand why with digital this should be so.)

                        So I'm wondering if the photographer who did the "Lady in Red" was working with special film or experimenting to get those red shades? The old films had some nasty glitches. The very old black and white was "blue blind" so blue eyed people tended to look like their eyes were white. Think Fatty Arbuckle or even some pictures of Lizzie Borden who was said to have had "grey" eyes though they frequently appear ice blue if we guessed the shade.

                        Cinematographer James Wong Howe finally overcame the blue blindness by experimenting with photographing actress Mary Miles Minter whose eyes were said to have been violet in color.
                        The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

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                        • #13
                          They are some of the first autochrome photographs in existence. Reds showed up particularly well in this new Edwardian era process of taking actual colour photographs, rather than tinting afterwards. The technique involved the use of dyed potato starch grains.

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                          • #14
                            I found something of extreme interest I think.

                            At: www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=8075.0 there is an ancestry discussion about O'Gorman's non existent daughter Christina. The general gist is O'Gorman and his wife married in middle age and the existing censuses list no children for the couple. This forum notes that there is, apparently in the same family, a Chrostina O'Gorman listed in the 1911 Irish census. She was 13 at that time. Her parents were James and Mary O'Gorman and they had 11 kids. The comment on this forum was they probably were happy to parcel off some of the kids to other relatives from time to time.

                            Could this be the answer to the original question, "Who was the lady in red", which began this thread?

                            If I have anything of interest here, someone mail it to the 'Daily Mail' or whoever asked the question in the first place. Give our forum here the credit...
                            The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

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                            • #15
                              A bromide print of Christina by Mervyn O'Gorman 1913

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