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Dr L S Forbes Winslow: Charlatan?

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  • Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
    Great find, Debs !! Thank you !
    Xxxx
    Cheers How. This is part of a set of type-written summaries of famous historical criminal cases included in the archive. It's not new information-wise but still interesting. The photographs, documents and newspaper clippings from 20's/30's/40's crimes included in this collection are the most interesting.

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    • James R. Wood, Jr. Walking down Street

      Pretty wayward drive if he's looking for his golf ball there.

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      • Great stuff, Debs.

        I'm not surprised his middle name was Rodney - he looks a bit of a plonker.

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        • You guys crack me up

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          • Hi Debs,

            An excellent find: keep them coming!

            Despite the wealth of published books on JtR I've always believed that there is still a considerable amount of untapped information out there, in fact I'm currently following up a promising lead on a certain Home Office official.

            My regards,

            Sean.

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            • Keep us filled in, Sean...and good luck !
              To Join JTR Forums :
              Contact Howard@jtrforums.com

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              • Originally posted by Sean Crundall View Post
                Hi Debs,

                An excellent find: keep them coming!

                Despite the wealth of published books on JtR I've always believed that there is still a considerable amount of untapped information out there, in fact I'm currently following up a promising lead on a certain Home Office official.

                My regards,

                Sean.
                Hi Sean. Thanks.
                Althpugh there isn't any startling new information, what impresses me about the typewritten summaries of James Rodney Wood (Jnr) is his accuracy and insight many years after the events. I haven't been able to pinpoint exactly when Wood wrote these summaries, he also wrote summaries on other famous cases like Crippen and Florence Maybrick. The pages are very well written and would have made a great book. I wonder if that was the intention?

                Exciting news about your lead, I hope it pans out for you and ditto to what How said.

                Debs x

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                • I accessed the Wood detective agency records (from the Harvard Law Library collection0 through the Gale/Infotrac database - 19th Century Criminals, Crime and Popular Culture but Jonathon Menges mentioned the Harvard Law Library itself had them available too. I googled and found some digitised parts of the Wood archive available to view on the Harvard site here:

                  http://oasis.lib.harvard.edu/oasis/deliver/~law00102

                  Enjoy!

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                  • What bothers me about the typed report is that it could be a total synopsis for the book "The Lodger." I am the last one to crow about Occam's Razor but that report reads like a complex work of fiction because every little detail is provided and explained. True crime seldom if ever can be described in such detail. We are always left with holes we can't fill in, even if murderers are caught and decide to talk.
                    The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

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                    • Originally posted by Anna Morris View Post
                      What bothers me about the typed report is that it could be a total synopsis for the book "The Lodger." I am the last one to crow about Occam's Razor but that report reads like a complex work of fiction because every little detail is provided and explained. True crime seldom if ever can be described in such detail. We are always left with holes we can't fill in, even if murderers are caught and decide to talk.
                      It's a summary of the murders followed by a summary of Forbes Winslow's well known and contemporary lodger theory, which J R Wood seems to have liked.. It's not a report written about any sort of investigation undertaken by Woods detectives. As mentioned in my post and the description of the material, the type written reports are summaries of historical crimes.
                      The interesting thing for me about the mention of Forbes Winslow's theory was that I have personally never seen a description of Forbes Winslow's suspect given in print before, despite him touting his theory to various newspapers. I imagine it must appear in one as I suspect Wood would have lifted his summary from newspaper articles etc.

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                      • Hi Debs,

                        It would be great if Mr Wood's typewritten crime summary on Jack the Ripper could be dated.

                        It does seem likely he was intending some future publication, a sort of compendium of notorious crimes.

                        It's also possible that he may have had professional contacts in London, who provided him with bits of information.

                        I'll keep you and How posted on any positive developments regarding the Home Office official.

                        Great work!

                        Warmest regards,

                        Sean X.

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                        • Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
                          Keep us filled in, Sean...and good luck !
                          Thanks, How!

                          I'll keep you posted if things pan out.

                          Best wishes,

                          Sean.

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                          • Sean, I wonder if the mention of his being lost in the labyrinth of streets bears the influence of the 1919 item about Sgt White?


                            http://www.casebook.org/forum/messages/4924/5870.html

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                            • Hi Robert,

                              It's possible, of course, that Wood accessed contemporary and later newspapers on the case, which may also account for some of the errors in his writing.

                              White's 1919 article betrays the hand of heavy journalistic influence, and is much in the style of E. T. Woodhall's writings.

                              Labyrinth is, I should think, pretty much a commonplace noun for describing the tortuous alleyways of the East End of the day. However, Wood could easily have read the White article.

                              A very interesting find.

                              My very best wishes,

                              Sean.

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