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  • 'Let Him Rest'

    East London Observer
    April 30, 1910
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  • #2
    Thanks for posting this. The ten years' penal servitude obviously refers to William Grant/Grainger, but I'm not sure about "driven out of the country". At the same time Forbes Winslow was touting a rival suspect, whom he claimed to have frightened away, though I can't see a specific claim that he'd left the country.

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    • #3
      Chris:

      Isn't the 'suspect' being referred to the man who wound up in Melbourne ?
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      • #4
        Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
        Chris:

        Isn't the 'suspect' being referred to the man who wound up in Melbourne ?

        I don't think it can be, because Forbes Winslow writes in "Recollections of Forty Years" that he didn't receive the letter about the Melbourne suspect until July 1910:
        https://www.casebook.org/ripper_media/rps.winslow.html

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        • #5
          Tumblety perhaps?

          Is Sims not being tongue-in-cheek, describing two different 'suspects' as the one 'wonderful chap', who was both sentenced to ten years and driven out of the country?

          Love,

          Caz
          X
          I wish I were two puppies then I could play together - Storm Petersen

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Caroline Brown View Post
            Tumblety perhaps?

            Is Sims not being tongue-in-cheek, describing two different 'suspects' as the one 'wonderful chap', who was both sentenced to ten years and driven out of the country?

            Love,

            Caz
            X

            Yes, my first thought was that he was combining what had been said about two different suspects, and as one is clearly William Grant/Grainger, it would make sense if the other was the suspect Forbes Winslow had been pushing in opposition, in the recent correspondence. Certainly the A-Z and other secondary sources say Winslow's theory was that his suspect had left the country. I just can't see it in any of his writings before the date of this piece. But probably it's there somewhere.

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            • #7
              There was a grisly murder in Paris that was widely reported in the UK press in March 1910, ie., a few weeks before Sims' article appeared. It was then noticed that another woman had been murdered in the same Parisian street in the early 1890s, and there was a vague suggestion that perhaps the Ripper had crossed The Channel around the time of the Francis Coles murder. (See below, Sheffield Telegraph, 3 March 1910--one among many). I think this is probably what Sims had in mind.

              The interesting thing is what Sims doesn't mention: Sir Robert Anderson's solution, which had gained wide publicity that same February/March. It's as if Sims is deliberately snubbing the Jewish theory by not even mentioning it (his readers would have been aware of it) and, by implication, it is dismissed as being no more consequential than the other 'false' solutions then making the rounds. Quite audacious, if you think about it--a journalist thumbing his nose at the former head of the C.I.D., but Sims often referred to having his own sources at Scotland Yard, and we now know that the primary one was Macnaghten.
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