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How Yorkshire Ripper was cossetted at a cost of ?10 Million

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  • How Yorkshire Ripper was cossetted at a cost of ?10 Million

    You can sort of excuse Frank Bruno for being an asshole....he had his bell rung a few too many times.

    Misogynist Convention :






    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...0-MILLION.html
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  • #2
    Front and centre of this well known photograph is no other that the late infamous a Sir Jimmy Savile.who'loved' women, especially young vulnerable ones.He would have been the one to orchestrate the meeting between Sutcliffe and Frank Bruno.

    I suspect that some of the reasoning behind this publicity stunt was the well publicised mental health issues that Bruno experienced in the form of a depressive illness. Mind you,as you say Frank wasn't the sharpest tool in the garden shed and having his brain rattled around his cranium wouldn't have helped his sorrows either..

    What I find disturbing is that anyone with any regard to the surviving victims, or the families of those women who were murdered would ever consider to allow this meeting to happen, However, that is what happens when the lunatics take over the running of an asylum.

    Starting in the mid seventies there was a move to 'demystify' institutions such as B'moor, a noble quest, but not without creating potential security breaches. In conclusion , It seems that there was no legal mechanism to strip Savile of either his knighthood or the Order of the British Empire( deceased) once the extent of his predacious sexual activities became known.
    Last edited by jachim3926; November 14, 2020, 05:57 PM. Reason: Modification
    Be nice to one another!
    Merv

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    • #3
      That's a pretty ridiculous article. The author doesn't even seem to know that the verdict of "guilty but insane" went out more than 50 years ago.


      As for the luxurious lifestyle - staying in bed until 8am at weekends, being allowed to sit in a comfortable chair, being allowed to talk to other inmates, being allowed to (by the sound of it) work in the kitchen? It makes me wonder how they think people should be treated in a psychiatric hospital - solitary confinement for life and a diet of bread and water?



      The Daily Mail should be reclassified as a comic.

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      • #4
        Thanks for the replies, gents.


        Do either of you believe Sutcliffe should have been in a psychiatric prison or in a joint like Strangeways ?


        Savile was a really greasy character...
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        • #5
          Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
          Thanks for the replies, gents.


          Do either of you believe Sutcliffe should have been in a psychiatric prison or in a joint like Strangeways ?


          Savile was a really greasy character...
          I don't know whether Sutcliffe should have been diagnosed as schizophrenic. I didn't even know he had been. If anyone here knows why he was, and/or thinks he shouldn't have been, I'd be interested to see the reasons.

          I just think that as he was diagnosed as schizophrenic it was right that he should be treated humanely. I think that even if he hadn't been diagnosed as schizophrenic, he should still have been treated humanely.

          I think that the things the Mail seems to object to - being allowed to stay in bed as late as 8am at weekends, being allowed to talk to other patients, being allowed to sit in a comfortable chair, being allowed to work in the kitchen and even being allowed to learn how to make pottery - aren't things that are inappropriate for any prisoner, no matter what they have done.

          Sorry but I just think the Daily Mail is a disgraceful rag that has no regard for truth, responsibility, or common decency. It will print any crap about anyone, without any regard for journalistic ethics, just to sell a few more newspapers.

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          • #6
            Thanks, Chris....much appreciated.
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            • #7
              Thanks How and Chris for your views.
              To start with, i must confess that I didn't initially read the Daily Mail article. Having now done so, I agree with you Chris that there is evidence of inaccuracy and sensationalism in the article, but that's what sells newspapers.,alas..

              If you recall at at the time of his trial the Judge and ultimately the jury refused to accept a plea of preexisting, or insanity at the times that the crimes were committed .Sutcliffe's defence raised the issue of mental incompetence after he had apparently claimed that he 'heard voices' during the time he was employed as a graver digger.

              No doubt the psychiatrist that made a pretrial assessment for the Crown ,or perhaps the one engaged by his defence lawyers would have questioned him about such areas of possible psychoses. Whether he received advice to make this central to plea is a matter for conjecture.

              Thus Sutcliffe entered the mainstream prison system devoid of any formal psychiatric diagnosis That situation was to remain until such time that he was
              he was examined by a psychiatrist at HMP Parkhurst.

              While it is possible that incarcerated individuals may develop psychotic symptoms, there is usually some accompanying behavioural issues that draw the attention to the custodial staff. In Sutcliffe's case it seems that his wasn't exactly a compliant inmate, My opinion for was it it worth he received the diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia a business class upgrade from that of a sexual psychopath. What I find odd is that auditory hallucinosis is not usually associated with paranoid schizophrenia.

              Maybe the condition arose for the maintenance of peace and quiet at Parkhurst and likely for his own safety. A matter or political expediency and a passport to the more convivial conditions at Broadmoor Hospital, This type of transfer was a common occurrence,during my times.
              When it comes down to rock bottom, whether a convicted murderer is labelled as having a technicolored psychosis or whatever is, I feel somewhat academic. As you are probably aware treatment options are rather restricted. The days of chemical straitjackets and chemical coshes are no longer in vogue ! Group therapy has seen better days too.

              Now to Broadmoor Hospital. Firstly patients, not prisoners that were likely to spend their entire lives in captivity were assessed and moved through a semi and a full hospital 'parole ' system. Gloucester House catered for the semis who had access to the recreational area around the Block, where they could grow there own vegetable and associate with other patients sans staff supervision.

              Essex House,where Sutcliffe would have more than likely ended was even more relaxed. Each inmate had an ID card which enabled him to travel to other areas to visit friends or attend craft or industrial workshops. The only draw back was waiting in the pouring rain for staff to open gates and doors .

              At night ,the lower and upper wards had main access doors secured, but individual rooms were left unlocked A 'blind eye' was turned to 'relationships ' providing that there was mutual consent, quite progressive for the 1970's. THis was withheld from the general public.

              Staying in bed until 8am in Essex was absolutely no big deal, despite the crap spouted in DM. If he did work in the kitchens , he would have beenuip a'at sparrows's fart' and probably went back to bed!

              It's worth noting that every block in Block /Ward in the hospital had 'dayrooms' ,all of which had lounge chairs, TV's full size snooker tables and a selection of board games.

              All work conducted by patients at the hospital was paid on a weekly basis. Mr Sutcliffe would also be entitled to a weekly medical disability pension, as he was detained under the Mental Health Act of the day.

              It would be fair to say that Peter Sutcliffe would have been treated with humanity through the decades that the spent at the hospital. Although it was a super max institution , the use of first names was common between staff and patients. There was method behind this approach, firstly to establish a level of rapport with the individual and slowly try to assess the level of threat that they might still posed to others or themselves.The other objective of no lesser importance was gather intel on possible security breaches. A lot of time was spent writing up case notes! No computer in those days

              Unfortunately those who have never worked in this kind of establishments fail to grasp the fact that whatever you may think of the individual his offences , you are in the same environment as him for eight and sometimes sixteen hours a day.So your focus must remain on emotionally detached, but superficially engaged. Here, I refer to specifically to the likes of Sutcliffe. There were many people that ended up in Broadmoor that many staff felt should not been committed.


              That said , you never isolated yourself from other staff and to this day I subconsciously always sit with my back to the wall.!

              If there are any typos, my apologies. MY other cataract is due to removed and replaced with an IOL next week!
              Be nice to one another!
              Merv

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by jachim3926 View Post
                Thanks How and Chris for your views.
                To start with, i must confess that I didn't initially read the Daily Mail article. Having now done so, I agree with you Chris that there is evidence of inaccuracy and sensationalism in the article, but that's what sells newspapers.,alas..

                If you recall at at the time of his trial the Judge and ultimately the jury refused to accept a plea of preexisting, or insanity at the times that the crimes were committed .Sutcliffe's defence raised the issue of mental incompetence after he had apparently claimed that he 'heard voices' during the time he was employed as a graver digger.

                No doubt the psychiatrist that made a pretrial assessment for the Crown ,or perhaps the one engaged by his defence lawyers would have questioned him about such areas of possible psychoses. Whether he received advice to make this central to plea is a matter for conjecture.

                Thus Sutcliffe entered the mainstream prison system devoid of any formal psychiatric diagnosis That situation was to remain until such time that he was
                he was examined by a psychiatrist at HMP Parkhurst.

                While it is possible that incarcerated individuals may develop psychotic symptoms, there is usually some accompanying behavioural issues that draw the attention to the custodial staff. In Sutcliffe's case it seems that his wasn't exactly a compliant inmate, My opinion for was it it worth he received the diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia a business class upgrade from that of a sexual psychopath. What I find odd is that auditory hallucinosis is not usually associated with paranoid schizophrenia.

                Maybe the condition arose for the maintenance of peace and quiet at Parkhurst and likely for his own safety. A matter or political expediency and a passport to the more convivial conditions at Broadmoor Hospital, This type of transfer was a common occurrence,during my times.
                When it comes down to rock bottom, whether a convicted murderer is labelled as having a technicolored psychosis or whatever is, I feel somewhat academic. As you are probably aware treatment options are rather restricted. The days of chemical straitjackets and chemical coshes are no longer in vogue ! Group therapy has seen better days too.

                Now to Broadmoor Hospital. Firstly patients, not prisoners that were likely to spend their entire lives in captivity were assessed and moved through a semi and a full hospital 'parole ' system. Gloucester House catered for the semis who had access to the recreational area around the Block, where they could grow there own vegetable and associate with other patients sans staff supervision.

                Essex House,where Sutcliffe would have more than likely ended was even more relaxed. Each inmate had an ID card which enabled him to travel to other areas to visit friends or attend craft or industrial workshops. The only draw back was waiting in the pouring rain for staff to open gates and doors .

                At night ,the lower and upper wards had main access doors secured, but individual rooms were left unlocked A 'blind eye' was turned to 'relationships ' providing that there was mutual consent, quite progressive for the 1970's. THis was withheld from the general public.

                Staying in bed until 8am in Essex was absolutely no big deal, despite the crap spouted in DM. If he did work in the kitchens , he would have beenuip a'at sparrows's fart' and probably went back to bed!

                It's worth noting that every block in Block /Ward in the hospital had 'dayrooms' ,all of which had lounge chairs, TV's full size snooker tables and a selection of board games.

                All work conducted by patients at the hospital was paid on a weekly basis. Mr Sutcliffe would also be entitled to a weekly medical disability pension, as he was detained under the Mental Health Act of the day.

                It would be fair to say that Peter Sutcliffe would have been treated with humanity through the decades that the spent at the hospital. Although it was a super max institution , the use of first names was common between staff and patients. There was method behind this approach, firstly to establish a level of rapport with the individual and slowly try to assess the level of threat that they might still posed to others or themselves.The other objective of no lesser importance was gather intel on possible security breaches. A lot of time was spent writing up case notes! No computer in those days

                Unfortunately those who have never worked in this kind of establishments fail to grasp the fact that whatever you may think of the individual his offences , you are in the same environment as him for eight and sometimes sixteen hours a day.So your focus must remain on emotionally detached, but superficially engaged. Here, I refer to specifically to the likes of Sutcliffe. There were many people that ended up in Broadmoor that many staff felt should not been committed.


                That said , you never isolated yourself from other staff and to this day I subconsciously always sit with my back to the wall.!

                If there are any typos, my apologies. MY other cataract is due to removed and replaced with an IOL next week!

                Thanks - that's very interesting.

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                • #9
                  Thanks very much, Merv !
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                  • #10
                    Jimmy Savile was questioned by police investigating Yorkshire Ripper murders


                    https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2012/...-ripper-police
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