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Solomon De Leeuw

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  • #16
    This might explain why De Leeuw died in Deptford. Besides his shop in High Street, he was directly involved in the importing of cattle. If the murders coincided with the arrival of cattle boats, as some theorized, he might have been a busy man on the dockyards on those dates. This is from the 1880 directory, however.
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    • #17
      Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post
      This might explain why De Leeuw died in Deptford. Besides his shop in High Street, he was directly involved in the importing of cattle. If the murders coincided with the arrival of cattle boats, as some theorized, he might have been a busy man on the dockyards on those dates. This is from the 1880 directory, however.

      Thanks. That Deptford reference is new to me.


      But it was Dartford where his death was registered, and we know that was because he died at the City of London asylum at Stone nearby.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Chris Phillips View Post
        But it was Dartford where his death was registered, and we know that was because he died at the City of London asylum at Stone nearby.
        Ah, that's right. Dartford. My bad memory is at it again. I do think I found some other connection to Deptford, but I'll have to dig through my notes when I get a chance.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post
          Ah, that's right. Dartford. My bad memory is at it again. I do think I found some other connection to Deptford, but I'll have to dig through my notes when I get a chance.

          Easily confused. When I see a reference to D..tford I always have to double-check I'm thinking of the right one.

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          • #20
            Does anyone know? Was I looking at this right? De Leeuw's wife was Priscilla Joseph, the daughter of a well-off East End jeweler and dealer in precious stones, Moss Joseph? There is an account in the newspapers from the 1850s where one of Joseph's servants died tragically in a fire; they seem to have been a fairly affluent family.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post
              Does anyone know? Was I looking at this right? De Leeuw's wife was Priscilla Joseph, the daughter of a well-off East End jeweler and dealer in precious stones, Moss Joseph? There is an account in the newspapers from the 1850s where one of Joseph's servants died tragically in a fire; they seem to have been a fairly affluent family.

              Yes, that's right. Somewhere I think I have a copy of Moss Joseph's will. Priscilla's mother was called Frances Lealta. I presume she was related to Joseph Lialter, a business partner of Gabriel Horwitz who succeeded De Leeuw as the tenant of 59 Aldgate High Street. According to information posted by Karsten, Horwitz and Lialter were also at 6 Whitechapel High Street.

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              • #22
                Well, I’ll get a speeding ticket for the following suggestion, but the thought crossed my mind that maybe De Leeuw—a member of the nouveau riche?—met his future wife, the jeweler’s daughter, while visiting her father’s shop, because he was the sort of fellow that fancied thick chains, horse-shoe pins, and gaudy watch fobs! I speculate, of course, but the “Scotland Yard detective” quoted in the 1905 Sunday Chronicle piece seems to be saying that his suspect resembled the man seen by George Hutchinson… “His description agreed with that of a man seen in Dorset Street, Whitechapel, on the night when Mary Jane Kelly was cut to pieces…” He could mean the man seen by Sarah Lewis, but her description was so vague that it seems highly doubtful, so perhaps Hutchinson’s account was given considerably more weight than what many people seem to believe. I’d be very interested in knowing what De Leeuw looked like; he seems to fit the known details of the City suspect better than anyone else.

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                • #23
                  I found my note of Moss Joseph's will and probate. His effects were valued at 6,978 in 1892, which would equate to perhaps 0.75m today in terms of purchasing power. But he wasn't in the same league as Louis Tannenbaum, the husband of Priscilla's sister Anna. Louis left Priscilla an annuity of 50 a year. At probate in 1904 his estate was valued at 102,842 (gross), 102,555 (net); resworn at 99,074.

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                  • #24
                    In reading John Hainsworth's new book the other night, I was reminded of the following report from 9 January 1905 (it appeared in The Gloucester Citizen, among other papers).

                    "Inspector Robert Sagar, who is just retiring from the City Police, is entirely at variance with Mr. George R. Sims as to the identity of 'Jack the Ripper.' I see he has just stated, in an interview, that the City Police fully believed this man to be a butcher who worked in Aldgate, and was partly insane. It is believed that he made his way to Australia and there died...."

                    Obviously, the Australian bit would throw a wrench into the Solomon De Leeuw suggestion. On the other hand, various 'Australian' connections had made the rounds in the press, and it almost sounds like two different stories are being garbled together (?)

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