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The New York Physician Of High Standing

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  • The New York Physician Of High Standing

    I don't remember reading about this person's arrest or detainment....
    Anyone have an idea ?

    Boston Globe
    November 20, 1888
    *****************


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  • #2
    Could be Tumblety. He was tall, so that's high standing in a way.

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    • #3
      Bob...

      That could be right, all kidding aside, but the Boston people knew who Tumblety was because they had an article about him a day or so before on the 18th. of course, they misspelled his name.

      The next day in the Globe ( I'll put it up in a minute)...there's an article about Tumblety.
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      • #4
        Make that the same day, Bob.
        Its bizarre that Tumblety not only knew Booth but undoubtedly ran into Guiteau in that Hotel. Two Presidential assassins.

        Boston Globe
        November 26, 1888
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        • #5
          Hi all,

          Sir George Arthur

          Sir George Compton Archibald Arthur was born in 1860, and was the son of Colonel Sir Frederick Arthur and Lady Elizabeth Hay-Drummond. He succeeded to the title of 3rd Baronet Arthur of Upper Canada on 1 June 1878, and married Kate Hamet Brandon on 11 August 1898. He gained the rank of Lieutenant in the service of the 2nd Life Guards and later fought in both the Boer War 1900-01 and the First World War 1914-18. Between the years 1914-16 he held the office of Personal Private Secretary to the Secretary of State for War, he also wrote a number of military biographies on Kitchener Wolseley and Haig, and died at the age of 85 on 14 January 1946.

          At the time of the Whitechapel murders he was a 28 year old captain in the Royal Horse Guard and also an amateur actor, appearing as the corpse when Bancroft produced Theodora. He liked to engage in what was then a favourite and fashionable pastime of the wealthy Victorian, he liked to slum it in the poor areas. Arthur unfortunately chose Whitechapel at the time of the Ripper murders as a good place to slum, and thus became a suspect. Dressed in an old shooting coat and slouch hat he was spotted by two alert Constables approaching a well known prostitute. Fitting the popular description of Jack the Ripper he was arrested, much to the amusement of the newspapers. He was soon able to prove his innocence.

          New York World (U.S.A.)
          18 November 1888
          SPECIAL CABLE DESPATCH TO THE WORLD.
          London, Nov. 17. - The most intense amusement has been caused among all classes of the London world by the arrest last week of little Sir George Arthur on suspicion of being the Whitechapel murderer. Sir George is a young Baronet holding a captaincy in the regiment of Royal horse Guards, and is a member of the most leading clubs in town. He is also a well-known amateur actor, and was a great friend of the late Prince Leopold Duke of Albany. Since the past few weeks the old mania for "slumming" in Whitechapel has become fashionable again. Every night scores of young men, who have never been in the East End before in their lives, prowl around the neighborhood in which the murders were committed, talking with the frightened women and pushing their way into over-crowded lodging-houses. So long as any two men keep together and do not make a nuisance of themselves the police do not interfere with them. But if a man goes alone and tries to lure a woman of the street into a secluded corner to talk with her he is pretty sure to get into trouble. That was the case with Sir George Arthur. He put on an old shooting coat, a slouch hat and went down to Whitechapel for a little fun. He got it. It occurred to two policemen that Sir George answered very much the popular descriptive of Jack the Ripper. They watched him, and when they saw him talking with women they proceeded to collar him. He protested, expostulated and threatened them with the vengeance of royal wrath, but in vain. Finally, a chance was given to him to send to a fashionable Western Club to prove his identity, and he was released with profuse apologies for the mistake. The affair was kept out of the newspapers. But the jolly young Baronet's friends at Brook's Club considered the joke too good to be kept quiet.

          Interestingly, I haven't found any reports of this in British newspapers.
          Dave
          "From Hull, Hell and Halifax, Good Lord deliver us."

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          • #6
            Thanks DJ !
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            • #7
              Hi Howard.

              There is actually no evidence proving that Tumblety ever met Guiteau. There is, however, a large question mark over the Boston Globe article which you have posted here. It came, originally, from the New York World, 26 November, 1888, and is probably, based on a comparison, another example of Charles Dunham's reptile journalistic handiwork.

              For example, the man "Colonel James L. Sothern, of Chicago, the well known lawyer," doesn't appear to exist (well known or not) and the timeline given by James Pryor concerning Tumblety and Guiteau doesn't match the known facts. All in all I don't think the information provided by the article is worth the paper it was printed on. That's just me, though, I know that Tumblety supporters tend to ignore such trivial things.

              Wolf.

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              • #8
                Thanks very much, Wolf ! I'll remember that the next time I hear of this story.
                Much appreciated....
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