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Thomas Fogarty

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  • The Pwincess of Pwussia was of course part of that Germanic wave that washed over what is now the south west corner of Tower Hamlets.

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    • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
      What exactly happened to Gary in Brighton? That's what I have been waiting to find out. Was he waylaid down a back passage in the Lanes?
      He starts this uber provocative suspect thread and then doesn't deliver. Did he sign the official secrets act with East Sussex Council?
      Patience is a virtue.

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      • I thought it was a game of cards

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        • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
          I thought it was a game of cards
          If it were, Foggy would be a Royal Flush.

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          • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
            Don't you just love it when people get ultra-parochial in their responses to the Census question about place of birth?

            Margaret Sullivan with her 'Tower Hill' and the Tomkins's with their "Maiden Lane", for example, were very helpful.

            And now we have a blind hawker named Thomas Foggerty revealing in 1891 that he had been born in 'East Smithfield'. He could have said 'Wapping' (I think) or even just 'London', but no, he names the very street in which he was born. And that street was just a short walk away from the Roman Catholic chapel in Virginia Street where, in June, 1854, a child named Thomas Fogarty was Christened. His parents were recorded as William and Ellen (nee Driscoll).

            Then in 1861 we find a dock labourer named William Fogarty and his wife, Ellen, living with their 7-year-old son in Royal Mint Street, still within the same Irish enclave at the Eastern End of the Ratcliffe Highway where certain familiar Sullivan, Barnett and McCarthy families at one time or another lived.

            I'm hoping that one of our more technically gifted colleagues will post a map showing how close E. Smithfield, Virginia Street, Royal Mint Street, Blue Anchor Yard and NE Passage were.
            Hi Gary
            Is this guy a suspect?

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            • Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post
              Hi Gary
              Is this guy a suspect?
              Hi Abby,

              Well, he was the partner of Pearly Poll, who was either the genuine, but rather confused, pal of Martha Tabram or someone who made a rather clumsy attempt to divert suspicion for her killing from the actual perp on to an imaginary soldier. He spent most of his life in St George in the East and Whitechapel and had a history of violence. At least in his later years, he was mentally unstable.

              It's early days yet. We can't be sure when he hooked up with Poll, or whether his violence involved anything more than just hitting out with his stick at people whom he believed were harassing him. He may or may not have been the blind beggar with the 'ungovernable temper' who repeatedly stabbed his female guide in September, 1888.

              At the very least he is a fascinating new addition to the JTR cast list.


              Gary

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              • Beggar my neighbour.

                Or Blind mans Bluff

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                • Was he a suspect?
                  Was he a suspect?
                  He should have his own special section among the suspects!

                  Gary - I see you now favour the theory hat Pearly Poll was on a disinformation exercise by fingering the squaddies.

                  I've got a good title for the book...

                  'No-Eyed Jack'.

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                  • "Eyeless With Gazza."

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                    • Gazza?
                      Was Fog on the Tyne?

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                      • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
                        Gazza?
                        Was Fog on the Tyne?
                        No, and Huxley couldn't quite see through the Doors, unlike Lady Eleanor.

                        Surely, Ed, you're too young to relate to all this nonsense?

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                        • This is Ed's era :


                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1N1eTQNCk0

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                          • I've just noticed that I wrote 'eastern' end of the Ratcliffe Highway when I should have said 'western'. How embarrassing!

                            Seems strange to think of Blue Anchor Yard etc as being in the 'west end' of anywhere.

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                            • My relationship to nonsense is timeless Gary

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                              • Permission

                                I've just received permission from the E. Sussex Records Office to use the material I obtained from the Hellingly Hospital Pauper Patients Medical Case Book.

                                This record is held at The Keep under reference HE 26/3 (page 161). The material is Crown Copyright.


                                First a summary of the notes:


                                On the 9th January, 1906, Thomas Fogarty was transferred from the Claybury Asylum in Essex, where he'd been held for three years, to the East Sussex County Asylum at Hellingly.

                                A note in his records written by Marcus Bowlan, the MO at the STGITE infirmary who had certified Pearly Poll's death, cited the following behaviour as being indicative of insanity:

                                'He brushes and dust(s) imaginary powder off his head and cap. He says that people are constantly putting powder that smells like pepper on him and when it gets into his eyes it stupefys (sic) him. (These are delusions.) He says they do it to keep him here.'

                                Another note summarised his general mental condition:

                                'A very dull, apathetic man who is quite blind. Can only be got to answer questions with difficulty. Says he has been here five years. Does not seem to recollect coming here.'

                                Fogarty was said to have been noisy, excitable and suffering from delusions of persecution when he first arrived at Hellingly, but the most common observations during the subsequent months are of his being listless, depressed and unable to do anything for himself. At one point he claimed that he had been starved for three years. He was diagnosed as suffering from mania, dementia and chronic melancholia.

                                On one occasion, during one of his outbursts of 'excitability', he was described as having 'interfered' with other patients, but generally the impression is of someone who was so completely immured in his illness that he was oblivious to his surroundings.

                                On admission, his general physical condition and health had been classified as 'fair', although he was said to have been 'completely blind' and deaf. He had tattoos on both his arms and legs, and 'old scars on both legs' were discovered after his death.

                                However, although his lungs were classified as 'normal' on admission, a note written on 2nd June, 1906, stated that he was suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis and that moist 'rales' could be heard all over his chest.

                                By June 2nd, he was bringing up 'green offensive mucous' and by the 5th, his condition had deteriorated significantly. 'Both lungs were choked up with coarse rales, rapid failure of strength.'

                                He died at 3.40 pm on the The 5th July, 1906. The cause of death was recorded as pulmonary tuberculosis and dementia.

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