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Proving that Charles Lechmere is a very good suspect

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  • Originally posted by Christer Holmgren View Post

    No, Michael, we are emphatically done, and I am of the meaning that we owe it to the boards not to repeat our respective arguments in absurdum.

    If I should take interest in any other subject you may bring up, I will join the discussion, but any tango on the ”about” subject will have to be one-legged from now on.
    Apparently the Swedish word is överlämna:thumb:
    Regards

    Michael🔎


    " When you eliminate the impossible whatever remains no matter how improbable......is probably a little bit boring "

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    • Originally posted by Chris Phillips View Post

      Letters to newspapers aren't what the newspapers consider worthwhile writing about. They're what the readers think are worthwhile to send to the newspapers!
      I spent ten years working with letters to the editor, so am very aware how this works. Not everything that reaches the papers get into them.
      "In these matters it is the little things that tell the tales" - Coroner Wynne Baxter during the Nichols inquest.

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      • Originally posted by Christer Holmgren View Post

        I spent ten years working with letters to the editor, so am very aware how this works. Not everything that reaches the papers get into them.
        But were they really written by the newspaper when you worked there?

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        • Originally posted by Christer Holmgren View Post

          Can you see how this tells us two things?

          1. Clocks were sometimes off.
          2. When they were, it was sometimes so odd a thing that papers found it worthwhile to write about it.

          Normally, the clocks were more correct.
          So, when I see a letter to the editor complaining about, say, people texting on their cellphones while driving, I should realize that it was probably written and published because this is an 'odd thing' --not unlike a strange cloud formation or a rain of frogs---and not because it is so common and irritating that someone finally got fed-up and dashed off a letter?

          Here's the letter again. Maybe it's just me, but it doesn't have the tone of a "man bites dog" story. Indeed, the correspondent even refers to it as a "very frequent" occurrence.

          All the best.



          Tempus Fugit.jpg



          Comment


          • I can't quite fathom why 'Tempus Fugit' is complaining that this phenomenon is more frequent during "some parts of the year," but, whatever the case, the letter was published on 17 July 1885.

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            • Originally posted by Chris Phillips View Post

              But were they really written by the newspaper when you worked there?
              Of course not. They were letters from the readers, but there is always a sifting process before anything is published. At any rate, I think that in our case, the letter was not written because the three clocks were always dramatically out of order, but instead because the writer found it remarkable that they were when he observed them.
              "In these matters it is the little things that tell the tales" - Coroner Wynne Baxter during the Nichols inquest.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post
                I can't quite fathom why 'Tempus Fugit' is complaining that this phenomenon is more frequent during "some parts of the year," but, whatever the case, the letter was published on 17 July 1885.
                I think he's saying he only lives there for part of the year, not that the clocks are only wrong for part of the year.

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                • Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post

                  So, when I see a letter to the editor complaining about, say, people texting on their cellphones while driving, I should realize that it was probably written and published because this is an 'odd thing' --not unlike a strange cloud formation or a rain of frogs---and not because it is so common and irritating that someone finally got fed-up and dashed off a letter?

                  Here's the letter again. Maybe it's just me, but it doesn't have the tone of a "man bites dog" story. Indeed, the correspondent even refers to it as a "very frequent" occurrence.

                  All the best.



                  Tempus Fugit.jpg


                  It may well be that it was common that the three clocks were off, but the gist of the matter is that the writer found it remarkable that this was so.
                  We may also note how the writer kept track of the clocks. If he was asked about the time, he would likely compensate for the errors involved. We get used to the particular errors of clocks we are familiar with by way of being in contact with them frequently.
                  "In these matters it is the little things that tell the tales" - Coroner Wynne Baxter during the Nichols inquest.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Christer Holmgren View Post

                    No, Michael, we are emphatically done, and I am of the meaning that we owe it to the boards not to repeat our respective arguments in absurdum.

                    If I should take interest in any other subject you may bring up, I will join the discussion, but any tango on the ”about” subject will have to be one-legged from now on.
                    Christer you started a thread entitled "Proving that Charles Lechmere is a very good suspect" yet when I ask you a very simple question relating to one of the most basic and fundamental issues in your theory, you refuse to engage.

                    I certainly understand that the question I asked is too dangerous for you to answer directly.

                    If you admit that, consistent with his evidence, Lechmere might easily and realistically have left his house at 3.33 it puts your entire theory about Lechmere being a good suspect in jeopardy.

                    Yet you can't credibly deny that he might have left at 3.33 because that would be ridiculous.

                    If you don't want to discuss the word "about", despite that word being part of the evidence, I'll happily remove it from the question.

                    Here is my question re-worded.

                    Is it reasonably consistent with Lechmere's evidence on oath at the inquest that he could have left his house at 3.33?

                    This is a perfectly reasonable and fundamental question which is at the very heart of the "The Timing Aspect", a section spanning five pages in your book.

                    Are you now prepared to answer it?
                    Regards

                    Michael🔎


                    " When you eliminate the impossible whatever remains no matter how improbable......is probably a little bit boring "

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Michael Banks View Post

                      Christer you started a thread entitled "Proving that Charles Lechmere is a very good suspect" yet when I ask you a very simple question relating to one of the most basic and fundamental issues in your theory, you refuse to engage.

                      I certainly understand that the question I asked is too dangerous for you to answer directly.

                      If you admit that, consistent with his evidence, Lechmere might easily and realistically have left his house at 3.33 it puts your entire theory about Lechmere being a good suspect in jeopardy.

                      Yet you can't credibly deny that he might have left at 3.33 because that would be ridiculous.

                      If you don't want to discuss the word "about", despite that word being part of the evidence, I'll happily remove it from the question.

                      Here is my question re-worded.

                      Is it reasonably consistent with Lechmere's evidence on oath at the inquest that he could have left his house at 3.33?

                      This is a perfectly reasonable and fundamental question which is at the very heart of the "The Timing Aspect", a section spanning five pages in your book.

                      Are you now prepared to answer it?
                      Tango on, Michael. I mean what I say, its discussion over.
                      "In these matters it is the little things that tell the tales" - Coroner Wynne Baxter during the Nichols inquest.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Chris Phillips View Post

                        I think he's saying he only lives there for part of the year, not that the clocks are only wrong for part of the year.
                        Ah, of course--silly me.

                        Here's a commentator writing from South Shields in 1889. He is quite witty on the subject.




                        South Shields.jpg
                        South Shields B.jpg
                        South Shields C.jpg
                        South Shields D.jpg


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                        • Some more posts have had to be deleted.

                          As people, including the person who started this thread, are unable to maintain a basic level of civility, I am closing it here.

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