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The Hucknall Torkand Letter ( William Fishman & The Slaughter-House Man Theory)

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    By the way, I wasn't suggesting Mr. Fishman subscribed to the slaughter houseman theory....but that he mentions the story with the additional information about the Pinkertons checking out the two men in Chicago and Kansas City....which I had not known about.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Hucknall Torkand Letter ( William Fishman & The Slaughter-House Man Theory)

    The Evening News of November 26, 1888 contained this article :


    The Evening News

    November 26, 1888
    *****************
    THE EAST END MURDERS.
    AN EXTRORDINARY LETTER.
    An extraordinary letter, of considerable length, and signed, "Jack the Ripper's Pal," has been received by an
    old gentleman, Mr. Robert Porter, residing at Hucknall Torkard, Notts. The envelope bears the London East
    Central post*mark, and the writer states that he is a Notts man, has been in America some years, and since
    leaving Colorado has been carrying on "a deadly game" in the East*end. Most people thought that there was
    only one in the affair, but there are two, and the other taught him how to do it: but he was as bad as he was
    now, if not worse, for he never felt frightened in cutting a woman up now. When they went into a publichouse
    and heard some one reading about the Whitechapel affairs he had many a laugh. His "pal" was a wild
    wretch. There was not one soul in Nottingham who thought that a man who had lived in Huckall some years
    ago was doing all this. His "pal" was a Bavarian; they met on board a steamship, and he was mesmerized.
    When he found out his hideous calling they had become very intimate, and his "pal" cast a sort of spell over
    him. It was amusing to see the police arresting "Leather Aprons" every day. His "pal" was a great magician,
    and a very clever man. The letter has been handed over to the police authorities.


    In William Fishman's 'East End 1888' on page 215 of the hardback, we find this :

    'A further American connection arose out of the conviction that he ( The Whitechapel Murderer ) could be a slaughter-house worker, and police enquiries revealed that several of these had quit their jobs during the murders.

    Two suspects were found to have gone to the USA, one to Chicago, the other to Kansas City. Pinkerton agents commissioned by Scotland Yard actually caught up with them, questioned them thoroughly and judged them innocent.
    In December, a letter was sent from Colorado by an ex-employee to a Mr. Thomas Porter of Hucknall Torkand, who immediately handed it over to the county police.' ( in the East London Advertiser, December 1st).

    Any thoughts ?
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