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RDS's Grant Application To Literary Society

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  • #46
    Debs:

    The civil pension request might have something to do with his service back in Customs House...it makes you wonder if he came to believe his own porkie about being in HMS Coast Guard ( 1871 census designation ).

    John:

    Not only is he usually bereft and in search of funds...but he's always in bad health...going back to his court hearing upon his dismissal from the Customs House nearly 30 years before the material Debra located showed up.

    Chris..

    The comment about his wife "going wrong" certainly is interesting...
    I mentioned his brother Richard being alive in 1896...Nina reminded me...to point out that here again, he's not telling the truth. His sister was a principal at a school.
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    • #47
      John...

      This thread sort of reminds me of the good old days of the Gang of Four...lots of discussion and a lotta fun while being serious about this poor fella.
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      • #48
        Fascinating find Debs, some of the material posted I have seen, but the material posted earlier in the thread is quiet new.

        Lat year I visited London to view the archives of Grant Richards and found a large number of letters between Richards and RDS. The bulk of these letters was RDS asking for money and threatening Richards, to which Richards replied that he didn't have to take the book and publish it! The legal papers alone cover around 12 pages, and the correspondence about 30. There are also financial spreadsheets that show how many books were sold, how many were printed and how much RDS was entitled to in terms of commission.

        As for Annie Stephenson, she made numerous remarks in official documentation that she was the former wife of RDS. A number of articles discovered in Howden, Thorne, and Goole make mention of this. Annie Stephenson (Deary) also outlived Stephenson but as she was back in Yorkshire I doubt she would want to, or could even afford to, help RDS.

        As for Richard and Isaballa.



        Richard was alive and well in the 1911 Census, residing with his wife Minna at 77 Lorraine Mansions, Holloway, and working as an Organising Secretary. A far cry from his lofty Hull days as an East Sculcoates Politician. I am unsure when Richard died, but as he was alive in 1911 he was alive when RDS wrote the letter.

        Isabella Stephenson was residing in Kensington at 19 Fielding road during the 1911 Census, living on own means with her two daughters. Isabella outlived RDS and died in 1919.

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        • #49
          Interesting stuff about Richards, Mike.
          In his application for a grant in 1906, D'Onston is insistent that Richards scammed him and didn't keep his promises as far as adverting and promoting his book went.

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          • #50
            This is the footnote to the published article list that I mentioned earlier...and one for Chris to decipher I think.

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            • #51
              How, the civil pension was something to do with his writing the Patristic Gospels from what I can gather now.
              There are letters from different members of the clergy to Arthur Balfour, asking that D'Onston be considered for a government pension.

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              • #52
                The annotation Deb mentioned appears to read as follows...

                The above are selected from many hundreds (of ...) as being the most representative of my work

                The Col.s of Industry were the size of the MP(?) London (?) Times/News(?)

                My PMG articles were always headed


                Which indicates there are many further articles if we can identify his pen name - probably just RDO or possibly RS

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                • #53
                  Hi Debs, I think RDS was just miffed that the book wasn't as popular as he thought it was going to be. It appears as though they got off on the wrong foot as one of the earliest letters from Ricards to RDS was something along the lines of "How dare you speak to me like that..."

                  The returns and spreadsheets show that the book made very little money, on average about 30 a quarter were sold.

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                  • #54
                    "I want a pension because I wrote about Jesus." I might try that one.

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                    • #55
                      Anyone ever heard of "Moschkineering"?

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Nemo View Post
                        The annotation Deb mentioned appears to read as follows...

                        The above are selected from many hundreds (of ...) as being the most representative of my work

                        The Col.s of Industry were the size of the MP(?) London (?) Times/News(?)

                        My PMG articles were always headed


                        Which indicates there are many further articles if we can identify his pen name - probably just RDO or possibly RS
                        To add maybe just a little this is what I make of it:-
                        The above are selected from many hundreds of articles as being the most representative of my work. The columns of "Industry" were the size of the old "London News." My PMG articles were always headed.

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                        • #57
                          Here's a little about the "Answers" publication

                          http://www.dandare.info/history/fleet_history.htm

                          In 1888 a Victorian gentleman called Alfred Charles William Harmsworth launched a magazine called Answers to Correspondants, (Answers for short) which, while having nothing to do with comics, made him enough money to start a new title called Comic Cuts (17 May 1890).

                          Comic Cuts was the first halfpenny comic paper, and included cartoons and strips mainly taken from American humour papers: so popular was it, that by 1892 Harmsworth could boast a readership of two and half million a week!

                          With the money Harmsworth started a string of juvenile papers, including Illustrated Chips, The Wonder, Funny Wonder, Puck, Merry and Bright, and the short lived Firefly, and also introduced the idea of original comic art, as new printing methods, notably roto-gravure, saw the end of the old wood-block technique. Simply put, printing was easier.

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                          • #58
                            According to a dictionary of literature, William Le Queux was also a contributor to "Answers"

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                            • #59
                              Maybe it is just me, but all of the letters from the notable church folk all share the same handwriting. Is this because they were copied, or am I being too suspicious of RDS?

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                              • #60
                                It's a good job Stephenson isn't alive today, I could imagine his letters to the Times claiming he had been a school boy at Hogwarts, had a threesome with Bella and Edward, and had once dated, but dumped Bridgette Jones.

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