Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

RDS's Grant Application To Literary Society

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Bump up...still can't locate the second article D'Onston claimed to have written ( following the Under Five Flags article) for the PMG.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim Atkinson
    replied
    Originally posted by Nemo View Post
    Hi Tim

    Have you read Chris George's dissertation about Donston and some of the Ripper letters?

    http://www.casebook.org/dissertation...tonwrites.html
    I haven't Nemo. Thank you very much for the prompt. I'll have a read of that tonight.

    Thanks again.

    Tim.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Kearney A.K.A. NEMO
    replied
    Hi Tim

    Have you read Chris George's dissertation about Donston and some of the Ripper letters?

    http://www.casebook.org/dissertation...tonwrites.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim Atkinson
    replied
    Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
    Here is Deb's first post for them what squint, such as myself, and might have a hard time reading the letter from D'Onston :









    The underlining of some words and the right to left strokes are interesting. Quite similar to the dear boss handwriting excepting the use of a ruler as a straight line.

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Nice follow up on that, Nemo....

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Kearney A.K.A. NEMO
    replied
    I haven't found the "Industry" magazine but have found some information about the address which Donston gives as that of the magazine - 295 Strand

    From at least 1879 until 1883/4, the address was the Chief office of Dalton's Weekly House and Apartment Advertiser

    There is a Charles Evan Streachan, described as an advertising agent, who died Jan 1892 and whose address was 295 Strand

    http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issu.../2318/page.pdf

    This name appears on the back cover of the following programmes, asking for advertisements to be submitted, indicating that Streachan was such an agent from at least 1875 and whose initial address is given as 94 Fleet St

    http://www.cineressources.net/images/ouv_num/232.pdf

    http://www.cineressources.net/images/ouv_num/229.pdf

    Here's a claim for compensation for the compulsory purchase of 295 Strand giving some details about the business

    EVAN, STREACHAN AND COMPANY V. LONDON COUNTY

    COUNCIL.

    Mr. Troutbeck and a special jury.

    1900 April] [" Estates Gazette," LV., 608.

    Strand improvements.

    This was a claim for 3,262 compensation in respect of the
    compulsory acquisition of the freehold premises, Xo. 295, Strand,
    for the purposes of the Strand widening scheme.

    Mr. Edward Boyle, Q.C., appeared for the claimants; Mr.
    Dickens, Q.C., and Mr. Dumas for the London County Council.

    According to the opening statement of counsel, the claimants were
    advertising agents, whose business had been established since
    1855, and who had been in occupation of the premises in question
    for nearly 20 years. For the first 12 years the business was carried
    on solely on the first floor, but in 1892 the claimants succeeded in
    getting a lease for 21 years on very favourable terms, and securing
    possession of the ground floor, at a rental of 100 a year, the land-
    lord paying rates and taxes and all outgoings. Owing to the
    claimants having obtained possession of the ground floor, their
    business increased by leaps and bounds. In 1893 the net profits
    were 200, and in 1897-9 they averaged 726 a year ; as much
    as 25 had been taken in a single day.


    http://www.ebooksread.com/authors-en...ed-i-ala.shtml

    Here's a couple of examples of the type of advertisement submitted...

    ASSISTANCE (LITERARY) REQUIRED by
    GENTLEMAN desirous of preparing his notes on the Old
    Masters (Dutch and Italian) for the press. Only those thoroughly
    conversant with the subject need reply to C. L. Hastings, care of
    Streachan's, 295, Strand, W.C.

    LITERARY Unique opportunity for educated
    LADY to ENTER EXCLUSIVE LUCRATIVE PROFESSION.
    Literary inclination and business aptitude necessary. Fiction
    Streachan's, 295, Strand, W C.


    http://www.archive.org/stream/p2athe...7lond_djvu.txt
    1898

    A report of a Bernard Arhens, bankrupt cigarette importer 295 Strand

    http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issu...s/971/page.pdf

    ...and a small 16 page magazine called the Authors Circular being printed from that address circa 1898

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:P._S._Burton/New3

    There is no mention of the "Industry" magazine and I am unsure how the publication of it from 1879 onwards fits in with the other businesses at that address

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Kearney A.K.A. NEMO
    replied
    Thanks John

    I can see how Donston might have had an interest in the novel paint formulation

    I think if you imagine him scanning obscure articles looking for something to write about then his personal interests and knowledge would have played a part in the subject selection

    The list he has given may have been intentionally diverse to show how broad his knowledge base was

    However, it seems to me he just scanned other magazines and newspapers and picked up on topical subjects as some of the subjects are specialised and a little obscure

    I suppose he would have spent a lot of time in the library

    Leave a comment:


  • John Savage
    replied
    Hi Nemo,

    Silicate Paints.

    As Mike pointed out earlier there is a connection between seed crushing and the manufacture of paint, which is basically a mixture of oils, resins and pigments. There was a manufacturer of paints named Blundell's based in Hull from 1811.

    Donston is also said to have used his knowledge of cosmetics whilst involved in the Pompadour Cosmetics enterprise. Cosmetics would include both oils and pigments.

    Hope this helps.

    Rgds
    John

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Kearney A.K.A. NEMO
    replied
    If you read the criteria for an application, it says there that no grant will be given to anyone whose published works were offensive to morals or Religion

    A person who makes important contributions to "periodical literature" is considered eligible

    The only references to "Moschkin" I can find is when it is the name of the scientist

    It appears to be Russian or Polish and the scientist(s) seem to specialise in organic compounds and probably fractional distillation

    I have been trying to narrow it down to 1893/94 but there appears to be a number of scientists of the same name

    I'll keep looking

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Originally posted by Debra Arif View Post
    How, as well as the one you mentioned there were also two other Philadelphia Universities dishing out qualifications for dosh wasn't there?
    The American University of Philadelphia and the Philadelphia University of Medicine and Surgery. The first one run by the same guy in charge of the Eclectic and both investigated over bogus degree claims.


    Absolutely, Debs...good point.
    Maybe RDS had a sheepskin from one of those two bogus joints.

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    I can't see him being knowledgeable about all the subjects he has written about so I suspect each topic was already in the news when he wrote about it and he was just relaying information-
    Nemo

    Quite true, Neems...we can include Rider Haggard among those he boosted material from.
    In addition to that...that he was a mimic...his claims found in the Under Five Flags article of early 1887 are preposterous. He was nowhere near the United States in 1863....

    Quick note...Belle Boyd, the Southern patriot whom D'Onston claimed to have met, was held in the Old Capitol Prison in 1862..same slammer that Tumblety sat in for a spell...

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Kearney A.K.A. NEMO
    replied
    Hi Deb

    With Stead referring to it by the same title, either he is referring to Donston's application and has repeated how Donston referred to it, or that was the original title and it's just that he didn't remember changing the title before publication

    I do feel as Donston he has been selective with his articles though - there seems to be a lot from 1879

    I think he's just steering away from any occult connection though if he has hundreds of articles to choose from then perhaps it's not so untoward

    What I do pick up from his comments is that he is a little averse to writing fiction in that he has not the imagination

    This could be him indicating that his stories are true life experiences or more likely an indication that his stories were fiction but that he plagiarised the tales of others

    I can't see him being knowledgeable about all the subjects he has written about so I suspect each topic was already in the news when he wrote about it and he was just relaying information

    Leave a comment:


  • Debra Arif
    replied
    Originally posted by Nemo View Post
    Yes I noticed that Deb, though it appeared in Borderland as A Modern Magician: An autobiography by a pupil of Lord Lytton

    I'll have a look at the chemistry thing Deb. The Answers magazine was for youthful readers so I wouldn't expect it to be too obscure an operation
    Thanks Nemo.
    Perhaps he changed that article title too, just for the lists sake.
    Was he trying to make it harder to track down these articles or something? Why would he give the Borderland piece a different title? You'd think that he'd want to keep it exactly as it appeared in case anyone on the Literary Fund Committee might have read and enjoyed it and given his plea some sway!

    Leave a comment:


  • Debra Arif
    replied
    Originally posted by How Brown View Post
    Quite right, CG....

    In fact, there was no University of Philadelphia in the 19th Century.
    Textile College was what is now the Univ. of Phila., but the name change came about in 1999.
    I used to live a mile away from it.

    How, as well as the one you mentioned there were also two other Philadelphia Universities dishing out qualifications for dosh wasn't there?
    The American University of Philadelphia and the Philadelphia University of Medicine and Surgery. The first one run by the same guy in charge of the Eclectic and both investigated over bogus degree claims.

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Thanks Debs...I overlooked your post where you suggested University !

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X