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Salvation Army material researched?

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  • Pat Marshall
    replied
    The William Booth College is in Camberwell, at the top of Dog Kennel Hill. Near Peckham but not in it...

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  • Kattrup
    replied
    In the new Ripperologist #164, Stephen Senise has an article about George Hutchinson's signatures.



    I noticed it starts off with him mentioning him and his daughter "tracking down and viewing the Victoria Home file at the Salvation Army Heritage Centre (William Booth College) near Peckham, in November 2016."


    Apparently there is some mention of it in his book Jewbaiter Jack the Ripper.

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  • Robert Linford
    replied
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cUlP26Hv2B8

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
    Ah, Ben Gunn.


    For 1911 do Peter Cahill, aged 58.
    No cheese jokes please!

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  • Robert Linford
    replied
    Ah, Ben Gunn.


    For 1911 do Peter Cahill, aged 58.

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
    Did he have a brother named Tommy?
    My first job was in a stockbrokers in the City and my manager was Benny Gatling.

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
    You can get into the VH for 1901 by searching for Harry Gatling - that old son of a gun - aged c29.
    Did he have a brother named Tommy?

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  • Robert Linford
    replied
    You can get into the VH for 1901 by searching for Harry Gatling - that old son of a gun - aged c29.

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  • Robert Linford
    replied
    Henry Turner was there in 1888.

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Jerry Dunlop View Post
    The 1891 Census for the Victoria Home is available. That's the one that has James T. Sadler living there. I looked through all the records and could not find Hutch in there, though. I think there are some 400 names recorded. Charles William Mowl was the keeper. Maybe searching him can find some fruit?
    Thanks, Jerry. Did you see the photo Kattrup posted of the group of Danish Tourists outside the Home? Iím not sure he found an explicit reference to their staying at the Home, but the photo implies so. They looked very respectable - a million miles from the types you would have found in Dorset Street.

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  • Jerry Dunlop
    replied
    The 1891 Census for the Victoria Home is available. That's the one that has James T. Sadler living there. I looked through all the records and could not find Hutch in there, though. I think there are some 400 names recorded. Charles William Mowl was the keeper. Maybe searching him can find some fruit?

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  • Robert Linford
    replied
    I think she'd probably have said if they had the ledgers for Home 2, but who knows?

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
    Hi Gary


    When I phoned I did specify the Commercial St Home (Home 1). I think she said that the ledgers had been lost because they never reached them.
    Ah, so does that mean the lodgers ledgers for Home 2. may be extant? A lodger might switch between the two if they were similar.

    On occasion he might find his ‘usual place’ full up with bloomin’ Danish tourists and have to walk the short distance to the other establishment.

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  • Robert Linford
    replied
    Hi Gary


    When I phoned I did specify the Commercial St Home (Home 1). I think she said that the ledgers had been lost because they never reached them.

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
    I've phoned the IHS :


    https://www.salvationarmy.org.uk/int...eritage-centre


    They say that unfortunately they have no ledgers of lodgers. There are some papers relating to policy, minutes of meetings etc, possibly including info on nightly closing times. The archivist recommends emailing them. There's no charge for an initial enquiry.


    PLEASE NOTE : jellied eels not to be consumed on the premises.
    It seems the Sally Army only took over the VH @ 177, Whitechapel Road. There may be some records, though, that apply to the Commercial Street premises.

    These are the records of the Victoria Home, 1860-1984.

    Prior to its purchase by The Salvation Army, the site of 177 Whitechapel Road, London formed part of the site of the Whitechapel Workhouse and subsequently one half of the Victoria Homes for Working Men.

    In 1919 The Salvation Army bought the site of Victoria Home No. II and took it over as a going concern with 450 lodgers. The Victoria Home (as it was now called) was run as a hostel; it was differentiated from Salvation Army Men's Shelters by its higher prices and quality of 'comfort' available. Men paid five pence per night for a dorm or seven pence for a private cubicle. By 1922 the site had accommodation for 540, including 128 private cubicles.

    In 1984 Victoria Home ceased to operate and services were transferred to Booth House, at the adjoining site to Victoria Home. Most residents from Victoria Home moved to Riverside House, London. In 1994 177 Whitechapel Road was destroyed with the plan of building new flats for homeless men on the site.

    Victoria Home, along with Booth House hostel and Rawson Home eventide home, were at times collectively known as the Whitechapel complex.

    The records cover the years 1860-1919 and 1971-1984.

    The records are divided into two series:

    VH/1 Victoria Homes (pre-Salvation Army)
    VH/2 Victoria Home


    Prior to purchase by The Salvation Army the site of 177 Whitechapel Road, London formed part of the site of the Whitechapel Workhouse and subsequently one half of the Victoria Homes for Working Men.

    The Victoria Homes were founded by Lord Radstock in approximately 1887. Trustees of the Homes included Mr T A Denny, Mr J F W Deacon and Hon. Granville Waldegrave (3rd Baron Radstock). The Homes constituted two sites; No. I at 39-41 Commercial Street, London and No. II at 177 Whitechapel Road. The Homes styled themselves as an expression of 'practical Christianity'. Together they provided 'a better class of accommodation' than 'common lodging houses' for over 1000 'respectable' men.

    During the first world war the Homes faced increasing financial difficulties and the Trustees decided to close Home I. In 1919 The Salvation Army bought the site of Home II and took it over as a going concern with 450 lodgers. The Victoria Home (as it was now called) was run as a hostel; it was differentiated from Salvation Army Men's Shelters by its higher prices and quality of 'comfort' available. Men paid five pence per night for a dorm or seven pence for a private cubicle. By 1922 the site had accommodation for 540, including 128 private cubicles.

    By the 1970s accommodation had decreased to 310; by 1983 accommodation was for 200 men. In 1984 Victoria Home ceased to operate and services were transferred to Booth House, at the adjoining site to Victoria Home. Most residents from Victoria Home moved to Riverside House, London. In 1994 177 Whitechapel Road was destroyed with the plan of building new flats for homeless men on the site.

    Victoria Home, along with Booth House hostel and Rawson Home eventide home, were at times collectively known as the Whitechapel complex.

    Leave a comment:

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