Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Engraving on watch Jack the Ripper case solved?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Engraving on watch Jack the Ripper case solved?

    http://www.book-of-thoth.com/article971.html

  • #2
    Just one day, the writer of one of these sort of articles might just get it right and seperate fact from fiction. I'm not holding my breath though.

    Comment


    • #3
      Nipping over here to the watch threads to discuss the scratches as per your invitation. I can't argue that they're of recent vintage, even if I wanted to. Just for jolly, I may argue that the scratches on metal might be as notoriously hard to date as stone engravings.
      Remember the James Ossuary. I spent 16 dollars to view it at the museum. With all the talk of the patina match, the scientists convinced me that it was probably real. Now we know it was chemically faked.
      I learned alot though I have to admit. Maybe I can understand the science of watch engravings if I compare it to ossuary inscriptions.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi Marco.

        Thanks for joining in.

        The surface analysis of the watch didn't indicate the presence of any substances that shouldn't have been there, as you might expect if any chemical "aging" had taken place.

        What is much more important though is the evidence we have of the order in which the scratches were made. That the Maybrick scratches were beneath all the random scratches caused by normal wear and tear, as if they were put there when the watch was relatively new. This would be impossible to fake, as you can't slip a set of scratches in beneath a previous one. It can't be done.

        The evidence that the watch scratches are genuinely of Maybrick's time are very compelling.

        I've yet to read a sane or half believable argument against it, but I'm willing to listen!

        regards.

        Paul

        Comment


        • #5
          If the watch was in pristine condition, surely a Lancashire artist exists who can fake old wear and tear over new engravings. They have a reputation. Wasn't the alien autopsy which impressed pathologists, done by a Dr. Who FX artist from Lancashire?
          That being said, I do remember the theory of the double watch switch done by Albert Johnson and it makes sense.
          Sister Mary would not approve. But it keeps the discussion going....

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Marco Franzoi View Post
            If the watch was in pristine condition, surely a Lancashire artist exists who can fake old wear and tear over new engravings. They have a reputation. Wasn't the alien autopsy which impressed pathologists, done by a Dr. Who FX artist from Lancashire?
            That being said, I do remember the theory of the double watch switch done by Albert Johnson and it makes sense.
            Sister Mary would not approve. But it keeps the discussion going....
            Yes, Robert Santilli owner of the autopsy footage claims that he saw a real alien autopsy but the footage was unusable, instead he employed a team to recreate the autopsy and release it as real! How on earth this guy has not been done for fraud is beyond me!
            Back at the time I bought three different versions of the alleged footage and it cost me about 75!, I wrote to Santilli's film company and the would not reply!

            Comment

            Working...
            X