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The Most Dangerous Man in his Majesty's Prisons!

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  • #31
    I can't see the relevance even if they were related. One wrote a letter in 1889 suggesting Thick was the Ripper and the other ( a solicitor) took an affidavit in 1907 concerning Grande's prison experiences.

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    • #32
      Oi, Grande. I 'ear that you're the most dangerous man in all of 'is majesty's, gor bless him, prisons. What exactly was you banged up for in the first place?

      Errrr, blackmailing a little old lady.
      Itsnotrocketsurgery

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      • #33
        'No I never done it, I'm innocent I tell yer, it was that bleedin' judge'

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        • #34
          'And I swore to that on an havadavid so it must be true'

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          • #35
            I can't see the relevance even if they were related. One wrote a letter in 1889 suggesting Thick was the Ripper and the other ( a solicitor) took an affidavit in 1907 concerning Grande's prison experiences.
            -Debs-

            Debs....the fact that Haslewood isn't a common name like Brown, Smith, Jones, or Torquoy:cool:....had me thinking that maybe it was the same fellow...with the additional fact that his first name began with an H...and his name was in initials, not like Edward, Stephen, or Joe.
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            • #36
              Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
              I can't see the relevance even if they were related. One wrote a letter in 1889 suggesting Thick was the Ripper and the other ( a solicitor) took an affidavit in 1907 concerning Grande's prison experiences.
              -Debs-

              Debs....the fact that Haslewood isn't a common name like Brown, Smith, Jones, or Torquoy:cool:....had me thinking that maybe it was the same fellow...with the additional fact that his first name began with an H...and his name was in intials, not like Edward, Stephen, or Joe.

              Yes, I realise that How. It was perfectly reasonable and natural to wonder if it was the same man. We now know it wasn't though. The post you quoted of mine was in response to Dusty asking if they were related at all-which I don't think matters , even if they were it's just a coincidence. -no offence to Dusty.

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              • #37
                Herbert Dering Haslewood was born in Kent in 1870, from a family of Home County Vicars. He was the son of Francis Haslewood.
                If he had been related I can imagine all sorts of intrigue being suggested.
                But by the same token apparently nothing can be deduced from Pizer staying at Crossingham's in Holloway Road.

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                • #38
                  I'd be very interested in finding a name for the editor of 'Answers'

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
                    Herbert Dering Haslewood was born in Kent in 1870, from a family of Home County Vicars. He was the son of Francis Haslewood.
                    If he had been related I can imagine all sorts of intrigue being suggested.
                    But by the same token apparently nothing can be deduced from Pizer staying at Crossingham's in Holloway Road.
                    H D Haslwood was the solicitor who took Grande's sworn affidavit about the truth of his statements about his treatment in prison. Grande would have been taken to a solicitor by the editor of 'Answers'to cover them legally if they published these claims made by Grande-which apparently include cruelty to prisoners by guards etc.
                    D T Haslewood was a solicitors clerk who suggested Thick was the Ripper in 1889.How could these two evens have any bearing on each other, even if the two men were related?

                    I agreed with Lynn about the significance of Pizer staying at Crossingham's and Timothy Donovan claiming to know Pizer. It was intriguing a first but it could only be significant if ones theory revolves around the 'Lords' of Spitalfields and a link to Pizer-which that provided. Otherwise it is just a coincidence of two separate events-as it was for Lynn. Tom could never brush that off as coincidence the same as Lynn could though could he? A definite link between one of the Lords and Pizer on the night of one of the murders.

                    I always try and asses what a source means in relation to each individual theory -not as whole. I must be weird in this as no one seems to get what I'm saying. Oh well

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                    • #40
                      I always try and assess what a source means in relation to each individual theory -not as whole. I must be weird in this as no one seems to get what I'm saying. Oh well
                      -Debs-

                      Not at all, Debs...I understood perfectly what you mean.
                      Nothing weird whatsoever.
                      I've been trying to find out anything I can about 'Answers' journal, but its been a shut out so far....finding the editor's name would be a very good start...good thinking, Debs.
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                      • #41
                        I have found an earlier first appearance for Grande’s affidavit. I appeared in the Burnley Express for March 2, 1907


                        Answers magazine ran from Dec 28, 1889 to Feb 18, 1956. A forerunner, Answers to Correspondents ran from Jun 2, 1888 to Dec 21, 1889. It was founded by Alfred Harmsworth, largely financed by his brother Henry, and printed, at first, by Iliffe & Son. It was edited by Cecil Harmsworth for some of this time. It was inspired by the success of Tit-Bits and quickly reached over a million copies a week. It was published every Tuesday for one penny.

                        Paul Begg discusses the publication in his Definitive History (pp 263-264). He quotes Alfred Harmsworth as claiming that heavy London fogs and Jack the Ripper nearly killed off Answers to Correspondents in its early days... There is also a quite lengthy entry in The Dictionary of Nineteenth Century Journalism in Great Britain and Ireland (ed. Laurel Brake et al).

                        It published articles like ‘How Madmen Write’ and ‘Why Jews Don’t Ride Bicycles’. Grande’s prison piece seems a natural home for it. It also serialised mystery/thriller stories and published work by AM Burrage and E. Phillps Oppenheim among many others.


                        I feel it ought to be possible to locate a copy of Grande’s prison article. I’ve checked the special collections of a few University Libraries which I know contain strong media and journalism resources, but no luck yet. If I get time next week I’ll continue my search, unless Debs gets there first.

                        David

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                        • #42
                          Thanks How.

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                          • #43
                            Thanks David! Great information.

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                            • #44
                              Great work, David !
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                              • #45
                                This is the entry in the British Library catalogue that I noted last year when I was looking for the issue:

                                Title: Answers.
                                Publication Details: London : B.W. Young, 1888-1955.
                                Language: English
                                Description: No.1-3311 (2 Jun. 1888-1955)
                                Identifier: System number 016678182
                                Physical Description: folio.
                                Holdings Notes: General Reference Collection Crawford 2608.(8.) No.356. 23 Mar. 1895
                                Shelfmark(s): General Reference Collection Crawford 2608.(8.)

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