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The Awful Work Of Leather Apron Creates A Panic

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  • The Awful Work Of Leather Apron Creates A Panic

    Philadelphia Times
    October 1, 1888
    *************




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  • #2
    Smith, Tabram, Nichols, Chapman, Stride, Eddowes...who's the seventh victim?

    Yours truly,

    Tom Wescott

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    • #3
      Tom:
      I imagine that they added the 'Christmas 1887 victim'.
      Many papers did.
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      • #4
        But I don't think that was invented until November, right?

        Yours truly,

        Tom Wescott

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        • #5
          Tom:
          I ought to know the answer without thinking twice...and while I'm not positive, I lean toward that imaginary victim appearing earlier than the Millers Court Murder in the papers.
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          • #6
            torso

            Hello Tom, Howard. One of the torsos is often included here.

            Cheers.
            LC

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            • #7
              On Oct. 1st 1888? If they're including the very recent NSY embankment discovery, its strange that the cable didn't mention it with the other two murders.
              Best Wishes,
              Cris Malone
              ______________________________________________
              "Objectivity comes from how the evidence is treated, not the nature of the evidence itself. Historians can be just as objective as any scientist."

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              • #8
                From the Daily Telegraph, 10 Sept. 1888:

                The first murder at Christmas passed without much notice, and no evidence of identification was adduced at the inquest. A wholly satisfactory explanation of the cause of death was not forthcoming, but in some respects the nature of the injuries sustained had a resemblance to those which were inflicted upon the three other women who have since succumbed to violence of a most revolting character.

                What was to become the named "Fairy Fay" in 1950 was already being misreported in the press before the murders of Sept. 30, 1888 - a progressive confusion regarding the attack on Margaret Hames mentioned also by the press (Llyod's I believe) during the Emma Smith inquest.
                Best Wishes,
                Cris Malone
                ______________________________________________
                "Objectivity comes from how the evidence is treated, not the nature of the evidence itself. Historians can be just as objective as any scientist."

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                • #9
                  early

                  Hello Cris. Thanks. That is a tad early. May be Fairy Fay for all that.

                  Cheers.
                  LC

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                  • #10
                    According to this report in the New York Evening World, the pre-Emma Smith victim was murdered before October 12th,1887.....

                    New York Evening World
                    October 12, 1888
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                    • #11
                      Hi Howard. No, that's supposed to be Smith as Tabram is #2.

                      Yours truly,

                      Tom Wescott

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                      • #12
                        Tom:

                        That's right, it is Smith, but the date is erroneously noted as being prior to October 12, 1887.
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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
                          According to this report in the New York Evening World, the pre-Emma Smith victim was murdered before October 12th,1887.....
                          Hi How

                          I think the Writer/editor of this slightly later article reasoned the same way as you did;- (first posted by Chris Scott, IIRC)

                          'New York Tribune
                          11 Nov. 1888
                          The history of the reign of horror which now paralyzes all London with a panic of fear reaches back for a year. The mutilator's first success was achieved early in the month of October 1887'

                          'Early in the month of October' = pre 12th October

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                          • #14
                            Lucky:
                            Thanks for that, as I didn't recall Chris's find.
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mr. Lucky View Post
                              Hi How

                              I think the Writer/editor of this slightly later article reasoned the same way as you did;- (first posted by Chris Scott, IIRC)

                              'New York Tribune
                              11 Nov. 1888
                              The history of the reign of horror which now paralyzes all London with a panic of fear reaches back for a year. The mutilator's first success was achieved early in the month of October 1887'

                              'Early in the month of October' = pre 12th October
                              Looks like a case of one New York source copying another and repeating the same error.

                              Yours truly,

                              Tom Wescott

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