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  • Edward Stow
    replied
    Let's discount protecting the non U fairly respectable family - doesn't wash if he really thought Druitt was the culprit.

    The reputation of the police would have been greatly enhanced by a posthumous solving of the case - if there were firm foundations for thinking it had been solved - which of course there weren't. Did anyone else agree with Macnaghten's solution in the Met?

    What have we actually got here?
    A vain, conceited and frustrated man telling half baked pet garbled theories and tales to his buddies to disseminate in a deniable manner to prevent him from being called to account or ridiculed.
    Why start spreading these tales? They are an old man's conceit - not wanting it thought he didnt know the answer to the biggest mystery of the century.

    If he wanted to protect Scotland Yard's rep for not catching Druitt or wanted to shield the family then he should have remained tight lipped - but no - that didn't satisfy his ego.

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  • Jonathan Hainsworth
    replied
    No, Edward it was not.

    The reason for Macnaghten's subterfuge was both to protect the surviving, respectable family, but mainly to protect Scotland Yard's rep from humiliation that they had missed the real Jack by years.

    In 1898 William Le Queux understoodf that this is what it was about and said so, eg. it was excuse. It might be a real suspect later on but not from 1888. Correct (as Mac conceded in 1914)

    This discreet subterfuge could only work if those who knew Montague Druitt, or knew of Druitt, could not recognize him from the writings of Sims, and later Macnaghten's austere comments of 1913 and opaque memoirs of 1914.

    Mission accomplished. Druitt was not recognized, not according to the extant record.

    That Druitt was hidden is a fact.

    An extremely unwelcome and deeply resented fact for some here, but a fact nonetheless.

    The question is: was it deliberate or just by a fortuitous accident that the Druitts, the ones who knew, could read about the 'Drowned Doctor' solution and be relieved that their Montie remained hidden (and became more hidden as the fictional details accumulated during the 1900's)?

    How is the reading of my long post about Inspector Andrews going?

    Leave a comment:


  • Edward Stow
    replied
    So the reason for this elaborate subterfuge involving several different people who were in the know, was to protect the sensitivities of the ex pupils at Valentine's?

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  • Jonathan Hainsworth
    replied
    Blackheath--just a coincidence?

    This is the whole excerpt, thanks to Stewart Evans:

    'Pearson's Weekly' , July 24th 1915

    From an article by George Sims

    'I was able to make such a faithful record of his murderous adventures that my friend, Sir Melville Macnaghten, late Chief of the Criminal Investigation Department of Scotland Yard, paid me the compliment of reprinting my narrative verbatim in his most interesting reminiscences, The Days of My Years. [sic]

    With Neil [sic] Cream murder was pastime. There was no question of the insanity of revenge upon a certain class of women as there was in the case of the mad doctor who lived with his people at Blackheath and who, during his occasional absences from home, committed the crimes which won him world-wide infamy as 'Jack the Ripper'.

    The fact that habitual criminals invariably sign their names, as it were, to their crimes they always carry them out with an exact similarity of detail, enabled criminologists to fix the exact number of murders committed by the Ripper. They were five in number only. The other crimes accredited to this fiend were the work of other hands. They were quite dissimilar in many ways and the handwriting of the Ripper was not upon them.'


    In my opinion, we see Mac's Big Fix still playing out in the public sphere with its customary smoothness.

    Any mature graduate of the Valentine school who read this article could think, well, what a coincidence--Jack the Ripper lived in Blackheath where I went to school. He was a bit of a recluse, being judged 'mad', but was noticeably absent on the nights of the murders by the people he lived with, presumably his family.

    You know, I had a sporty, young teacher at that school in 1888 and he went AWOL and it turned out he had killed himself--and he was judged insane too.

    Of course that's where the coincidence ends, as Mr. Druitt lived with us at the school and was a barrister who 'absented' himself only once, poor man.

    We see that Sims has not accepted what Jack Littlechild was alerting the him to in Sept. 1913: that he had the wrong suicided doctor chief suspect. But then Mac could have so easily persuaded Sims that it was Littlelchild's memory that was at fault: Dr. Tumblety was alive and well until 1903 (and guess who probably told him that Tumblety was 'believed' to have taken his own life).

    Mac using an excerpt from Sims' about a murder case did the trick of flattering his chum's vanity.

    Also, that the retired chief's extending the gap between the final murder on morning of Nov. 9th and 'Jack's self-murder sometime on Nov. 10th -- exactly the 'single day' that Sims claimed in 1907 the Ripper could have not endured after what he did to Kelly-- could also be so easily be explained.

    The 10th! Did I write the 10th? Damn! I meant to write that he had killed himself on the 9th, the same morning of course Tatcho! Oh well we all make mistakes and in fact I apologized for any inaccuracies in my preface (lucky that, hey?)

    There is also the myth created by Mac that the five murders were known by the police at the time to be the only ones by the same killer. In fact they assumed McKenzie and Coles were also by the same hand, and maybe Smith and Tabram too. It was posthumous info., about the long dead Druitt that, rightly or wrongly, locked in the five.

    And finally 'Blackheath' the only time known in the extant record that Sims so baldly wrote the actual suburb in which the fiend resided (he had alluded to a 'suburb six miles' from Whitechapel in his 1907 article).

    If you were a Valentine graduate and you were familiar with several of Sims/Dagonet's writings on the Ripper you would have been struck by yet another coincidence: the fiend lived in the same suburb and, of course, drowned himself in the Thames.

    But the differences would have outweighed the similarities to Mr. Druitt and his inexplicable and untimely death in 1888.

    Apart from having a different vocation, and age, Mr Druitt lived at the school as a lodger and he killed himself in early Dec. not early Nov. 1888.

    It baffles me that so many people actually believe that this obvious shielding of, for example, the grown-up graduates of the Blackheath school must be ... just a happy and convenient side-effect for all concerned due to a police chief's terrible memory, a memory otherwise lauded for its voluminous accuracy (and a police chief who regarded his own school days as the happiest of his entire life).

    Just a coincidence ...?

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Thanks very much ,Stewart !

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  • SPE
    replied
    Yes...

    Originally posted by Roy Corduroy View Post
    Thank you Stewart, the 'doctor' lore stuck like glue.
    John Ruffels posted (click) in 2005 on a Casebook thread:
    "George R Sims published the interesting fact that the mysterious Jack the Ripper not only suicided, but resided at Blackheath!
    PEARSONS WEEKLY of July 24, 1915.
    The quote is:
    "There was no question of the insanity of revenge upon a certain class of woman as there was in the case of the mad doctor who lived with his people at Blackheath...." "
    Yes, I believe that John got this information when I posted the full piece from Pearson's, I have the original issue.

    Leave a comment:


  • Roy Corduroy
    replied
    Thank you Stewart, the 'doctor' lore stuck like glue.

    John Ruffels posted (click) in 2005 on a Casebook thread:

    "George R Sims published the interesting fact that the mysterious Jack the Ripper not only suicided, but resided at Blackheath!

    PEARSONS WEEKLY of July 24, 1915.
    The quote is:
    "There was no question of the insanity of revenge upon a certain class of woman as there was in the case of the mad doctor who lived with his people at Blackheath...." "

    Leave a comment:


  • Jonathan Hainsworth
    replied
    Dr Bluitt is not Mr Druitt--right?

    Thanks for posting all that Stewart.

    Fascinating material, at least for me.

    I stand by what wrote years before:

    That if a minor comic writer such as Frank Richardson knew Druitt's name then most certainly so did George Sims.

    Imagine being a graduate of the Valentine School and reading, in 1908, that reference to Dr Bluitt who flung himself in the Thames--and who was, joshingly, Jack the Ripper.

    It might trigger a query in your memory about poor Mr. Druitt who, tragically and inexplicably, 'also' flung himself in the Thames ... but he was a barrister and a teacher, not a doctor.

    Sims, we know now--thanks to the same dogged researcher, Chris Phillips-- wrote about the drowned doctor as 'Dr. ___' in a 1910 column, the one kicking hell out of Anderson over his gaffe-prone memoirs: 'Anderson's Fairy Tales'.

    This 1910 column is also the first time in the extant record that a 'final' version of the 'Home Office Report' is mooted (allegedly residing at the Home Office) and that this document of state does not decide between the English doctor, the Russian doctor and the Polish Jew Ripper suspects.

    Absolutely correct, and inside information that could only come from Macnaghten.

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  • SPE
    replied
    Last mention

    Last mention.

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  • SPE
    replied
    Last but one...

    Last but one.

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  • SPE
    replied
    And another...

    And another.

    Click image for larger version

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  • SPE
    replied
    Another

    Another Jack the Ripper reference.

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  • SPE
    replied
    Jack the Ripper

    Jack the Ripper reference.

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  • SPE
    replied
    Doctor Bluitt

    The Doctor Bluitt reference.

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  • SPE
    replied
    George R. Sims

    Mention of George R. Sims (indicating that Richardson read Sims' writings).

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