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  • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post

    Why Mike? Thursday was the half day, and it seems Thursday and Saturday were the days when cricket matches were played at Blandford. Why wouldn’t the start of the Thursday matches have been set to coincide with the closing of the town’s businesses? The recreation ground was a community facility.
    This seems like common sense to me.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Chris Phillips View Post

      Thanks. What I was wondering really is whether an afternoon start on an early-closing day in Blandford would allow working men to play for the Blandford side to a greater extent than for the Isle of Purbeck side - because (1) maybe it wasn't early-closing day in the Isle of Purbeck and (2) even if it were, because the Purbeck team had to travel, working men might not have had time to get to Blandford after finishing work at lunchtime. So maybe if it was an afternoon start, we should expect to find a higher proportion of working men in the Blandford team than in the Purbeck team?
      I would have thought that any working men in these teams were there purely on merit and might easily have got a pass from their employers to play alongside the toffs. I notice there were a couple of Bankes’s in the Purbeck team - there was a very prominent local family of that name.

      The number of available spectators would have increased considerably once early closing commenced.


      Comment


      • I don't recall whether it has been established that Druitt had previously played for Purbeck - but it might be that he turned out for them because it was a mid week match and the half day on Thursday was a Blandford thing that didn't apply to, say, Wareham or Swanage - and they needed the extra man.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Michael Banks View Post
          https://www.cambscrickethistory.co.uk/

          This is the website of the guy I emailed. A man who has clearly done a lot of research into Victorian cricket and who clearly has contact with likeminded men who know their subject. That the game could have started at 1.00 or 12.00 should be beyond question. In fact it should be considered likely. Upsetting though that may be.
          Has anyone said it couldn’t have started that early, Mike? Of course it could. But the fact that Thursday was half day closing in Blandford and the fact that we can find numerous examples of matches starting much later means we can’t consider it ‘likely’ at all.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
            I don't recall whether it has been established that Druitt had previously played for Purbeck - but it might be that he turned out for them because it was a mid week match and the half day on Thursday was a Blandford thing that didn't apply to, say, Wareham or Swanage - and they needed the extra man.
            I'm working from memory, but an 'M. Druitt' played for Wimborne against Blandford in 1885. On the opposing team was a 'W. Farquharson' who I took to be Walter Farquharson, the MP's cousin who lived in Blandford. If I'm right, Walter died in India the following year.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post

              Why Mike? Thursday was the half day, and it seems Thursday and Saturday were the days when cricket matches were played at Blandford. Why wouldn’t the start of the Thursday matches have been set to coincide with the closing of the town’s businesses? The recreation ground was a community facility.
              Where has it been proven that games of cricket were only played on those days Gary? If this was a game simply to celebrate the occasion of the re-opening of the cricket (a kind of one-off festival type game) why is it described as ‘return match’ in the description.

              Regards

              Michael🔎


              " When you eliminate the impossible whatever remains no matter how improbable......is probably a little bit boring "

              Comment


              • And to think, Druitt would have to have been aware of all the train times, the early closing, the possibility of the cricket match going on too long and scuppering his plans, thinking up a reason to explain his sudden dash to London, the logistics of dumping his cricket attire in a place and manner that wouldn't attract attention and change into clothing which accommodated a knife he had previously secreted, knowing the East End and where and when to murder his next unfortunate, discovering which unfortunates couldn't afford their bed for the night and would be tramping the streets whenever he happened to arrive, and then, once the deed was done, having to cleanse himself of blood before going through the same travel rigmarole in reverse, arriving in Wimborne, once again secreting the knife and changing into his whites in time for another rousing game of cricket.

                If you believe this, or any variations of it, you need help.

                Stay happy.

                Simon

                Comment


                • Yes, here it is. I had saved it to my files. The 'Rev Pierce' was in both this game and the 1888 game under discussion, as was "E.O. Richards" who was evidently Edward Owen Richards, who was a local wine and spirits merchant.

                  The Thurston brothers who played for Blandford in the1888 game included the local bank manager, Hugh Thurston. I don't think these were working-class men. [Edit]



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                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post

                    Has anyone said it couldn’t have started that early, Mike? Of course it could. But the fact that Thursday was half day closing in Blandford and the fact that we can find numerous examples of matches starting much later means we can’t consider it ‘likely’ at all.
                    Fair enough Gary. The guy on the website speaks to his acquaintances who specialise in the subject of cricket in the Victorian era and they say that 12.00 is the likelier time with 11.00 being very possible. Of course I wouldn’t doubt that some games began after midday but that would have been the minority. Cricket itself is geared towards an earlier start because the light has such an effect on it which could give an unfair advantage to one side on the toss of a coin.

                    Im not refusing to accept a possibility Gary but beginning a cricket game later in the days isn’t the norm. We need proof that this game began late. But even if it did begin at 1.30 it still could have been over easily for 4.00 or 4.30. Yes it’s tight but he could still have made it.
                    Regards

                    Michael🔎


                    " When you eliminate the impossible whatever remains no matter how improbable......is probably a little bit boring "

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
                      I don't recall whether it has been established that Druitt had previously played for Purbeck - but it might be that he turned out for them because it was a mid week match and the half day on Thursday was a Blandford thing that didn't apply to, say, Wareham or Swanage - and they needed the extra man.
                      A good point.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post

                        Yes, out of curiosity, I did look to see if it would have been difficult for the Isle of Purbeck team to get to Blandford for a mid-morning match, if indeed it started mid-morning. The trains out of Corfe Castle and Wareham (where most of the players lived) left before or just after 8 a.m. and arrived in Wimborne at 8.30., where (theoretically) Druitt could have joined their party. I had trouble finding the morning trains from Wimborne to Blandford, so it is still a work-in-progress.

                        I didn't study the Blandford team in great detail, but one of the players was a wealthy solicitor and JP whose ancestral home is now listed. Another player was a vicar, and 'W. Farquharson' played on the Blandford team against an 'M. Druitt' in 1885. I think this must have been Walter Farquharson, the MP's cousin. If this is the correct, he died in India the next year.


                        Click image for larger version Name:	Corfe Castle to Wimborne Jan 89.jpg Views:	0 Size:	50.9 KB ID:	588595
                        Of course, trains weren’t the only form of transport in the 1880s. Char-a-Banc were often used by groups of people going on a day out.

                        I don’t know how far their range might have been.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post
                          Yes, here it is. I had saved it to my files. The 'Rev Pierce' was in both this game and the 1888 game under discussion, as was "E.O. Richards" who was evidently Edward Owen Richards, who was a local wine and spirits merchant.

                          The Thurston brothers who played for Blandford in the1888 game were the sons of the local bank manager, Hugh Thurston. I don't think these were working-class men.



                          Click image for larger version

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                          The chances are that most of these men had social connections outside of the cricket club. And if one of their number was a working man, his employer was probably also in the same circle as the toffs on the team. I don’t see the half-day aspect having any impact on the make-up of team.

                          I

                          Comment


                          • Chris -- Here are some more information, but you might want to give it another look.

                            There's an "A. Littlewood" on the Blandford team in 1888. Alfred Littlewood, M.A., was the Vicar of Turnworth in 1881 and in 1891 he was the Rector of Stickland, just west of Blandford. He was sixty years old.

                            There is an 'A. Daniell' also on the Blandford team. George Daniell was a surgeon and farmer who lived near the Farquharsons in Langton Long, Blandford. His son Arthur Daniell would have been only 18. He started at Cambridge that October and became a schoolmaster.

                            Swinburne-Hanham was the solicitor and JP I mentioned earlier.

                            It looks like a hodge-podge mix of prominent families in the area, but some haven't been identified.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Simon Wood View Post
                              And to think, Druitt would have to have been aware of all the train times,

                              Yes, as if Druitt could have the kind of genius required to have enquired about train times at some point before the game.

                              the early closing,

                              Which is irrelevant. He’d have known the time that the game started. We don’t.

                              the possibility of the cricket match going on too long and scuppering his plans,

                              Which makes the assumption that serial killers always plan days in advance or that they always act logically.

                              thinking up a reason to explain his sudden dash to London,

                              Why did he need a reason? If he had intended to return to play for another team why would this team have needed to know? ‘I have to go back to London on business,’ would have covered any enquiry should there have been one. This is hardly Professor Moriarty-type deviousness is it?

                              the logistics of dumping his cricket attire in a place and manner that wouldn't attract attention

                              He leaves it with a friend. A friend drops it at the family home. He takes it with him and drops it off when he gets to London. It’s a cricket bag not a piano.

                              and change into clothing which accommodated a knife

                              Yes a knife and not a javelin. Clothing that might include a coat pocket, or trousers with a waistband or socks.

                              he had previously secreted, knowing the East End and where and when to murder his next unfortunate,

                              I doubt if he had his eye on a particular victim. Walking into the East End would hardly have been difficult. Avoiding bumping into one would have been much harder.

                              discovering which unfortunates couldn't afford their bed for the night and would be tramping the streets whenever he happened to arrive,

                              This comment would have raised an eyebrow coming from a newcomer to the case Simon but from a man that’s been researching it for so many years! Are you seriously suggesting that he would have had trouble finding a prostitute that was up for business?

                              and then, once the deed was done, having to cleanse himself of blood before going through the same travel rigmarole in reverse,

                              Where he would have had hours to have done just that.

                              arriving in Wimborne, once again secreting the knife

                              Was the knife somehow attached to him? Would the idea of leaving it in London have escaped him?

                              and changing into his whites in time for another rousing game of cricket.

                              If you believe this, or any variations of it, you need help.

                              Because of course we know from serial killer history and research that after a murder they all sit alone in a room a gibberish, foaming-at-the-mouth wreck unable to face the outside world. If a serial killer commits a murder they don’t get a day off Simon. They continue as normal. That’s just what happens so why is Druitt lumbered with a different set of criteria to others.

                              Stay happy.

                              Simon
                              As I’ve said before I’ve zero issue with anyone calling him a poor suspect. It doesn’t matter a jot but why do you try and make it appear impossible or unlikely by some gross exaggeration of very minor points?
                              Regards

                              Michael🔎


                              " When you eliminate the impossible whatever remains no matter how improbable......is probably a little bit boring "

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post
                                Chris -- Here are some more information, but you might want to give it another look.

                                There's an "A. Littlewood" on the Blandford team in 1888. Alfred Littlewood, M.A., was the Vicar of Turnworth in 1881 and in 1891 he was the Rector of Stickland, just west of Blandford. He was sixty years old.

                                There is an 'A. Daniell' also on the Blandford team. George Daniell was a surgeon and farmer who lived near the Farquharsons in Langton Long, Blandford. His son Arthur Daniell would have been only 18. He started at Cambridge that October and became a schoolmaster.

                                Swinburne-Hanham was the solicitor and JP I mentioned earlier.

                                It looks like a hodge-podge mix of prominent families in the area, but some haven't been identified.
                                So far Roger it looks more like a team of ‘gentlemen.’ We know that there were many gentleman’s teams in those days and that at a higher level there were Gentleman vs Players matches were the two teams emerged onto the field of play via separate gates. This continued well into the 20th century. I don’t know this for anything like a fact but it’s probable that at some point Druitt might have played for a gentleman’s team. You wouldn’t have found the local refuse collector playing for the Blackheath Cub for example.
                                Regards

                                Michael🔎


                                " When you eliminate the impossible whatever remains no matter how improbable......is probably a little bit boring "

                                Comment

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