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Proof of Innocence?

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  • The first match on a Saturday - no Druitt. Probably not needed for home fixture. Not a huge scoring game either. Yet it didn't finish. A long lunch or a late start - or both
    I wonder how the make up of the teams compare.

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    • A 4.00 p.m. start - or even 4.15 - to coincide with early closing is looking increasingly likely.

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      • Gary do my eyes deceive me or were all those Croydon area matches at 2.30, 3.00 and 3.15?

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        • Originally posted by Chris Phillips View Post
          We've been discussing the "return match" on 30 August, This looks to me like the first match, played at Wareham on 21 July, as reported by the Blandford Weekly News on 28 July 1888. No Druitt, but still a win for the Isle of Purbeck on the first innings, "time not allowing the game to be finished":

          Click image for larger version

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          This is one for Mike.

          Who’s the third player on the Blandford list?

          The game’s A. Foot.

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          • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post

            And no accident that Thursday was both early closing day and the day favoured for mid-week cricket matches.
            E. O. Richards who was on the committee, and who also played cricket that day, was a wine and spirits merchant. I don't know if that complicates his motives for early closing or not.

            His family had something like 1,900 acres or more near Wimborne Minster--Druitt country--and had a whole mob of employees--nearly 50 of them. He's in the 1881 census under Edward Owen Richards in Wimborne, a visitor.

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            • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
              Gary do my eyes deceive me or were all those Croydon area matches at 2.30, 3.00 and 3.15?
              They do deceive you, some of them were at 3.30.

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              • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post

                This is one for Mike.

                Who’s the third player on the Blandford list?

                The game’s A. Foot.
                It’s my great grandfather Ebeneezer Banks.
                Regards

                Michael🔎


                " When you eliminate the impossible whatever remains no matter how improbable......is probably a little bit boring "

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                • Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post

                  E. O. Richards who was on the committee, and who also played cricket that day, was a wine and spirits merchant. I don't know if that complicates his motives for early closing or not.

                  His family had something like 1,900 acres or more near Wimborne Minster--Druitt country--and had a whole mob of employees--nearly 50 of them. He's in the 1881 census under Edward Owen Richards in Wimborne, a visitor.
                  Wholesale or retail, I wonder?

                  I should know the answer to this, but I think back in the day the retailing of ‘off licence’ alcohol was regulated in the same way pubs were.

                  Keep up the good work, R. J. I’m trying to resist going too deeply into this particular rabbit hole. I already have a predisposition towards all things Dorset and I could easily spend days on end researching the subject.



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                  • Originally posted by Michael Banks View Post

                    It’s my great grandfather Ebeneezer Banks.
                    No that’s the Purbeck team. I meant A. Foot - it was meant to be a Holmesian reference.

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                    • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post

                      No that’s the Purbeck team. I meant A. Foot - it was meant to be a Holmesian reference.
                      Sorry Gary, I went straight to the name Banks.
                      Regards

                      Michael🔎


                      " When you eliminate the impossible whatever remains no matter how improbable......is probably a little bit boring "

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                      • Yes, some matches began at 2.30 or 3.30, etc. but it's just as easy to find reports like the one below. The game started at noon, and there was a lunch break at 2.00 pm


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                        This match was on a Friday, but there are also a few Thursday games that mention luncheon breaks. With nothing definitive, I'll wait to see if Edward Stow can bring us any joy.

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                        • Originally posted by Michael Banks View Post

                          Sorry Gary, I went straight to the name Banks.
                          I haven’t looked this up, but I believe the Bankes family were very prominent in Purbeck. Ed will know, I think he knows the area quite well. I got married in Bournemouth, but it’s West Dorset I know best. If R.J. finds a connection to Lyme Regis I’m done for.

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                          • Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post
                            Yes, some matches began at 2.30 or 3.30, etc. but it's just as easy to find reports like the one below. The game started at noon, and there was a lunch break at 2.00 pm


                            Click image for larger version Name:	Luncheon Break.jpg Views:	0 Size:	82.6 KB ID:	588696



                            This match was on a Friday, but there are also a few Thursday games that mention luncheon breaks. With nothing definitive, I'll wait to see if Edward Stow can bring us any joy.
                            Yes, I was challenging the idea that a 4.00 start was out of the question.

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                            • In 1889 it seems the finances of the Recreation Ground came under some scrutiny. It appears it was only being kept afloat by the generosity of wealthy locals. In that context, the idea of cricket matches being played on a Thursday and timed to take advantage of early closing makes perfect sense.

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                              • The whole thing makes perfect sense... unless one has a predisposition to want to get poor Montague up to London that night...

                                And needless to say, I always endeavour to bring joy.
                                There is a saying... just can't remember it.

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