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Proof of Innocence?

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  • I suspect the games had an agreed end time irrespective of the train times.
    To get to Wareham from Blandford you had to change at Wimborne.
    It is of course possible the the development of village and County cricket was dependent on the development of the rail network.

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    • If charabancs were commonly used one might expect to be able to find cheery posed pictures of cricketers.
      Or was it the case that in away fixtures, the away team would fill their places with reasonably well off people like Druitt who weren't necessarily from the locale, to avoid the embarrassment of a gifted batsman-come-farm labourer not being able to afford a room for the night in the Railway Hotel, still less be able to handle a knife and fork at the evening dinner?

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      • I’m not sure of the practicalities of a charabanc service between Blandford and Wareham (a distance of 16 miles) but in 1915, the members of the Blandford Branch of the British Women’s Temperance Association travelled to Dorchester (18 miles away) by charabanc.
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        • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
          Chris the cricket club haven't replied yet but I will chase them up.

          Note that after the Blandford players left Ringwood at 6.30, a scratch match was due to take place. This being a ah hoc affair involving anyone who could be rustled together to play.
          Thanks. I don't think it's out of the question Club records would have survived. I remember as a child discovering some ancient cricket documents in the garden shed of an elderly relative. The one that struck in my mind what a poem - or at least a lengthy piece of doggerel - about a particular match. Having said that, I don't know what happened to those documents when the relative went into a home.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Edward Stow View Post
            If charabancs were commonly used one might expect to be able to find cheery posed pictures of cricketers.
            Or was it the case that in away fixtures, the away team would fill their places with reasonably well off people like Druitt who weren't necessarily from the locale, to avoid the embarrassment of a gifted batsman-come-farm labourer not being able to afford a room for the night in the Railway Hotel, still less be able to handle a knife and fork at the evening dinner?
            I doubt they travelled in their whites.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
              I’m not sure of the practicalities of a charabanc service between Blandford and Wareham (a distance of 16 miles) but in 1915, the members of the Blandford Branch of the British Women’s Temperance Association travelled to Dorchester (18 miles away) by charabanc.
              I sincerely hope that's not a photo of the British Women's Temperance Association!

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Chris Phillips View Post

                I sincerely hope that's not a photo of the British Women's Temperance Association!
                No it wasn’t. It was a service that operated in Yeovil and the photo was of a works outing.

                I’ve now switched it for a more genteel looking group including a man in white trousers and a few ladies.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Christer Holmgren View Post
                  Edward Stow has presented a time table based route, taking Druitt from Blandford Station to Waterloo station, starting out at 4.55 from Blandford and arriving nigh on seven hours later to Waterloo, namely at 11.41. To be exact, it makes for a six hour and 56 minute trip (after which Druitt would have to walk to eastern Whitechapel, but let´s leave that aside for now).
                  Hi Christer - Thanks, but I am a little hesitant to respond, because you clearly aren't reading my posts very carefully.

                  I already posted a timetable showing that MJD could have left Blandford at the same 4.55 time and had been in Waterloo at 9.50--if he went by way of Bournemouth West. See post number 410

                  That shaves off two hours and makes the trip less of a psychological barrier.

                  Originally posted by Christer Holmgren View Post
                  in 1888, it was the equivalent of driving from London to the Scottish border today or, for that matter, flying from London to New York.
                  And?

                  Druitt is only 31. We know nearly nothing about his habits to know what might entice him to London if he had a 40-hour window. If he was 'sexually insane' (which I take to mean a sex addict) the lure of London could have been great. It depends on what he was 'into.' Surely London offered pleasures he could not readily find among the clergymen on the Isle of Purbeck?

                  I had another co-worker who was a pill popper. On Saturdays he would drive over 650 km to Canada to buy over-the-counter codeine (an opiate) which was not available in the U.S. I believe he stayed overnight and returned in the morning but don't really know. Addicts do the darndest things.

                  In short, we don't know enough about Druitt's private life to know whether or not this whirlwind trip would be characteristic or not. Some impulses are greater than salmon fishing.

                  Salmon swimming upstream to spawn might be a better analogy.

                  Cheers, and my apologies for lumping you together with Edward and Mark as a Lechmere-injector. Consider it collateral damage.

                  [P.S. Here's something strange: when I wrote "Post 410" using the standard hashtag #, it changes to a red link reading "Albert Victor." Why on earth might that be? It does it every time. Try it and see]

                  Comment


                  • And Christer - I also knew an Asian fellow who was a gambling addict and used to leave work in the afternoon and do all-night trips to a casino. This was a hell of a long roundtrip drive. Yet, by morning, he'd be back to work.

                    No one had any idea of what he was doing until one time he drove his car into a ditch on his return drive. He was staying up 48 hours at a whack.

                    The assumption is that Druitt was going to London because he was a serial-killer. I don't make that assumption, and, even if he was, it wouldn't mean that he only had one bad habit. There are a lot of vices that lead to extreme behaviors. Drugs. Women. Boys. Gambling, etc.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post

                      Hi Christer - Thanks, but I am a little hesitant to respond, because you clearly aren't reading my posts very carefully.

                      I already posted a timetable showing that MJD could have left Blandford at the same 4.55 time and had been in Waterloo at 9.50--if he went by way of Bournemouth West. See post number 410

                      That shaves off two hours and make the trip less of a psychological barrier.



                      And?

                      Druitt is only 31. We know nearly nothing about his habits to know what might entice him to London if he had a 40-hour window. If he was 'sexually insane' (which I take to mean a sex addict) the lure of London could have been great. It depends on what he was 'into.' Surely London offered pleasures he could not readily find among the clergymen on the Isle of Purbeck?

                      I had another co-worker who was a pill popper. On Saturdays he would drive over 650 km to Canada to buy over-the-counter codeine (an opiate) which was not available in the U.S. I believe he stayed overnight and returned in the morning but don't really know. Addicts do the darndest things.

                      In short, we don't know enough about Druitt's private life to know whether or not this whirlwind trip would be characteristic or not. Some impulses are greater than salmon fishing.

                      Salmon swimming upstream to spawn might be a better analogy.

                      Cheers, and my apologies for lumping you together with Edward and Mark as a Lechmere-injector. Consider it collateral damage.

                      [P.S. Here's something strange: when I wrote "Post 410" using the standard hashtag, it changes to a red link reading "Albert Victor." Why on earth might that be? It does it every time. Try it and see]
                      I shall have to commit myself more to your posts, apparently. Sorry for that miss. But it nevertheless remains that we are speaking of a five hour journey. Each way. I think that needs to be pointed out, since you spoke of how people having gone out to the countryside outside London were sometimes likely to be called back there. And just as I said - and regardless of we are speaking of a five or a seven hour journey - even if looks close enough today to go from Dorset to London, it was not a quick affair back in 1888. It was quite an undertaking.

                      I also think I was clear on how neither I nor anybody else seem to think it would be impossible for Druitt to pop over to London from Dorset - if the timetables allowed for it (which we still don´t know). That was never the issue. What I questioned was whether it was a likely thing or not, and in that respect I myself consider it far likelier that he stayed put in Dorset, having family ties close by and having another cricket game coming up. It makes much more sense that way to me.

                      As for you working from the assumption that I must have been the one injecting Lechmere to the Druitt discussion, I can only say that I am, generally speaking, in no way surprised or unfamiliar with the phenomenon.

                      PS. In a sense, the defense for Druitt is doing what it always does, accepts that he could have been an exception to the rule. In this case, as we will both acknowledge, people who travel long distances to visit an area for three days are less likely than not to yo-yo back to the starting point on day two. But yes, there are exceptions.
                      "In these matters it is the little things that tell the tales" - Coroner Wynne Baxter during the Nichols inquest.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by R. J. Palmer View Post
                        And Christer - I also knew an Asian fellow who was a gambling addict and used to leave work in the afternoon and do all-night trips to a casino. This was a hell of a long roundtrip drive. Yet, by morning, he'd be back to work.

                        No one had any idea of what he was doing until one time he drove his car into a ditch on his return drive. He was staying up 48 hours at a whack.

                        The assumption is that Druitt was going to London because he was a serial-killer. I don't make that assumption, and, even if he was, it wouldn't mean that he only had one bad habit. There's a lot of vices that lead to extreme behaviors. Drugs. Women. Boys. Gambling, etc.
                        Yes, someone else experienced something similar recently. I think it must be a new feature of vBulletin.

                        I can't work out how to put a hash into a post if you need to.

                        (Edit: I think I replied to the wrong post. I didn't mean to says that vices leading to extreme behaviours was a new feature of vBulletin. I was talking about hashes followed by numbers being converted into hashtags.)

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Phil Kellingley View Post

                          Are you going to bore us some more with your "I don't really think it was Druitt but I'm going to continue to argue that it was"? You are getting really tedious now.
                          And I think that I’ve experienced your Macnaughten diatribe before. I say what I’ve said on this subject numerous times here and on casebook but you just claim to be able to know what I’m thinking whilst conveniently ignoring what I say so that you can prolong your moment in the spotlight with your obsessive claims that your opinions should be treated as facts by everyone else. I’d say that you have a Macnaughten complex.

                          I have no interest in anything you say so post whatever you want. Gary’s advice is good advice.
                          Regards

                          Michael🔎


                          " When you eliminate the impossible whatever remains no matter how improbable......is probably a little bit boring "

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post

                            Mike,

                            I would just ignore him. Feeding trolls is always a waste of time. He obviously has nothing of any relevance to add to the thread. Starved of attention, he’ll probably move off to another bridge.

                            Gary
                            Good advice Gary
                            Regards

                            Michael🔎


                            " When you eliminate the impossible whatever remains no matter how improbable......is probably a little bit boring "

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Chris Phillips View Post

                              Thanks. I don't think it's out of the question Club records would have survived. I remember as a child discovering some ancient cricket documents in the garden shed of an elderly relative. The one that struck in my mind what a poem - or at least a lengthy piece of doggerel - about a particular match. Having said that, I don't know what happened to those documents when the relative went into a home.
                              Cricket enthusiasts tend to be big on statistics and tradition Chris, so the relevant score book might still survive somewhere.
                              Regards

                              Michael🔎


                              " When you eliminate the impossible whatever remains no matter how improbable......is probably a little bit boring "

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
                                I’m not sure of the practicalities of a charabanc service between Blandford and Wareham (a distance of 16 miles) but in 1915, the members of the Blandford Branch of the British Women’s Temperance Association travelled to Dorchester (18 miles away) by charabanc.
                                wow thats quite a photo! now im intrigued what you posted before lol!

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