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Prince Eddy Again

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  • Prince Eddy Again

    Now, I admit this is only an anecdote but none the less interesting for all that. My wife told me a number of years ago that her mother knew several people who worked at Kensington Palace and they heard stories from servants there who had parents and grandparents who knew Prince Albert Edward Victor. The gossip among them was that no one should be alone with him and that it was pretty much common knowledge that he was our man. Alexandra, the Danish princess who was later to become wife of Nicholas 11 of Russia, steadfastly refused to marry him and he was turned down by more than one princess in his family's efforts to get him married off.

    Now, I know that Eddy has supposedly cast-iron alibis on the nights of the murders, but is it really beyond the capacity of those close to him to manufacture alibis?

  • #2
    Some of Eddie's alibis were royal appointments, weren't they? If so, they'd have been made well in advance of any given murder.
    Kind regards, Sam Flynn

    "Suche Nullen"
    (F. Nietzsche)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
      Some of Eddie's alibis were royal appointments, weren't they? If so, they'd have been made well in advance of any given murder.
      Thanks for that. Not an expert by any means on royal protocol, but is it not at least possible that he could be substituted on the days in question by another/lesser Royal?

      Comment


      • #4
        I seem to recall that his attendance at at least one of these events was confirmed in the papers. I could be wrong on that, as I've not really paid much attention to the Royal Conspiracy theory for well over a decade.
        Kind regards, Sam Flynn

        "Suche Nullen"
        (F. Nietzsche)

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        • #5
          I am pretty sure you are correct, Gareth.

          Someone in the know would need to have impersonated Eddie without anyone realising it - unless everyone present was in on it.

          Mind you, I'm sure there were many young men around at the time who'd have been willing to pull it off for a few bob.
          I wish I were two puppies then I could play together - Storm Petersen

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Caroline Brown View Post
            I'm sure there were many young men around at the time who'd have been willing to pull it off for a few bob.
            There were some in Albert Victor's circle, perhaps even PAV himself, who'd have been delighted to find some young men willing to pull it off for a few bob.
            Kind regards, Sam Flynn

            "Suche Nullen"
            (F. Nietzsche)

            Comment


            • #7
              That is fascinating information, Stuart! I have been thinking a lot lately about how/why Prince Eddy ever got named in this mess. I almost started a Points to Ponder but figured I just had not read enough on the subject.

              Maybe he forced his attentions on the palace staff and tales built up from there? How much would it take before someone said, "He's a regular Jack the Ripper?" From there the idea could be expanded upon.

              Prince Eddy kept a diary. He was in love with Princess Alix (Alice) of Hess Darmstadt--the future Tsarina Alexandra Feodorovna-- who seems to have been visiting her grandmother Queen Victoria in 1888. If you read other newspaper stories attached to JtR reports, there are a few about the Queen and visiting granddaughter Princess Alice going for rides in a carriage.

              There were several entries in the prince's diary about his interest in Princess Alice and I think this was in 1888.

              Extensive history on the Russian royal family says Alix and the future tsar fell in love at a family event prior to 1888. That does not mean they were promised to each other and there were obstacles before they could be married but I have considered this as a major reason why Alix did not want to marry Prince Eddy.

              If the prince had severe problems or there were terrible suspicions, would the family have proceeded to find any wife for him? As it was, Mary of Teck was his fiancee just prior to his death. If he was suspected of being JtR, would the family take the risk that he could/would severely damage a foreign princess?
              The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

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              • #8
                Isn't it the case that Prince Eddy's name only got dragged into Ripper lore because of Stephen Knight's book, and the self-admitted "whopping fib" of his source, Joseph Gorman? Happy to be corrected if there's an earlier precedent.
                Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                "Suche Nullen"
                (F. Nietzsche)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                  Isn't it the case that Prince Eddy's name only got dragged into Ripper lore because of Stephen Knight's book, and the self-admitted "whopping fib" of his source, Joseph Gorman? Happy to be corrected if there's an earlier precedent.
                  Stewart Evans wrote a great dissertation which is available at Casebook, tracing the Prince Eddy connection back quite a way. It goes back farther than I had thought because my reasoning had led me to believe what you say. I never previously looked into the subject because early on I rejected the Ripper and Royals yarn.
                  The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

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                  • #10
                    Thanks, Anna - I'll check it out. I'd quite forgotten about that dissertation, but I must have read it at some point, given its author. Like I said, I haven't paid much attention to the Royal Conspiracy for ages, so that might explain my memory lapse.
                    Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                    "Suche Nullen"
                    (F. Nietzsche)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hi Sam,


                      The idea of PAV being Jack the Ripper was first made public by Dr. Thomas Stowell in an article for Criminologist magazine in 1970. The Joseph Gorman story appeared in a BBC serial televised in, I think 1973, followed soon after by Stephen Knight's book.


                      The real question, to me at least, is where and when Dr. Stowell first heard of the story.


                      Rgds
                      John

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                      • #12
                        Stowell, of course. Thanks, John. That said, we're still talking about PAV only emerging as a suspect in the early 1970s, or thereabouts.

                        As to Stowell's source, might it have been Gorman himself?
                        Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                        "Suche Nullen"
                        (F. Nietzsche)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Stowell told part of the story to Colin Wilson in 1960, following Wilson's articles in the Evening Standard. In 1970 he said he had known for nearly fifty years, indicating that he came across the evidence around 1920. His claimed source was Caroline Acland, Gull's daughter, who was married to Stowell's friend and teacher, Theodore Acland.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Paul Williams View Post
                            Stowell told part of the story to Colin Wilson in 1960, following Wilson's articles in the Evening Standard. In 1970 he said he had known for nearly fifty years, indicating that he came across the evidence around 1920. His claimed source was Caroline Acland, Gull's daughter, who was married to Stowell's friend and teacher, Theodore Acland.
                            So, who was Stowell and was he reliable, etc.? It doesn't make sense that Gull's daughter would tell such a story unless she had serious problems in life. I mean, if she was a member of the upper class as the doctor's daughter, why would she risk social position and whatever else by telling such a story?

                            That sort of falls in the category of "My Father Killed the Black Dahlia" and though that sort of thing is practically an industry now, it would have brought disgrace on a family or anyone telling such a tale at the beginning of the last century.
                            The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

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                            • #15
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