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Sickert's Lodger theory

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  • Michael Banks
    replied
    Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
    Whistler's Murder?

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  • Anna Morris
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul View Post
    I don't think Wynne Weston-Davies could answer our questions about Sickert. I seem to recall that he recalled only what he wrote, namely that Sickert was obsessed with the murders but didn't know anything.
    I never worked out dates on the calendar but had the idea Dr. Weston-Davies may have heard Sickert expound? If not, maybe he has other information within his family that could shed light on the questions.

    I think there is something to Patricia Cornwell's work in general and I think Sickert decorated the 'Lizard guest book' that Cornwell now owns. Maybe something can be gleaned from his dated art to give an idea what he was thinking and when.

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  • Paul
    replied
    Originally posted by Anna Morris View Post
    When Dr. Wynn Weston-Davies was promoting his book here, he mentioned in a podcast that his family knew Sickert. He said Sickert was obsessed by the murders and would talk on the subject for hours but that he knew nothing.

    I wonder if Dr. Weston-Davies might be able to answer some of the questions posed here?

    Through various works I have the idea Sickert was, to use someone else's idea, one of the first Ripperologists.
    I don't think Wynne Weston-Davies could answer our questions about Sickert. I seem to recall that he recalled only what he wrote, namely that Sickert was obsessed with the murders but didn't know anything.

    Leave a comment:


  • Anna Morris
    replied
    When Dr. Wynn Weston-Davies was promoting his book here, he mentioned in a podcast that his family knew Sickert. He said Sickert was obsessed by the murders and would talk on the subject for hours but that he knew nothing.

    I wonder if Dr. Weston-Davies might be able to answer some of the questions posed here?

    Through various works I have the idea Sickert was, to use someone else's idea, one of the first Ripperologists.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Banks View Post
    the story about Whistler planning to do a painting of a ripper victim.
    Whistler's Murder?

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Banks View Post
    It would certainly be fascinating to find out where these stories actually originated.
    That's the view Keith Skinner and I have shared for the past thirty odd years.

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  • Michael Banks
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul View Post
    Yes, I was also invited to the book launch at a gallery in London where I was surrounded by Sickert paintings! The Whistler story is interesting, I think. There is definitely something at the back of all the Ripper themes connecting back to Sickert and his circle; I'm not suggesting that he was Jack the Ripper, of course.
    It would certainly be fascinating to find out where these stories actually originated.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Banks View Post
    Thanks for that Paul. I still find it interesting though.

    Iíve just finished the book and Iím now encouraged to get his biography of Wilde. I noticed that you get a mention regarding the story about Whistler planning to do a painting of a ripper victim.
    Yes, I was also invited to the book launch at a gallery in London where I was surrounded by Sickert paintings! The Whistler story is interesting, I think. There is definitely something at the back of all the Ripper themes connecting back to Sickert and his circle; I'm not suggesting that he was Jack the Ripper, of course.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Banks
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul View Post
    I think it must be an error by Matthew, rather than Nick, but as I don't have the latter's articles immediately to hand, I can't say. What we don't know is that Ride was ever resident at 6 Mornington Crescent. He was simply the only Royal Veterinary College student to have abandoned his studies before the end of 1888. And, of course, whilst R.E. Waller did live at 6 Mornington Crescent in 1891, we don't know that he was there in 1888. Nothing has moved us along very far, alas.
    Thanks for that Paul. I still find it interesting though.

    Iíve just finished the book and Iím now encouraged to get his biography of Wilde. I noticed that you get a mention regarding the story about Whistler planning to do a painting of a ripper victim.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Banks View Post
    Hi Paul,

    I wonder if it was an error by Sturgis or Warren himself that resulted in the name being given as Reid rather than Ride?

    If we found out that he died from syphilis we might have another suspect to add to the list.

    I think it must be an error by Matthew, rather than Nick, but as I don't have the latter's articles immediately to hand, I can't say. What we don't know is that Ride was ever resident at 6 Mornington Crescent. He was simply the only Royal Veterinary College student to have abandoned his studies before the end of 1888. And, of course, whilst R.E. Waller did live at 6 Mornington Crescent in 1891, we don't know that he was there in 1888. Nothing has moved us along very far, alas.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Banks
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul View Post
    I'll need to check this out, but Joseph Ride was the only student at the Royal Veterinary College who cut short his studies before the end of 1888, in which year he was 27. When he died is not currently known.

    The 1891 Census records that living at 6 Mornington Crescent was an Egyptian-born medical student, R.E. Waller (born c.1871).
    Hi Paul,

    I wonder if it was an error by Sturgis or Warren himself that resulted in the name being given as Reid rather than Ride?

    If we found out that he died from syphilis we might have another suspect to add to the list.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Banks
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Williams View Post
    I looked briefly at Reid/Ride when researching my suspect book but omitted him when unable to find evidence that he died in Bournemouth 1888/89 or sight the original article by Nick Warren.

    I was unaware of the Camden History Newsletter and have just contacted the society to ask if they can provide a copy. I'll share this when received.
    Cheers Paul. I look forward to hearing what they say.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Williams View Post
    I looked briefly at Reid/Ride when researching my suspect book but omitted him when unable to find evidence that he died in Bournemouth 1888/89 or sight the original article by Nick Warren.

    I was unaware of the Camden History Newsletter and have just contacted the society to ask if they can provide a copy. I'll share this when received.
    I'll need to check this out, but Joseph Ride was the only student at the Royal Veterinary College who cut short his studies before the end of 1888, in which year he was 27. When he died is not currently known.

    The 1891 Census records that living at 6 Mornington Crescent was an Egyptian-born medical student, R.E. Waller (born c.1871).

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Williams
    replied
    I looked briefly at Reid/Ride when researching my suspect book but omitted him when unable to find evidence that he died in Bournemouth 1888/89 or sight the original article by Nick Warren.

    I was unaware of the Camden History Newsletter and have just contacted the society to ask if they can provide a copy. I'll share this when received.

    Leave a comment:


  • Phillip Walton
    replied
    I would start by looking at the BMD registers for Bournmouth, the death registers for 1888/89 in particular. This can be followed up with a search of the 1871 and 1881 census returns.

    Leave a comment:

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