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G.Wentworth Bell Smith

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Thanks a lot R.J. !


    South Wales Echo
    September 21, 1889
    *****************




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  • R. J. Palmer
    replied
    I was going to upload an article from the New York Herald (London edition) which refers, I believe, to the suspect H. Wentworth Bellsmith, but I see the same basic article is available on-line in the South Wales Echo, so if you aren't familiar with it just follow the link below; second column. This was a sort of first ever "Ripper Conference," circa 1889. The 'mechanical engineer' appears to be our old friend Mr. Callahan from the Met files. There is also an interesting attempt to link Bellsmith's alleged accomplice "Dodger" to 'John Cleary' of the Pinchin Street murder.

    http://newspapers.library.wales/view...3/33/LIVERPOOL

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  • Anna Morris
    replied
    Originally posted by Dave Knott View Post
    How,

    I wouldn't say that there is anything in particular in the book that seems relevant to the events of 1888.

    Stan,

    I was not aware of Callaghan going to Swanson, only of Swanson going to Forbes Winslow after the latter had started boasting to the newspapers. With regard to date changing, it will be remembered that Winslow produced a letter supposedly received from the killer where the date had clearly been altered from 1889 to 1888 [see The Bloody Truth by Melvin Harris] so he may well have altered the 9th to the 7th.

    For those of you with Letters From Hell, take a look at the rhyming letter of 8 November 1889 to the Superintendent of Great Scotland Yard. This clearly relates to Bellsmith [whose book also contains large sections of rhyming verse]


    David
    Bellsmith's book, "contains large sections of rhyming verse?" How does his rhyming verse compare to rhymes in the Maybrick diary? Just curious.

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Thanks a lot, Rajah !!

    Welcome back.

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  • R. J. Palmer
    replied
    It's usually stated that H. Wentworth Bellsmith lived in Toronto, which is "sort of" true, but it is a little more complicated; his original residence was actually in Collingwood, Ontario, which is about 90 miles north.

    The earliest that any Bellsmith is listed in Toronto (that I can confirm) was his older brother, the artist, Frederick M. Bellsmith, who is listed in the 1877 City Directory as living at No. 134 St. Patrick Street. John Bellsmith, the father is listed in 1883 and 1884, died thereafter, but his wife (Henry's mother) stayed around town until around 1890, though I should firm up the exact date. She is listed as a widow in 1885.

    Meanwhile, our Henry makes his first appearance in 1887:

    Bellsmith, H. Wentworth (Bellsmith & Harrison) resides Collingwood, Ontario.

    This business partner was Arthur W. Harrison "brokers & financial agents" located at No. 30 Adelaide, Toronto, which was across from the main post-office. (Btw., F. Tumblety stayed briefly at No. 42 Adelaide, the residence of his nephew, a few years earlier. He is gone by 1881).

    So Mr. Henry Wentworth Bellsmith, the suspect, or alleged suspect, was a stock broker, among other things. In 1887 this business is more or less failing.

    Bellsmith disappears from the directory in 1888 (he is in London part of that time), but reappears in 1889 with a new firm:

    Bellsmith, Henry W. (Donaldson, Milne, and Bell-Smith) h. 461 Parliament.

    His sisters Amelia and Gertrude, unmarried, are living next door at No. 463 Parliament.

    H.W.B. is now in Toronto full-time; we know that he is having marital difficulties and soon after takes up with another woman that he may or may not have legally married, and, as noted earlier in this thread, by the early 1890 he is living in Brooklyn. Which brings me to the following.

    In a 1897 review of his strange novel Henry Cadavere (I, Henry, the Dead Corpse), Publisher's Weekly writes:

    "Henry Wentworth Bellsmith "well-known to the trade from his connection to the "International News Company..."

    So this gives a clue to his employer. The International News Company was a distributor of foreign (mainly British) books, newspapers, and periodicals located at 85 and 87 Duane Street, which is lower Manhattan, NYC, the Big Apple, near the corner of Broadway. It was a rather large concern, employing over 100 people, and it seems probable that H.W.B. was working in the accounting department, since he is sometimes listed in Brooklyn as being an accountant.

    Here is a blub on the company:

    “In 1872 the Willmer & Rogers News Company, as it was then known, joined forces with the American News Company and was reorganized as the International News Company, at 29 and 31 Beekman Street [New York], Mr. Willmer becoming the directing manager. In a short time the International News Company became one of the most important book, newspaper, and periodical importing houses in the United States, the business quickly growing to such proportions that it became necessary to find two buildings at 85 and 87 Duane Street, to accommodate it.”

    In June, 1887, Charles Knight Willmer became the secretary of the organization. His father was the proprietor and editor of the Liverpool Mercury. (from Publishers Weekly, 1908) Nothing really earth shattering about any of this, of course.

    Concerning the confusion between H.W.Bellsmith and his brother H.S. Bellsmith, the photographer, the following blurb from 1887 probably does not help:

    "Photographers’ Association of America
    President G. Cramer, St. Louis
    Treasurer, G. M. Carlise, Providence (R.I.)
    Secretary, H.W. Bellsmith
    The 1887 meeting will be held in Chicago."


    Unless, through a series of misprints they keep getting the middle initial wrong (which seems doubtful) Henry Wentworth was also "into" photography (evidently at an amateur level) and was Secretary of the Association. Not yet proven, but highly probable to me.

    I will have a few more things to toss up as time permits.

    I usually don't like it when various theorists/historians link two suspects together, and I am not stating nor insisting there is a connection, but for many years it has teased the back of my brain that two suspects brought to the attention of the police in 1888 came to London by way of Toronto, and both were said to frequent boarding houses and both raved about fallen women. There is also the oddity that Inspector Andrews is spending his time in Autumn 1888 investigating a third man from Toronto, Roland Barnett. This is always assumed to be entirely coincidental, but I, for one, don't know that, and don't assume it. Sometimes you flip over rocks looking for bugs, and you find a snake.

    Tumilty, the child of the famine, was not sophisticated when it came to handling his money, though he did love to play the stock-market, and throughout his life he was always able to rope in various young men to handle his finances. It often backfired on him, but that is neither here nor there. I am not insisting that Bellsmith was one such individual, but I think at least it might be "on the table." It is interesting that when the heat was really coming down on the doctor's head--the first week of November, 1888--- H. Wentworth Bellsmith gets on a passenger ship at Southhampton and gets the hell out of Dodge. He doesn't even bother to go to Liverpool first. Coincidence? Probably, but interesting. Some years ago Tim Riordan attempted to bolster the supposed 'closeness' between Mark Blackburn and Tumilty by stating that Blackburn named his first son "Francis." Working hypothesis at best, but "fair enough." On the otherhand, one could perhaps say the same thing about H.W. Bellsmith who's oldest child is "Francis." One could say it....but not me....

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  • Debra Arif
    replied
    Originally posted by Jerry Dunlop View Post
    Good deal. Thanks Debs,

    I don't have a sub to MyHeritage but am wondering if there is a chance the other gentleman in this family picture with Frederick Marlett Bellsmith is Henry W. Bellsmith? Maybe too young?

    https://www.google.com/search?q=haro...BSTZel2pcUM%3A
    I logged in with an old account (didn't need a sub) and checked the family site out but neither Henry or Harold are mentioned. There is a list of the people in that photo but no Henry. It's the family of Frederick M Bellsmith snr.

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  • Jerry Dunlop
    replied
    Originally posted by Debra Arif View Post
    Yes that's him Jerry. Colorado is named as one of the places he was in business in articles about him. He had mentioned in his lectures that he thought that American photographic portraiture was superior in quality and style to the UK (and that is a beautiful portrait in the link) but that UK photographers excelled in landscape photography. He mentioned the English photographer Sutcliffe was among his favourites; this being Frank Meadow Sutcliffe, the Whitby photographer some of us discussed on a thread recently.
    Good deal. Thanks Debs,

    I don't have a sub to MyHeritage but am wondering if there is a chance the other gentleman in this family picture with Frederick Marlett Bellsmith is Henry W. Bellsmith? Maybe too young?

    https://www.google.com/search?q=haro...BSTZel2pcUM%3A

    Leave a comment:


  • Debra Arif
    replied
    Originally posted by Jerry Dunlop View Post
    https://cabinetcardgallery.wordpress...old-bellsmith/

    Wondering if this is the same Harold S Bellsmith in Denver from 1890-1898 listed as a photographer. Must be, no?
    Yes that's him Jerry. Colorado is named as one of the places he was in business in articles about him. He had mentioned in his lectures that he thought that American photographic portraiture was superior in quality and style to the UK (and that is a beautiful portrait in the link) but that UK photographers excelled in landscape photography. He mentioned the English photographer Sutcliffe was among his favourites; this being Frank Meadow Sutcliffe, the Whitby photographer some of us discussed on a thread recently.

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  • Debra Arif
    replied
    Originally posted by Jerry Dunlop View Post
    Hi Debs,

    Here are two links to pictures of Frederick Marlett Bellsmith (b.1846), the older brother of Henry W. Bellsmith (b.1849).

    http://www.mayberryfineart.com/artis...ett_bell-smith

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freder...Bell-Smith.jpg
    Thanks Jerry. I can see the family resemblence.

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  • Jerry Dunlop
    replied
    https://cabinetcardgallery.wordpress...old-bellsmith/

    Wondering if this is the same Harold S Bellsmith in Denver from 1890-1898 listed as a photographer. Must be, no?

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerry Dunlop
    replied
    Originally posted by Debra Arif View Post
    Here's the illustration I posted earlier in the thread which I thought might be of Harold Septimus Bellsmith but wasn't certain as it wasn't labelled. Next to it is a photograph I came across recently of a Frederick M Bellsmith from Canadian WW1 archives. I think there's definitely a resemblence, showing the advert illustration is definitely of Harold Bellsmith who worked for Kodak Eastman.

    [ATTACH]17042[/ATTACH]
    Hi Debs,

    Here are two links to pictures of Frederick Marlett Bellsmith (b.1846), the older brother of Henry W. Bellsmith (b.1849).

    http://www.mayberryfineart.com/artis...ett_bell-smith

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freder...Bell-Smith.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
    How did Terry Thomas get into this?
    Bellsmith - Ding Dong?

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  • Robert Linford
    replied
    How did Terry Thomas get into this?

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  • Debra Arif
    replied
    Henry Cadavere A study of life and work

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  • Debra Arif
    replied
    Susanna and Henry Wentworth Bellsmith's son, Eustace John Bellsmith:

    ej bellsmith.JPG

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