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New Cutbush Book : The Man Who Would Be Jack: The Hunt For Jack The Ripper

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  • Debra Arif
    replied
    I bought the updated book..
    It still reads like a work of well thought out fiction.

    Leave a comment:


  • Debra Arif
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul View Post
    He was put away in Broadmoor, a hospital for the criminally insane, without any evidence of guilt and thus depriving his family having him put in the arguably more genial surroundings of a private asylum, which is what they wanted to do. Is that what's meant?
    Yes, I think that is what AP meant. At the time he was sent to Broadmoor, Thomas Cutbush was on a criminal charge for violent offences involving a knife and waiting to go on trial for it. There was also the witness evidence from one of the female victims who was taken to the asylum to identify Thomas, which she did, positively.
    Given that, how responsible would it have been to send Thomas to a private asylum? Would they have had the ability to cope had he turned out to be dangerously violent?
    Thomas was found unfit to plead. Had he become well again he could have been released to face trial. Being sent to Broadmoor was not a life sentence in itself. People were released from the facility and helped there. There are other cases of people sent to Broadmoor while on a criminal charge but before trial. The Home Office Letter Books have other examples.
    There were other asylums with criminal lunatic wings and no doubt some prisoners were also sent to those facilities without anyone being any the wiser.

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  • Paul
    replied
    Originally posted by Debra Arif View Post
    But there was no sentencing, AP.
    I would be interested in seeing your research evidence that Thomas was treated any differently, or unlawfully.
    He was put away in Broadmoor, a hospital for the criminally insane, without any evidence of guilt and thus depriving his family having him put in the arguably more genial surroundings of a private asylum, which is what they wanted to do. Is that what's meant?

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    April 9, 2017

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Man-Who-Wou.../dp/B06Y28XHM8
    Available in Kindle

    Leave a comment:


  • AP Wolf
    replied
    Personally, I feel that a greater concentration on the Macnaghten Memo has its greater rewards. We know that Macnaghten was either ill informed, or indeed misinformed in regard to many of his statements and claims made in the memo.
    This is understandable, I think, when the man is trotting out suspects whom he claims are more plausible than one Thomas Hayne Cutbush, in other words men, or suspects that Macnaghten had no personal experience or knowledge of, and thus relied on the knowledge and experience of his junior officers.
    But then we come to his statements concerning Thomas Hayne Cutbush.
    Here we deal with an entirely different matter; and one of great concern.
    For Macnaghten claims that his most senior officer at Scotland yard - Charles Henry Cutbush - is a direct and close relation to Thomas Hayne Cutbush. And as I have pointed out on numerous occasions the two men, Charles Henry Cutbush and Macnaghten shared the same suite of offices in Scotland yard, and were in daily contact with one another.
    So, if this is a mistake, then it does outstrip the other errors in the Memo by so many light years that if we blink we might miss it.
    To compound this system of errors I would suggest that the reason Macnaghten claimed that THC's father died while he was very young, was because Charles Henry Cutbush believed that to be the truth, at that time.
    The Sun knew exactly what it was doing, and so did Macnaghten.

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  • Robert Linford
    replied
    Hi Debs

    I think somebody claiming to be a family member once wrote to AP with some choice morsels about CHC, but then disappeared. AP will know more about it.

    Also I heard of a branch in South Africa where the name 'Cutbush' was Not To Be Mentioned.

    Intriguing, but not solid evidence.

    Leave a comment:


  • Debra Arif
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
    Hi Debs

    It's very difficult. I know Jonathan has studied Macnaghten, but every time he posts I feel I'd have more chance understanding quantum mechanics.

    It's just possible that there may be documentary evidence in the form of letters etc retained by some branch of the family, but I'm not optimistic.

    I just don't know.
    Thanks Robert-yes, I'm the same but I can't help but wonder if Jonathon has something in that the answer to the uncle/nephew questions lies solely with Macnaghten and his motives. Or, dare I say it-he just made massive mistakes and leaps of faith while working from memory of the 1891 case.

    I don't know about you, Robert, but none of the members of THC's Cutbush family that I have ever been in contact with have ever heard any stories of illegitimacy that link Thomas Hayne Cutbush to Supt. Charles Henry Cutbush.
    As I found a while back-Thomas Watson Cutbush's illegitimate child was the subject of legal proceedings brought against him. That is a definite documented event. Perhaps something like that will turn up one day.

    Leave a comment:


  • Debra Arif
    replied
    Originally posted by A.P. Wolf View Post
    Debs, I'm not going to argue about the wisdom of confining Thomas, for he was an absolute lunatic, but I would argue the legal process of his confinement, and sentencing, at length.
    But there was no sentencing, AP.
    I would be interested in seeing your research evidence that Thomas was treated any differently, or unlawfully.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tom_Wescott
    replied
    Originally posted by A.P. Wolf View Post
    Debs, I'm not going to argue about the wisdom of confining Thomas, for he was an absolute lunatic, but I would argue the legal process of his confinement, and sentencing, at length.
    Same as Le Grand, another suspect the police felt thoroughly threatened by (and with much better and more obvious reason than Cutbush). Funny how these men got 'put away' as they did.

    Yours truly,

    Tom Wescott

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Linford
    replied
    Hi Debs

    It's very difficult. I know Jonathan has studied Macnaghten, but every time he posts I feel I'd have more chance understanding quantum mechanics.

    It's just possible that there may be documentary evidence in the form of letters etc retained by some branch of the family, but I'm not optimistic.

    I just don't know.

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Thank you Debs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Debra Arif
    replied
    Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
    A.P.

    I'm posting the links to the YouTube chats where Paul discusses Cutbush.

    Nine minute version : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WedHa9tX_uY


    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gCLCn_5VzAk
    2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=im2QJIBGRJk
    3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkcapyPAMgo
    4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNJ_xUVR47k

    I am removing the part underlined, A. P.
    Paul Begg never took credit for anything anyone else researched or found in regard to Cutbush.

    If someone was to claim the same about you nicking material, trust me, I'd be requiring that person to do the same thing as I did with you.
    I watched the clips when they were first posted and all Paul Begg and Richard Jones do is attempt to take the viewer along to experience looking at the Broadmoor files on Cutbush for the very first time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    A.P.

    I'm posting the links to the YouTube chats where Paul Begg & Richard Jones discuss Cutbush.

    Nine minute version : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WedHa9tX_uY


    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gCLCn_5VzAk
    2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=im2QJIBGRJk
    3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkcapyPAMgo
    4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNJ_xUVR47k

    Leave a comment:


  • AP Wolf
    replied
    Debs, I'm not going to argue about the wisdom of confining Thomas, for he was an absolute lunatic, but I would argue the legal process of his confinement, and sentencing, at length.

    Leave a comment:


  • Debra Arif
    replied
    Originally posted by A.P. Wolf View Post
    when I was attempting to explain the unreasonable confinement of Thomas - .
    Was it really unreasonable though? He was identified by women as someone who'd stabbed them-he was too insane to offer a plea- they put him in Broadmoor until a time when he either became sane enough to be able to understand and offer a plea and go on trial for the crimes or he became totally and hopelessly insane. Unfortunately for Thomas it was the latter event.

    Leave a comment:

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