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Vintage Mugshots Of American Criminals 1870's-1880's ( Inspector Byrnes)

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  • Vintage Mugshots Of American Criminals 1870's-1880's ( Inspector Byrnes)

    These are from Inspector Thomas Byrnes landmark book, Professional Criminals of America ( 1886)...


    Vintage Mugshots of American Criminals in the 1870's and 1880's: Part 1

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hb0h...nnel=Chubachus


    Vintage Mugshots of American Criminals in the 1870's and 1880's: Part 2

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1R16...nnel=Chubachus



    Vintage Mugshots of American Criminals from the 1870's and 1880's: Part 3

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdKH...nnel=Chubachus


    Vintage Mugshots of American Criminals from the 1870's and 1880's: Part 4

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUou...nnel=Chubachus
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  • #2
    Considering the tactics employed by Inspector Thomas Byrnes during the Carrie Brown murder and subsequent activities even during Ali's trial, it's no wonder Joe Lewis ( shown below), America's legendary con man, had it in for Byrnes....saying this :

    On December 20, 1888, Lewis was convicted of having "bunkoed" Baltimore businessman William J. Bansemer out of $5,000. He was sentenced to nine years in the Maryland State Penitentiary, but his term was reduced for good behavior, and he was released on June 20, 1896. Upon his release, he spoke against his imprisonment claiming he had been wrongly convicted. He further claimed that he could have been able to provide an alibi if had he been given the opportunity, but that he had been advised by his lawyer to plead guilty in order to avoid a maximum 15-year jail sentence. Lewis blamed the "frame up" on Inspector Byrnes, whom he claimed had a long-standing grudge against him and had used his influence to manipulate the police investigation and trial. He also made vague accusations regarding Byrnes involvement in police misconduct and corruption, but nothing came of the charges.
    Byrnes has a grudge against me which dates back some years. It was on account of some money matters. I had made some $15,000 in Chicago - but never mind that. If I was disposed to tell all I knew, the public would have less confidence in Inspector Byrnes. If he had received all that he deserves, he, and not I, would to-day be serving time. It was he who prevented me from engaging in legitimate business. I had been offered $25,000 to go into the bookmaking business but Byrnes stepped in and broke me up.
    -New York Times
    May 3, 1896-
    **************




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