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  • Chris G.
    replied
    Originally posted by jachim3926 View Post
    Hi Chris,
    Sorry,but you have missed out on a major prize, an evening with D Trump!

    'Man of foot' should have provided a clue. Artillery are nothing but long range snipers.

    My mob was Oxford & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, 43rd & 52nd of foot. Later to morph into the Green Jackets Brigade. Then ist Bn. Royal Green Jackets and finally 'The Rifles' as of 2002, I recall.

    During WW2 we were glider troops ( D Company) landing on the Orne River in Normandy at 5 minutes past midnight on D Day 6th of June. Later at Arnhem -operation Market Garden. Most of us are tasked with pushing up daisies nowadays, but those of us with a pulse shall prevail for the time being!
    Celer et Audax


    Merv
    Fascinating information, Merv. I love all that stuff. Those times were quite something although I am sure at times it was far too exciting.

    I have never served in the armed forces but in researching I have picked up much information about military matters. A number of reviewers of my books have pointed out that I have a good understanding of the military mindset and strategy. One critic comparing my book to another author's wrote that the other guy's book was too "touchy feely."

    Shame on me for not picking up on "of foot." In my writing about the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake, most of the Brits who here were "of foot" chappies!

    Best regards

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • jachim3926
    replied
    Hi Chris,
    Sorry,but you have missed out on a major prize, an evening with D Trump!

    'Man of foot' should have provided a clue. Artillery are nothing but long range snipers.

    My mob was Oxford & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, 43rd & 52nd of foot. Later to morph into the Green Jackets Brigade. Then ist Bn. Royal Green Jackets and finally 'The Rifles' as of 2002, I recall.

    During WW2 we were glider troops ( D Company) landing on the Orne River in Normandy at 5 minutes past midnight on D Day 6th of June. Later at Arnhem -operation Market Garden. Most of us are tasked with pushing up daisies nowadays, but those of us with a pulse shall prevail for the time being!
    Celer et Audax
    Merv

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris G.
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post

    Hi Chris :

    "Towards the end of World War I, in July 1918, at the age of 46, Taylor enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force as a private. After training for four and a half months at Fort Edward, Nova Scotia, Taylor sailed from Halifax on a troop transport carrying 500 Canadian soldiers.[11] They arrived at Hounslow Barracks, London on 2 December 1918.[11]
    Taylor was ultimately assigned to the Royal Army Service Corps of the Expeditionary Forces Canteen Service, stationed at Dunkirk, and promoted to the temporary grade of lieutenant on 15 January 1919.[12] At the end of April 1919, Taylor reached his final billet at Berguet, France, as Major Taylor, Company D, Royal Fusiliers.[13] Upon returning to Los Angeles on 14 May 1919, Taylor was honoured by the Motion Picture Directors Association with a formal banquet at the Los Angeles Athletic Club.[13]"

    (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Desmond_Taylor
    Hi Robert

    Thanks. That makes a lot more sense! I'm starting to get the idea we might win this bloody war after all!

    Cheers

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Linford
    replied
    Hi Chris :


    "Towards the end of World War I, in July 1918, at the age of 46, Taylor enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force as a private. After training for four and a half months at Fort Edward, Nova Scotia, Taylor sailed from Halifax on a troop transport carrying 500 Canadian soldiers.[11] They arrived at Hounslow Barracks, London on 2 December 1918.[11]
    Taylor was ultimately assigned to the Royal Army Service Corps of the Expeditionary Forces Canteen Service, stationed at Dunkirk, and promoted to the temporary grade of lieutenant on 15 January 1919.[12] At the end of April 1919, Taylor reached his final billet at Berguet, France, as Major Taylor, Company D, Royal Fusiliers.[13] Upon returning to Los Angeles on 14 May 1919, Taylor was honoured by the Motion Picture Directors Association with a formal banquet at the Los Angeles Athletic Club.[13]"


    (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Desmond_Taylor

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris G.
    replied
    Originally posted by jachim3926 View Post
    Quite so, Chris,
    To achieve this rate of promotion , he would either have been the CO's batman( for that read 'friend'), or had a rocket placed up his Khyber! Always remember the 11/11/ 1918! What say thou?

    Just an old soldier of foot that enlisted in the 'Pool ( Kings St.)in 1960- the rest of the 9 years were a blur!

    Stand at ease, Stand easy, Smoke if you have them!!
    Cheers,
    Merv

    PS If you can guess the Reg,t depicted on my avatar, there is a guaranteed place for you in the after life (or birth).
    Isn't that artillery, mate?

    Leave a comment:


  • jachim3926
    replied
    Quite so, Chris,
    To achieve this rate of promotion , he would either have been the CO's batman( for that read 'friend'), or had a rocket placed up his Khyber! Always remember the 11/11/ 1918! What say thou?

    Just an old soldier of foot that enlisted in the 'Pool ( Kings St.)in 1960- the rest of the 9 years were a blur!

    Stand at ease, Stand easy, Smoke if you have them!!
    Cheers,
    Merv

    PS If you can guess the Regt. depicted on my avatar, there is a guaranteed place for you in the after life (or birth).

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris G.
    replied
    Hi Anna

    Unless I am missing something, the tale of Taylor's military service makes no sense to me. The narrative appears screwy.

    If Taylor was in the British Army, why would he need go to Canada? The front was in the other direction!!!

    In World War II, some British servicemen were sent to North America (Canada or the United States) to train away from possible interference from German air attack.

    My cousin, Kenneth Matchett, OBE, comedian Billy Matchett's son (he received the OBE from HM the Queen for his service to music as GM of the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra) was sent to Texas to train as an RAF pilot. However, unlike WWII, in the Great War, Britain was not attacked by sophisticated bombers on a constant basis, albeit London and certain coastal cities did receive some damage, but that was more of a fleabite compared to the Blitz and German raids of WWII.

    Best regards

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris G.
    replied
    Originally posted by Anna Morris View Post
    Since some other questions are coming up I will supply several clips from Talorology. The clip critiquing Kirkpatrick's book is from T-65. The other three are from T-12. The Canadian angle comes in because one theory of the crime in 1922 was that a Canadian veteran had taken revenge on William Desmond Taylor who had been an officer. This has never worked out. . .

    This means that William Desmond Taylor was not in battle in the First World War. The war was over when he got to Europe.

    At least as consolation, he got nearer tothe front than did writer F. Scott Fitzgerald who never got further than training camp in Alabama, where he met his future wife Zelda.

    The reality that Taylor was never in battle during World War I makes it highly unlikely that he was "fragged" by a fellow vet, a story that must be consigned to the pile labeled "bunkum."

    Best regards

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Linford
    replied
    Ha, yes Chris, and there again :


    "Ask not what your plum tree can do for you. Ask what you can do for your plum tree."

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris G.
    replied
    Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
    Was 'Canteen' the precursor of the NAAFI?
    Yes that could be, Gary. At least let that be our working assumption.

    Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
    I was looking down the list of names of the regiments on the left and then I realized when I saw the designation "Canteens" that Taylor worked in food service not in a line regiment. That is, he may have been at the front but not in a fighting capacity.

    I'm not sure about that, Chris. He may have fired custard, apple crumble, jelly and cheesecake into the German lines - in other words, dessertion in the face of the enemy.
    Hi Robert

    Let us never forget the immortal nay! courageous words of U.S. President John F. Kennedy in the face of the oppressive Communist (ie, Russian-/Moscow-directed) occupation of East Berlin.

    "Ich bin ein Berliner!" JFK declared on June 26, 1963 during his speech in West Berlin. Which all German-speaking people immediately recognized as the President proclaiming, "I am a jelly doughnut!"*

    Best regards

    Chris

    * Our British friends would say "I am a jam doughnut." Hmmm. For whether this is an urban legend see https://tinyurl.com/ybs4o5gb

    Leave a comment:


  • Anna Morris
    replied
    Since some other questions are coming up I will supply several clips from Talorology. The clip critiquing Kirkpatrick's book is from T-65. The other three are from T-12. The Canadian angle comes in because one theory of the crime in 1922 was that a Canadian veteran had taken revenge on William Desmond Taylor who had been an officer. This has never worked out.
    Attached Files

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Was 'Canteen' the precursor of the NAAFI?

    Leave a comment:


  • Anna Morris
    replied
    William Desmond Taylor was an actor and film director before joining the army. He was in charge of some sort of entertainment in the army as I recall. Bruce Long has Taylor's diary or something similar from that time.

    Chris: I will check out the video a bit later. Sounds interesting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Linford
    replied
    I was looking down the list of names of the regiments on the left and then I realized when I saw the designation "Canteens" that Taylor worked in food service not in a line regiment. That is, he may have been at the front but not in a fighting capacity.

    I'm not sure about that, Chris. He may have fired custard, apple crumble, jelly and cheesecake into the German lines - in other words, dessertion in the face of the enemy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris G.
    replied
    Originally posted by Anna Morris View Post
    I was able to clip the original document plus the questions. This pertains to William Desmond Taylor, the silent film era director who was mysteriously murdered in early February, 1922. He was in the English military toward the end of WWI.

    (The Taylor murder is still unsolved. Bruce Long who asks the questions here, started Taylorology, amassing information about the case. My whole internet career started with Taylorology.)

    Another member replied to the questions, describing U.S. military procedures. I do not know if they are the same. Any information is greatly appreciated.

    Hi again Amanda

    I was looking down the list of names of the regiments on the left and then I realized when I saw the designation "Canteens" that Taylor worked in food service not in a line regiment. That is, he may have been at the front but not in a fighting capacity.

    Cheers

    Chris

    P.S., Billy Matchett (1889-1974), my grand uncle on my mother's side and my grandad's elder brother, was a music hall comedian in civilian life. During World War I, Billy was in the trenches on the Western Front serving in the Liverpool Scottish Regiment. Actor Basil Rathbone was one of his officers.



    Billy Matchett postcard signed to Frank Sparke, 1915

    Leave a comment:

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