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The Ripper's Haunts ( Hawley, 2016, Sunbury Press)

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  • The Ripper's Haunts ( Hawley, 2016, Sunbury Press)



    Hidden from history for over a century, the name of Scotland Yard's key suspect in the mysterious Jack the Ripper murders was rediscovered in 1993. He was arrested, jumped bail, sneaked out of England--and then the murders stopped. Tracing his footsteps through Victorian London has revealed haunting finds. A macabre wax museum operated just yards away from the first vicious attack, in which the proprietor callously showcased explicit wax models of the fiend's victims, presented to the public just hours after each untimely death. A clandestine police investigation was being quietly pursued, based upon a Jekyll-Hyde theory that the killer was harvesting female organs in his quest to create an elixir of life. Surprisingly, actor-producer Richard Mansfield's "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" was showing at the famous Lyceum Theatre in London during the 1888 Autumn of terror; incredibly, the employees of the theater were members of an organization that was also in search of the precious elixir. Recent studies on the Jack the Ripper murders performed by experts in forensic science, sociology, and criminal profiling support the conclusion that the person linked to these graphic killings would be someone interested in the three types of anatomical organs taken from the victims; someone like this very suspect.

    (The suspect is Francis Tumblety....for newcomers*- HB)
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  • #2
    American link for Amazon.com :

    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...per%27s+haunts

    British link for Amazon.co.UK


    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rippers-Haun...ack+the+ripper
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    • #3
      Anyone got this and can post a review? Looks quite interesting.

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      • #4
        It was reviewed in the last issue of Ripperologist.

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        • #5
          Cheers Paul.
          Didn't read the full review but have heard good things about the book & also the author. Note sure at all about Franco as JTR, but did enjoy Evans & Gainey. I haven't read Riordan. I'll post my thoughts on here when I've finished this book.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Stephen Collyer View Post
            Cheers Paul.
            Didn't read the full review but have heard good things about the book & also the author. Note sure at all about Franco as JTR, but did enjoy Evans & Gainey. I haven't read Riordan. I'll post my thoughts on here when I've finished this book.
            I think Tumblety is an interest character in his own right, so Michael Hawley's book adds quite a bit of interesting detail about his life and career. Riordan's book is excellent too, but far too expensive. Evans and Gainey are good, but we know so much more about Tumblety since they wrote and I don't think it's likely that Tumblety was the Ripper or the Batty Street lodger. As said, an interesting figure nonetheless.

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            • #7
              Well it's fascinating work on probably just about the most interesting character surrounding the Whitechapel murders.

              One thing sprang into my mind whilst reading about the misogyny evidently exhibited by our man was it is strange that he should choose a trade in which around half the people he would likely meet & presumably be required to physically examine would be female. Perhaps his hatred of women merely extended to his avoiding having to socialise with them? There seems to be no proof that he had any issues in treating women & taking their money from them.
              Back in the mid to late 1800's there must have been plenty of roles which an entrepreneur like FT could have created for himself in order to avoid having to meet with female clients on a daily basis.
              Perhaps dealing with women wasn't quite as horrendous a prospect for Tumblety as we are led to believe?

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              • #8
                Tumblety was called a "woman hater" and this has been taken to mean that he literally hated women and wanted to kill them. This is a misconception.

                The term "woman hater" was used for years to mean homosexual. This usage goes back to at least the late 1600's, early 1700's (a song titled The Women-Haters Lamentation, about a group of men arrested for homosexual activities, dates from 1707).

                There is also the connotation of a "woman hater" being a confirmed bachelor, although life long confirmed bachelors in Victorian times might just have been closeted Gays, who knows. Grover Cleveland was described in newspapers as being a "woman hater," both when he was Governor of New York and President, since he was unmarried (he eventually did marry and was the only President married in the Whitehouse). There is no evidence, or even belief, that he literally hated women.

                Since Tumblety actually was an homosexual the "woman hater" tag is not hard to understand (unless, of course, you look at everything through subjective "Ripper suspect" lenses).

                Wolf.

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                • #9
                  I assume you haven't got the book then, as Hawley devotes an entire 15 page chapter to Tumblety the woman hater.

                  He argues the point very well that Tumblety, whilst also a homosexual, had a fairly well-known dislike of being in the company of women & was a misogynist. Hawley quotes various sources & as I say, his argument is persuasive - hence my previous question.

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                  • #10
                    Hi Stephen.

                    Actually I do own a copy of the book but I haven't bothered to read it yet. I have, however, glanced through it and read sections of it. Much of what Mike claims, from what I've read so far, is, to be kind, less than convincing and much of it doesn't stand up to real scrutiny. The book seems to be based on years of posts on Casebook, some articles he wrote, and the works of people like R.J. Palmer, none of which is an objective look at Tumblety as a suspect.

                    Wolf.

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                    • #11
                      Stephen:

                      "He argues the point very well that Tumblety, whilst also a homosexual, had a fairly well-known dislike of being in the company of women & was a misogynist. Hawley quotes various sources & as I say, his argument is persuasive - hence my previous question."

                      Over half of Tumblety's clientele were females. Did a single one of them ever say anything publicly about having the perception that he disliked them as patients or acquaintances because they were women ?
                      When he went to the New York World for the January 1889 interview, he whipped out a poem written by a woman in his honor.
                      His landlord in New York described him as being pleasant. The landlord was a lady.
                      Talking the talk ain't walking the walk. There's nothing in Tumblety's life resume that suggests he did anything other than mouth aspersions towards women.
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                      • #12
                        Hi Stephen.

                        I've glanced through part of Hawley's chapter 8 (Tumblety the Woman Hater) and found it sadly typical of Hawley's writing.

                        He doesn't here offer Chief Inspector Littlechild's full quote on Tumblety, he characteristically edits out that part which goes against his claims, so that Littlechild's mention of Tumblety's homosexuality conveniently disappears. A little later in the chapter this allows him to draw false conclusions about Littlechild's meaning. What Littlechild wrote was that "Although a 'Sycopathia Sexualis' subject he was not known as a 'Sadist' (which the murderer unquestionably was) but his feelings toward women were remarkable and bitter in the extreme, a fact on record."

                        So Littlechild does suggest that although Tumblety was a homosexual he wasn't the Ripper who, without question, was a sadist which Tumblety, Littlechild states, was not. Also, Littlechild says that Tumblety's feelings toward women were remarkable and bitter in the extreme and that this was a "fact on record." As Howard has pointed out, there is no record of Tumblety having extremely bitter feelings against women - there was, however, a record of Tumblety's homosexual activities.

                        Hawley then offers several snippets from various newspapers to back up his dubious claims. Interestingly one of those snippets, from William Pinkerton, is cherry picked from a larger article (the Chicago Daily Inter Ocean, 20 November, 1888) in which Pinkerton speaks of Tumblety's homosexuality. When asked by the reporter if Pinkerton thinks that Tumblety could be the Ripper, and was he insane, Pinkerton states that "Yes, I do. I think a man guilty of such practices as those I have referred to (homosexuality) must be insane; and Dr. Hammond – Surgeon General Hammond – some time ago, when asked as to whether or not he thought that the Whitechapel murderer was an insane man, said that when the murderer of those women was discovered he would undoubtedly be found to be a woman-hater and a man guilty of the same practices which I have described (homosexuality), and Twombley, or Tumblety, as being guilty of (homosexuality), and that such men were crazy and as likely as not to murder women."

                        So one of the very articles Hawley uses to support his claims actually disproves them: that Tumblety's homosexuality was seen as a reason for suspecting him of being the Ripper and the term "woman-hater" was used to describe his homosexuality. The longer Pinkerton article shows that, sadly, both were true.

                        Hawley then goes on to point out that the term "woman-hater" also meant a misogynist, which is perfectly true, and that this is what people meant when they used the term to describe Tumblety. He then gives some examples of "woman-hater" used to describe misogyny: misogynist "woman-haters" who were opposed to women's rights, a play about a gigolo who has affairs with several women titled The Woman-Hater. The problem here is that none of his examples relate in any way to Tumblety's known character. Considering the fact that the term "woman-hater" was used to describe homosexuals and that Tumblety was a homosexual and that this fact seems to have been widely known based on newspaper articles that mention this fact, this is laughable stuff.

                        Hawley can't just make these facts go away, although he tries very hard to obscure them to the unwary reader.

                        Wolf.

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                        • #13
                          So when Littlechild wrote: "...but his feelings towards women were remarkable and bitter in the extreme, a fact on record." are you saying he was mistaken?
                          Surely he could have just written "he was a woman-hater, a fact on record" if he was insinuating FT was gay.
                          What you seem to be suggesting is that Littlechild was either simply incorrect or that he over-elaborated for no reason.
                          Either way, it makes no sense to me that Littlechild is simply referring to Tumblety as being a homosexual using the wording he did.

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                          • #14
                            What you seem to be suggesting is that Littlechild was either simply incorrect or that he over-elaborated for no reason.
                            Either way, it makes no sense to me that Littlechild is simply referring to Tumblety as being a homosexual using the wording he did.

                            -Stephen Collyer-

                            Speaking for myself, if someone wants to read more into the Tumblety story than what I, personally, think is there, its obviously not my business, nor intention to make anyone think the way I do. IMHO, Tumblety isn't a suspect at this point in time.

                            This has been mentioned before, either in this way or in another, but Littlechild's comments were provided within a private communication. In personal, private communications such as letter writing, the slight or severe emphasis is common.

                            Therefore, speaking for myself, Littlechild's remarks are not out of whack, but within reason. He is simply stating that Tumblety was a homosexual with the emphasis on 'remarkable and bitter to the extreme' a matter of over-emphasis. The 'fact on record', stated by Littlechild, more than likely, refers to what men or boys in England told the police about his disdain for women. The same 'fact on record' as it applies to Tumblety in America may be found in the comments made by American males when queried about him.

                            The day anyone provides ONE example of the most well publicized suspect ( Sickert excluded ) even being discourteous to a woman or failing that, one example of a woman on either continent stating anything which indicates Tumblety was even so much as rude to them....then, maybe I'd think there was an outside chance he was more than a man who distanced himself sexually from women.
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                            • #15
                              Stephen:

                              One other thing....let's take Littlechild's remark in the manner that Tumblety theorists wish we would :


                              "...but his feelings towards women were remarkable and bitter in the extreme, a fact on record."....as if he displayed aggressiveness towards women.

                              And what is the record ? Not a single known example of Tumblety even being irritable in the presence of a woman.....although his practice, which garnered him a fortune, relied on a high number of women.

                              It ought to be easy for the Tumblety theorists to find one since Tumblety is like horseshit ( all over the place and noticeable) in American papers from 1860 to 1903.
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