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The Escape Of Jack The Ripper ( Hainsworth & Agius, 2020)

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  • Paul Butler
    replied
    It's a fiver off on UK Amazon right now. I just bought the kindle edition and will be starting it tonight. Really looking forward to it. The last one was good.

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  • Joe Chetcuti
    replied
    The mailman finally figured out where I live, and he delivered the book to me yesterday. This weekend I will begin reading the chapters.

    Congratulations to both Jonathan and Christine. They devoted a lot of time and research into this work. It must be a good feeling to see your final product become available to the public.

    I already took a look at the photo gallery section in the middle of the book. Very nicely done. Both Stewart and Christine's daughter Sarah contributed nicely to these picture pages. It was well presented. That previously unpublished photograph of Druitt with his collegiate friends is probably the kingpin of them all.

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Review from Katherine Ramsland.....she gives the book significant praise.

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/b...aF7swhIKFMRrCs

    Ripper Suspects Never Die

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  • Paul
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Butler View Post
    Did you get an advance copy Paul? Amazon still says March 15th.

    Sorry, Paul. I completely missed your post. Yes, I received an advance review copy. It's a tough book to review too. There's an awful lot of 'we thing', 'we believe', and so on, but the authors are trying to piece together a ton of disparate information. The whole mixture isn't helped by the authors' theory that Macnaghten and Sims were running a campaign to obscure the truth.

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  • Howard Brown
    replied

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Compiled from years of meticulous research, The Escape of Jack the Ripper moves from the suffering of impoverished Whitechapel to genteel London society, picturesque Dorset, the Inner Temple and the anonymity of the private asylums of France and England
    -Jon Hainsworth-



    Looking through articles from 1907 tonight, I came across this :

    George Sims was a Druitt man. Since that's the case, this line referring to Jack The Ripper being released from an asylum would be about Druitt.

    The Referee
    Mustard & Cress Column, Page 11
    October 13, 1907
    ***************

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  • Paul Butler
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul View Post
    I don't know what's 'salacious' about it. Maybe I haven't got to that bit yet. It might be because of other distractions, but I'm finding it rather tough going. Good, but tough going.
    Did you get an advance copy Paul? Amazon still says March 15th.

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  • Paul
    replied
    Originally posted by Cogidubnus View Post
    The Express describes the book as a "salacious autobiography" - you heard it here first, Daily Express claims Jonathan was JtR...

    I don't know what's 'salacious' about it. Maybe I haven't got to that bit yet. It might be because of other distractions, but I'm finding it rather tough going. Good, but tough going.

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Jon provided a new blurb for the upcoming book :

    For nearly 100 years, the question has repeatedly been asked: who was 'Jack the Ripper'? The real question that should be answered, however, is why? Why were five poor, defenceless women savagely murdered in the slums of Whitechapel in the autumn of 1888?

    Credible Victorian sources including an Old Etonian police chief (Sir Melville Macnaghten), a famous writer on true crime (George R. Sims), a Conservative MP (Henry Farquharson) and, most incriminatingly, members of the killer's own family knew that 'Jack the Ripper' was Montague John Druitt. He escaped earthly justice by drowning himself in the Thames. This book answers the question of why in 1888 Druitt, a barrister, part-time teacher and first-class cricketer, killed and mutilated women driven into prostitution through social neglect.

    Compiled from years of meticulous research, The Escape of Jack the Ripper moves from the suffering of impoverished Whitechapel to genteel London society, picturesque Dorset, the Inner Temple and the anonymity of the private asylums of France and England. The struggle of Druitt's desperate, respectable family to cover up for their dead Montie, whilst preventing any innocent person being hanged for his crimes, is told here. In the Edwardian era, Sir Melville and G. R. Sims ensured that the public understood that the long-deceased Whitechapel fiend was neither poor nor an immigrant, but rather a product of the British establishment.

    The photographs include the newly discovered last known image of Druitt.

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  • Paul Butler
    replied
    Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post
    Is this available in the states yet?
    It certainly isn't available on UK Amazon yet. I'm looking forward to it. Jonathan's last one was a good, if pricey, read.

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  • Abby Normal
    replied
    Is this available in the states yet?

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  • Cogidubnus
    replied
    I wonder which is worse?

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  • Robert Linford
    replied
    Or maybe the book was ghost-written by Druitt.

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  • Cogidubnus
    replied
    The Express describes the book as a "salacious autobiography" - you heard it here first, Daily Express claims Jonathan was JtR...

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Linford
    replied
    https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/12...ler-prostitute

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