Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Escape Of Jack The Ripper ( Hainsworth & Agius, 2020)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #76
    from the amazon link in the OP:
    Hardcover: 70000 pages
    Now that might be a lotta info!

    I never bought JH's first book, because every time I see it it is over £30. I'm cautious about spending that kinda money.
    I'll consider seventy thousand pages for twenty quid though!

    Comment


    • #77
      Yo, Lem !

      You have a book review for this month, my friend ?

      Comment


      • #78
        Or is there something wrong with Amazon? I remember looking for the Sheldens' books and the price being something like $2500.00. (A higher number in English pounds.) I figured it was a misprint and later figured the page must have been out of date and in need of removal or re-booting.
        The wickedness of the world is the dream of the plague.~~Voynich Manuscript

        Comment


        • #79
          Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
          Yo, Lem !

          You have a book review for this month, my friend ?
          Not just yet sir! I try to vary my reading, and have just started a 700 page novel by stephen king (sleeping beauties). However, very likely a JtR book will follow that.

          Comment


          • #80

            Comment


            • #81
              The Express describes the book as a "salacious autobiography" - you heard it here first, Daily Express claims Jonathan was JtR...

              Comment


              • #82
                Or maybe the book was ghost-written by Druitt.

                Comment


                • #83
                  I wonder which is worse?

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Is this available in the states yet?

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post
                      Is this available in the states yet?
                      It certainly isn't available on UK Amazon yet. I'm looking forward to it. Jonathan's last one was a good, if pricey, read.

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        Jon provided a new blurb for the upcoming book :

                        For nearly 100 years, the question has repeatedly been asked: who was 'Jack the Ripper'? The real question that should be answered, however, is why? Why were five poor, defenceless women savagely murdered in the slums of Whitechapel in the autumn of 1888?

                        Credible Victorian sources including an Old Etonian police chief (Sir Melville Macnaghten), a famous writer on true crime (George R. Sims), a Conservative MP (Henry Farquharson) and, most incriminatingly, members of the killer's own family knew that 'Jack the Ripper' was Montague John Druitt. He escaped earthly justice by drowning himself in the Thames. This book answers the question of why in 1888 Druitt, a barrister, part-time teacher and first-class cricketer, killed and mutilated women driven into prostitution through social neglect.

                        Compiled from years of meticulous research, The Escape of Jack the Ripper moves from the suffering of impoverished Whitechapel to genteel London society, picturesque Dorset, the Inner Temple and the anonymity of the private asylums of France and England. The struggle of Druitt's desperate, respectable family to cover up for their dead Montie, whilst preventing any innocent person being hanged for his crimes, is told here. In the Edwardian era, Sir Melville and G. R. Sims ensured that the public understood that the long-deceased Whitechapel fiend was neither poor nor an immigrant, but rather a product of the British establishment.

                        The photographs include the newly discovered last known image of Druitt.

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Originally posted by Cogidubnus View Post
                          The Express describes the book as a "salacious autobiography" - you heard it here first, Daily Express claims Jonathan was JtR...

                          I don't know what's 'salacious' about it. Maybe I haven't got to that bit yet. It might be because of other distractions, but I'm finding it rather tough going. Good, but tough going.

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Originally posted by Paul View Post
                            I don't know what's 'salacious' about it. Maybe I haven't got to that bit yet. It might be because of other distractions, but I'm finding it rather tough going. Good, but tough going.
                            Did you get an advance copy Paul? Amazon still says March 15th.

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              Compiled from years of meticulous research, The Escape of Jack the Ripper moves from the suffering of impoverished Whitechapel to genteel London society, picturesque Dorset, the Inner Temple and the anonymity of the private asylums of France and England
                              -Jon Hainsworth-



                              Looking through articles from 1907 tonight, I came across this :

                              George Sims was a Druitt man. Since that's the case, this line referring to Jack The Ripper being released from an asylum would be about Druitt.

                              The Referee
                              Mustard & Cress Column, Page 11
                              October 13, 1907
                              ***************

                              Comment


                              • #90

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X