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The Escape Of Jack The Ripper ( Hainsworth & Agius, 2020)

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  • Chris Phillips
    replied
    Here's a positive review of the book by John Rimmer on the Magonia Review website:
    http://pelicanist.blogspot.com/2020/...ng-ripper.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Joe Chetcuti
    replied
    The authors speak of an asylum near Paris that they suspect was the location where the patient from England may have been taken to. The asylum had printed an advertising pamphlet, and some of its contents were shared on the top of page 136 of Jonathan and Christine's book.

    The two doctors who founded the French asylum had spent time in England and their pamphlet explained that they have several English patients in their establishment and that they understand the peculiar management they require.

    While it's cool to publicly talk about Jonathan and Christine's hard work, to be fair to them, their book should really be read in its entirety to get a complete picture of what they are saying.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Butler
    replied
    Absolutely. "Gone abroad" can have quite a wide meaning, and could be used euphemistically by anyone not wanting to be too specific.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joe Chetcuti
    replied
    What Paul was referring to can be found on page 138 of the book. It reads:

    "...it has always puzzled researchers as to why Montague Druitt's sporting club ended his membership on 21 December 1888 for "having gone abroad". The cryptic wording of the sporting club's minutes does make sense if his fellow gentlemen had been informed he had travelled to a foreign sanatorium for urgent treatment (and for an indefinite period)."

    If Montague was really taken to the French asylum, and his sporting club was told he has gone abroad for medical treatment, then it can be assumed that the Druitt family became more discreet about the situation as time went on.

    If this were the actual case, then it can be said that the Druitt family started out by openly informing the sporting club of Montague's travel plans, but when the travel plans went into effect, they changed their minds and applied an alias name to Montague.

    Leave a comment:


  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Chris:

    Thanks for that info on Charles Prideaux. I'm familiar with the Camp case but didn't know about the accused attorney.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Phillips
    replied
    Originally posted by Simon Wood View Post
    In the Butte [Montana] Weekly Miner, 2nd December 1897, a story appeared entitled “Skeletons in the Closet,” telling of the “Society of Reformers,” a sort of self-help group for “gentlemen of birth and of breeding” who had fallen victim to blackmail. The article then went on to detail how certain noble families disposed of their embarrassing black sheep by having them consigned, often without trial, to Broadmoor asylum for the criminal insane, “there to be detained according to what is styled in official phraseology ‘during Her Majesty’s pleasure.’
    It's quite a long story, so here's the gist of it—

    "Behind the walls of [Broadmoor] are hidden many of the grandest names of the United Kingdom, and terrible secrets affecting old houses of the nobility, which are known to few save the officials of the home department in London, and perhaps to some of the superior officers of the London police.”

    “Incidentally it may be mentioned that it was at Broadmoor that the blue-blooded perpetrator of the Whitechapel murders is now admitted by the authorities to have breathed his last and it is likewise to Broadmoor that will be consigned without trial the well-born and hitherto successful member of the bar whose homicidal mania has now been ascertained by the police to have led him to perpetrate the mysterious murder of Miss Camp, on the Suburban London railroad last spring, and likewise to put to death in an equally unaccountable fashion a young woman whose body was found some six weeks later at Windsor. It is probable that his true name will be kept from the public precisely in the same way as that of the author of the ‘Jack the Ripper’ series of murders.”

    There's a Casebook thread on the murder of Elizabeth Camp, including the likely identification of the barrister suspected of her murder, Charles Augustin Prideaux:
    https://forum.casebook.org/forum/rip...beth-camp-1897

    Leave a comment:


  • Cogidubnus
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris Phillips View Post
    Yes, I have read that book. I'm sure the system was abused, but I don't remember any cases of people being committed under a false name. Of course, I may be wrong.
    I don't believe the book itemises any cases of imprisonment under a false name, but thereagain, a patient's insistence on a different identity would just as likely be seen as further evidence of lunacy...so how would we know at this distance in time? And don't forget we only hear about the ones who got away, (albeit sometimes after several years and great cost).

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Linford
    replied
    Thanks Dave.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cogidubnus
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert Linford View Post
    Hi Dave


    Did that include men as well as women, and in particular young or middle-aged men?
    The very first case investigated concerned a young chap called Edward Davies who was falsely committed by his own mother, the second John Perceval, again put away by family members...and so it goes on...and of course we only get to hear about the ones who succeeded eventually in getting out!

    Leave a comment:


  • Simon Wood
    replied
    In the Butte [Montana] Weekly Miner, 2nd December 1897, a story appeared entitled “Skeletons in the Closet,” telling of the “Society of Reformers,” a sort of self-help group for “gentlemen of birth and of breeding” who had fallen victim to blackmail. The article then went on to detail how certain noble families disposed of their embarrassing black sheep by having them consigned, often without trial, to Broadmoor asylum for the criminal insane, “there to be detained according to what is styled in official phraseology ‘during Her Majesty’s pleasure.’
    It's quite a long story, so here's the gist of it—

    "Behind the walls of [Broadmoor] are hidden many of the grandest names of the United Kingdom, and terrible secrets affecting old houses of the nobility, which are known to few save the officials of the home department in London, and perhaps to some of the superior officers of the London police.”

    “Incidentally it may be mentioned that it was at Broadmoor that the blue-blooded perpetrator of the Whitechapel murders is now admitted by the authorities to have breathed his last and it is likewise to Broadmoor that will be consigned without trial the well-born and hitherto successful member of the bar whose homicidal mania has now been ascertained by the police to have led him to perpetrate the mysterious murder of Miss Camp, on the Suburban London railroad last spring, and likewise to put to death in an equally unaccountable fashion a young woman whose body was found some six weeks later at Windsor. It is probable that his true name will be kept from the public precisely in the same way as that of the author of the ‘Jack the Ripper’ series of murders.”

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Phillips
    replied
    Originally posted by Cogidubnus View Post
    Have you ever read "Inconvenient People" by Sarah Wise? There are tales in there that'd make your hair curl...the point being, asylums were seen by some as convenient places to "disappear" inconvenient people...especially when reputation and/or money were at stake.

    Yes, I have read that book. I'm sure the system was abused, but I don't remember any cases of people being committed under a false name. Of course, I may be wrong.

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Linford
    replied
    Hi Dave


    Did that include men as well as women, and in particular young or middle-aged men?

    Leave a comment:


  • Cogidubnus
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris Phillips View Post
    I must admit I'm still sceptical about how easy it would have been to confine someone to an asylum under a false name, whether in England or France.
    Have you ever read "Inconvenient People" by Sarah Wise? There are tales in there that'd make your hair curl...the point being, asylums were seen by some as convenient places to "disappear" inconvenient people...especially when reputation and/or money were at stake.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Butler
    replied
    Sending a mad relative to a French asylum makes perfect sense to me. Out of sight and out of mind. Wasn't Montie supposed to have "gone abroad"?

    Leave a comment:


  • Trevor Marriott
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris Phillips View Post
    I must admit I'm still sceptical about how easy it would have been to confine someone to an asylum under a false name, whether in England or France.
    In Victorian times I would suggest anything would have been possible with enough money. But this scenario as has been described from the book as it stands does not stand up to close scrutiny.

    www.trevormarriott.co.uk

    Leave a comment:

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