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Jacob The Ripper (T. & N. I'anson)

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  • #16
    Thanks Tracy and many congratulations to you and Neil, how exciting! Well done. I'll be downloading it onto Kindle in the next few days.

    Cheers,
    Adam.

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    • #17
      Not sure if the book is still available ( we have copy 85 of 100 ).....but if it is, it is an absolute goldmine of information on Jacob Levy and virtually everything related to him.

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      • #18
        Hi guys. Thanks for the kind words and we Hope you all enjoy!!

        Thanks How, glad you're impressed, we're really pleased with it oursleves��
        The hardback book was limited edition of 100 copies but it can be bought in paperback and on Kindle.

        Tracy
        If you're going to be two-faced at least make one of them pretty.

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        • #19
          Thanks for that, Tracy....it was probably already mentioned, but I didn't recall whether it was published in limited edition.

          You should be proud, lady. XXX

          P.S. Another book out of Mango which is bound very well. Woody is a modern day Gutenberg over there....
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          • #20
            Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
            Not sure if the book is still available ( we have copy 85 of 100 ).....but if it is, it is an absolute goldmine of information on Jacob Levy and virtually everything related to him.

            I agree. The research on Jacob Levy is excellent, very thorough!
            Well done Tracy and Neil. xx

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Debra Arif View Post
              I agree. The research on Jacob Levy is excellent, very thorough!
              Well done Tracy and Neil. xx

              Indeed. All you ever wanted to know about Jacob Levy. And then some.... And a nice edition too.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
                Thanks for that, Tracy....it was probably already mentioned, but I didn't recall whether it was published in limited edition.

                You should be proud, lady. XXX

                P.S. Another book out of Mango which is bound very well. Woody is a modern day Gutenberg over there....
                I think I got number 6! Really looking forward to it.
                On the bit in bold, the quality of book, binding, paper etc in all the mango books I have bought is absolutely top notch. Such exemplary quality pretty much means whenever there is a new book alert from Adam, I'm a gonna be shopping. Phenomenally good.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post



                  New book announcement

                  JACOB THE RIPPER:
                  THE CASE AGAINST JACOB LEVY
                  By Neil and Tracy I’Anson

                  Pre-order now to receive a limited edition hardback copy, individually numbered and signed by the authors:

                  http://mangobooks.co.uk/book.php?b=53

                  When playing the game of Name the Ripper, many authors start with a suspect and attempt to make them fit the facts; some can't even be proved to be in London at the time of the murders.

                  What is required is an ordinary man local to the East End; a man who suffered mental illness, and was known to prowl the streets at night. A man with vast experience of wielding a knife in his place of work, and who had family ties to Wentworth Model Dwellings, where the only clue ever left by the killer - a bloodied portion of apron - was discovered. A man whose admission to a lunatic asylum coincided with the cessation of the Whitechapel murders.

                  A man like Jacob Levy.

                  Jacob Levy came to the attention of researchers Neil and Tracy I'Anson many years ago. Their continuing research has brought new evidence to light; sifting through hundreds, if not thousands, of pages of information from various research facilities they came across new undiscovered facts that strengthened their theory and helped piece together the life of Jacob Levy, including the startling fact that their suspect was a first cousin of Joseph Hyam Levy, the witness at Mitre Square who appeared to be shocked when spotting a man with a woman who was later identified as victim Catherine Eddowes; The Evening News reported that "Mr Levy is absolutely obstinate and refuses to give the slightest information and he leaves one to infer that he knows something but that he is afraid to be called on the inquest."

                  JACOB THE RIPPER goes some way to explaining the movements of the Whitechapel murderer, the graffiti at Goulston Street, the actions of the police, the ‘Lipski’ link, and ultimately what happened to the murderer.

                  To be published late July 2020.

                  Pre-order now to receive a limited edition hardback copy, individually numbered and signed by the authors:

                  http://mangobooks.co.uk/book.php?b=53
                  congrats to the Iansons on their book!

                  how solid is the jacob/Joseph levy cousin evidence?
                  were they really cousins and what is the evidence that they were?
                  has anyone done any follow up research to confirm and what is the general consensus on this?

                  the reason i ask is that ive always considered jacob levy, while an intriguing character, not really a valid suspect. IMHO the first hurdle for anyone positing a (new) suspect is they have show that they have some kind of connection to the case.

                  establishing they were, in fact, cousins would do that for me, especially in light of that cryptic line in the Evening News.

                  so, were they really cousins or not?

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                  • #24
                    The evidence that they were cousins is presented in their article "Jacob the Ripper?" In Ripperologist 124 (February 2012). It's free.

                    Why, oh why, can't people read this journal?

                    So many of their questions would be answered if only they would read the words of investigators and researchers instead of reading message boards all the time.

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                    • #25
                      Yes. The mass of genealogical information in the book about the different branches of the Levy family (much of it in the form of an appendix) has to be seen to be believed.

                      But to put in a nutshell the evidence found by the authors proving the relationship between the suspect and the witness:
                      (1) The witness's father Hyam and the suspect's father Joseph are both described as the sons of Isaac Levy at their marriages.
                      (2) An Isaac Levy was a butcher at 36 Petticoat Lane/Middlesex Street in 1822 according to a directory.
                      (3) Hyam Levy was a butcher at that address by 1841 and his son the witness lived there as a child.
                      (4) After the death of Hyam in 1872, his widow continued the business at that address initially, but by 1886 Jacob Levy the suspect was running his butcher's business there.

                      That is only the bare bones, and there is much more in-depth information in the book.

                      There is also a tremendous amount of information about the victims, and there is a generous preview of the opening chapters on Amazon (covering nearly 20% of the main text).

                      Of course there is also an outline of the evidence suggesting Jacob Levy might have been the Ripper, including new information which (I believe) hasn't appeared before.

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                      • #26
                        I thought the observations on Goulston Street, the timeline and geography of which I've always found puzzling, were interesting too, permitting of a number of feasible explanations.

                        I very much enjoyed the Ripperologist article, and this book even more...it's simply packed with painstaking and very original research...Against a grim old background, 2020 is proving to be very good on the book front.

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                        • #27
                          Hi Neil and Tracy,

                          An accurate telling of the victims' lives, coupled with an unsurpassed biography of Jacob Levy.

                          Most suspect based books are not worth a second look, or, indeed a first look. But this book is!

                          Good luck!

                          My best wishes,

                          Sean.

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                          • #28
                            Congratulations to Neil and Tracy. This is an excellent and honest book and Levy is an interesting suspect. No codes or cyphers or anagrams or raving Royals or prowling painters or fiendish Freemasons just excellent research. I hope that you keep on digging.
                            Regards

                            Michael🔎


                            " When you eliminate the impossible whatever remains no matter how improbable......is probably a little bit boring "

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                            • #29
                              I'm surprised that there hasn't been more discussion of the contents of the book - particularly the new information about Jacob Levy.

                              One interesting revelation is that - as well as having a family connection with the Mitre Square witness, Joseph Hyam Levy - Jacob Levy had even closer family connections with Wentworth Model Dwellings. In May 1888, his mother Caroline had died at 198 Wentworth Buildings and his brother (who was the informant when her death was registered) was living at 214 Wentworth Buildings.

                              The layout can be seen in a Goad plan posted to Casebook by Rob Clack:
                              https://forum.casebook.org/forum/rip...1201#post81201

                              These two addresses were directly behind the block where the graffito and apron were found. That raises the question of whether that block had a back entrance, because if it did it might have been a natural short-cut to use in going from Jacob's home to his mother's and brother's.

                              To my mind, on the whole the evidence suggests there was no back entrance. But there is an exchange in the Daily Telegraph report of the evidence of PC Alfred Long at the Eddowes inquest, which seems to suggest otherwise:
                              "[Coroner] What did you do when you found the piece of apron? - I at once searched the staircases leading to the buildings.
                              ...
                              [Coroner] When you went away did you leave anybody in charge? - Yes; the constable on the next beat - 190, H Division - but I do not know his name.
                              [Coroner] Did you give him instructions as to what he was to do? - I told him to keep observation on the dwelling house, and see if any one entered or left.
                              ...
                              The Foreman: Was there any possibility of a stranger escaping from the house? - Not from the front.
                              [Coroner] Did you not know about the back? - No, that was the first time I had been on duty there."

                              It was in Long's interest to emphasise that he had prevented anyone from leaving the building, because the suggestion was that he should have searched the whole building immediately, and not just the staircases. So if there was no back entrance, why should he reply "Not from the front", rather than just saying "No?"

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                              • #30
                                I'm surprised that there hasn't been more discussion of the contents of the book - particularly the new information about Jacob Levy.
                                -CGP-

                                It's possibly a sign that there aren't any contentious claims or speculations being presented as facts in the book. I haven't read anything which could be considered the author's opinion being turned into the final word.

                                Ironically, books based on a writer's personal interpretation of the case evidence will generate more discussion...and so will books that are haphazardly cobbled together.
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