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Jack The Ripper : Suspects, The Definitive Guide ( Williams, 2018)

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  • Jack The Ripper : Suspects, The Definitive Guide ( Williams, 2018)




    In the autumn of 1888, a serial killer known as Jack the Ripper stalked the East End of London. He was never identified, but hundreds of people were accused. Some were known to the authorities at the time, and others were named by later researchers. The truth about them, and the reasons why they came under suspicion, is often lost in a plethora of opinions and misinformation. For the first time, this book presents the evidence against 333 suspects. They include the publican who painted his dog, the first woman sentenced to the electric chair, the writer of the Red Flag, the man with a thousand convictions, Britain’s oldest Prime Minister, and many others. People from all walks of nineteenth century life, representing many different nationalities and professions. United by a link, however tenuous, to the most famous murderer in history.


    https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1986324699
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  • #2
    I'm not much interested in the "Best of the Year" book awards, but I suspected they'll be heading in Paul Williams's direction.

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    • #3
      That's a heck of a recommendation....I'm ordering it now.

      Thanks Paul !

      Done. Nice price for the Kindle (U.S.)
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      Contact Howard@jtrforums.com

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      • #4
        I'm still looking for a reference to the following regarding a familiar character from September 1888 :



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        • #5
          Found.....

          Debra Arif located the reference to Ludwig being picked up in Whitechapel as originally found by Martin Fido.....it was on The Forums, here :

          https://www.jtrforums.com/showthread...2948&styleid=2

          German researcher Frank Forster transcribed the entry for us :

          CHARLES GEORGE LUDWIG - brought -
          to Whitechapel by Police as lunatic
          11th March, 1897 Discharged is
          fir, 27th March [Register of Lunatics
          in Whitechapel Workhouse]
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          • #6
            Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
            Debra Arif located the reference to Ludwig being picked up in Whitechapel as originally found by Martin Fido.....it was on The Forums, here :

            https://www.jtrforums.com/showthread...2948&styleid=2

            German researcher Frank Forster transcribed the entry for us :

            CHARLES GEORGE LUDWIG - brought -
            to Whitechapel by Police as lunatic
            11th March, 1897 Discharged is
            fir, 27th March [Register of Lunatics
            in Whitechapel Workhouse]
            How, just to clarify; in the book, Williams writes that a Charles George Ludig was arrested in 1897 and gives a reference for that. The reference number leads to a note that says the information was taken from Martin Fido's asylum notes thread here on forums.
            Williams doesn't say that this is Ludwig.

            Williams makes similar observations with other suspects. In the Le Grande entry he references the marriage certificate I found and posted on forums where Grande said he father was named Peter and Williams picks out a Peter Grande from the census seemingly just because he is named Peter Grande, but Williams makes no attempt to research any further.
            Also with the Grande research, Williams seems to have missed altogether the research in to who exactly was the ex detective who claimed Grande was JTR. Unless I missed it in the book?

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            • #7
              Thanks for that, Debs....

              Paul is here on the boards now, hopefully he will see your remarks and respond.

              XXXXX
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              • #8
                Hi Debra,

                Many thanks for your comments. Very much appreciated. I mentioned the 1897 arrest, because of the possibility that it might be the same Charles Ludwig. There were lots of other records that might be relevant to individual suspects and, where I included them, I tried to make it clear that the connection was suggested rather than confirmed.

                Many of the sections, including the one on Le Grand, were condensed by me as the early drafts were far too long and I apologise for any omissions.

                The reference to Peter Grande was found in a promise to marriage. I hadnít then located any other records for him or a connection to Charles other than the name given on the certificate that you discovered. I have since followed up Peter's marriage. The bride was a widow called Mary Smith (maiden name Connor) and the ceremony was on 23 August 1842. Peter, like his father, Anthony, was a mariner.

                Happy to look at any other queries and to provide sources to anyone if the links in the electronic versions aren't working.

                Best wishes for the rest of the Easter weekend,

                Paul

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the reply, Paul.

                  I think you have produced a very useful book and congratulate you on correlating the huge amount of material on the suspects and referencing it all for us to visit the source for ourselves, that is an excellent idea.

                  There are a couple of little niggles I have on some entries but with such a huge undertaking there are bound to be a few inaccuracies creep in.

                  Good luck with the book.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks Debra.

                    I've been very encouraged by the response from those, like yourself, who have undertaken such detailed research into the subject. Hopefully this book will be a useful reference.

                    Please do let me have details of any inaccuracies. I would like to correct them for any future editions.

                    Best wishes,

                    Paul

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                    • #11
                      Paul

                      Ummm...well, you could change one thing for me.

                      Its Howard...not Harold.
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                      • #12
                        Sorry Howard. My apologies.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Paul Williams View Post
                          Please do let me have details of any inaccuracies. I would like to correct them for any future editions.
                          Hello Paul, and thanks for this excellent - and supremely readable! - book. I would point out, however, that the entry for Seweryn Klosowski might be a tad misleading, in that he didn't serve an apprenticeship at a medical clinic as such, but as an assistant to a small town's "Feldscher" or barber-surgeon. Likewise, when he moved to study in Warsaw, he paid his fees not as a student of a society of assistant surgeons, but - again - as an assistant feldscher. Unfortunately, the translation provided at his trial, and reproduced in HL Adam's book The Trial of George Chapman (your source), did not distinguish between surgeons and feldschers - probably because English doesn't really have an equivalent word for the latter.

                          This led to the mistaken belief that Klosowski had trained as a surgeon, which was not the case. Feldschers would cut hair, or apply leeches and poultices, but they weren't surgeons in the accepted sense of the word. It was probably because he'd trained as a feldscher that Klosowski set up as a hair-dresser when he came to England; unless there was a war on, I'd guess that feldschers probably did more hair-dressing than anything else, so he'd have had plenty of practice in that regard!

                          I'd refer you to Helena Wojtczak's recent book "Jack the Ripper at Last?", which has become the definitive Klosowski biography.

                          Thanks once again for this stimulating book, and I look forward to reading it properly in the next few days.
                          Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                          "Suche Nullen"
                          (F. Nietzsche)

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                          • #14
                            Paul:

                            No problem, amigo.
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                              Hello Paul, and thanks for this excellent - and supremely readable! - book. I would point out, however, that the entry for Seweryn Klosowski might be a tad misleading, in that he didn't serve an apprenticeship at a medical clinic as such, but as an assistant to a small town's "Feldscher" or barber-surgeon. Likewise, when he moved to study in Warsaw, he paid his fees not as a student of a society of assistant surgeons, but - again - as an assistant feldscher. Unfortunately, the translation provided at his trial, and reproduced in HL Adam's book The Trial of George Chapman (your source), did not distinguish between surgeons and feldschers - probably because English doesn't really have an equivalent word for the latter.

                              This led to the mistaken belief that Klosowski had trained as a surgeon, which was not the case. Feldschers would cut hair, or apply leeches and poultices, but they weren't surgeons in the accepted sense of the word. It was probably because he'd trained as a feldscher that Klosowski set up as a hair-dresser when he came to England; unless there was a war on, I'd guess that feldschers probably did more hair-dressing than anything else, so he'd have had plenty of practice in that regard!

                              I'd refer you to Helena Wojtczak's recent book "Jack the Ripper at Last?", which has become the definitive Klosowski biography.

                              Thanks once again for this stimulating book, and I look forward to reading it properly in the next few days.
                              Hi Sam

                              Many thanks for this. You're right. I did cite Helena a few times but that one slipped through.

                              Best wishes,

                              Paul

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