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  • Originally posted by Michael Banks

    I have to wave the white flag on that point Roger.
    The white flag is a rare sight in Ripperology, Michael. Sorry for bringing it up, but I thought your line of reasoning was somewhat unusual coming from a Druitt theorist, but maybe you've abandoned the drowned barrister?

    One odd thing about the Druitt theory is that Macnaghten's view of the case seems to have won out. Sir Basil Thomson and Sir John Fitzgerald Moylan would later repeat it as if it was the understood answer at the Yard. We don't see anything like that with Anderson's theory.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by R. J. Palmer

      The white flag is a rare sight in Ripperology, Michael. Sorry for bringing it up, but I thought your line of reasoning was somewhat unusual coming from a Druitt theorist, but maybe you've abandoned the drowned barrister?

      One odd thing about the Druitt theory is that Macnaghten's view of the case seems to have won out. Sir Basil Thomson and Sir John Fitzgerald Moylan would later repeat it as if it was the understood answer at the Yard. We don't see anything like that with Anderson's theory.
      I don’t know why the point didn’t register at the time Roger. At least you were on the ball (as ever)

      The Druitt theory certainly seems to have had more staying power than any suggestion of Kosminski being the ripper but that doesn’t prove anything of course. For 35 years I’ve seen nothing that dissuades me that Druitt is a suspect worthy of consideration although the very suggestion does appear to bother some. Maybe there’s more info still out there somewhere?
      Regards

      Michael🔎


      " When you eliminate the impossible whatever remains no matter how improbable......is probably a little bit boring "

      Comment


      • UPDATED ORSAM BLOG 29TH May 2023


        Just in case people missed it, Lord Orsam had several updates on Monday and a new book annouchment.

        Comment


        • Currently available - Lord Orsam

          Currently unavailable - Amazon

          Blimey, it must have sold out in a millisecond.

          It sounds fascinating, though.

          A book that every serious student of true crime should have on their shelf.

          Mr Albert Clanger NE Essex


          (I accept, cash, cheques and crates of fine wine.)

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Steve Blomer
            UPDATED ORSAM BLOG 29TH May 2023


            Just in case people missed it, Lord Orsam had several updates on Monday and a new book annouchment.
            Thanks for passing on the news. The updates are linked from here.

            I am intrigued by the new book, having enjoyed David Barrat's two previous true crime books. I am guessing it will deal with the question of time of death (as estimated from body temperature), though of course I may be wrong.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Chris Phillips

              Thanks for passing on the news. The updates are linked from here.

              I am intrigued by the new book, having enjoyed David Barrat's two previous true crime books. I am guessing it will deal with the question of time of death (as estimated from body temperature), though of course I may be wrong.
              Your guess was a good one:
              Attached Files

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Gary Barnett

                Your guess was a good one:
                Thanks. Of course the same question about the estimation of time of death is very relevant to Dr Phillips's opinion about Annie Chapman's time of death.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Chris Phillips

                  Thanks. Of course the same question about the estimation of time of death is very relevant to Dr Phillips's opinion about Annie Chapman's time of death.
                  Indeed. I suppose one of the questions there is what impact the nature of her injuries might have had on her body temperature. I wonder if David discusses any cases involving disembowelment.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Gary Barnett

                    Indeed. I suppose one of the questions there is what impact the nature of her injuries might have had on her body temperature. I wonder if David discusses any cases involving disembowelment.
                    Well, probably we should wait for the book, but while I'm sure you're right that disembowelment would have been an important source of uncertainty in the estimation of Chapman's time of death from temperature, it would have been only one of several, and from my reading a while ago I think there are more fundamental reasons why the margin of error for Phillips's estimate would have been very wide.

                    Comment



                    • I still haven’t finished The Islington Murder Mystery. I got as far as the first page of the New Bailey chapter and collapsed in hysterics. (Only a slight exaggeration).

                      It’s starts off rather pleasantly, the author describing a certain Mr Pratt walking along Fleet Street on a ‘warm and sunny day’ (‘the hottest of the year so far’ we are reliably informed) en route to the Old Bailey. Then comes the punch line: ‘Old is a misnomer because it was a new building…’ .

                      I’m glad I wasn’t drinking hot coffee when I read that.

                      When authors add this kind of background detail they are presumably hoping their readers will be impressed by the depth of their knowledge. What this author seems not to know, though, is that the Central Criminal Court is popularly known as the Old Bailey, not because of its age, but because that’s the name of the street where it is located. And the street was given that name because it was where an ancient outwork (bailey) in front of the London city wall was sited. The street was being referred to as la Ballie as early as 1287. The earliest reference to the ‘Old’ Bailey is from 1444-5 and it is thought by some that the ‘Old’ element may have been added to distinguish it from a later ‘Little’ Bailey. As early as 1554-5 there was a reference to le Justice Hall in Le Olde Bailie.

                      So, no misnomer. Just a failed attempt to impress.

                      Incidentally, I didn’t Google any of this, I looked it up in an Old Bookie that I have: Street-Names of the City of London by Eilert Ekwall (Oxford/Clarendon Press, 1954)

                      Comment


                      • How long before Lord O puts out an emergency update called Old Clanger or something equally hilarious?

                        Comment


                        • THE ISLINGTON MURDER MYSTERY

                          The book starts promisingly enough - with a classical quote.

                          Even a God cannot change the past.’

                          Agathon c. 400 BC


                          Blimey! The reader thinks. This guy is a classicist, I’m in for a real treat.

                          It turns out that none of Agathon’s works actually survived and the wording used by the author is one of several variant quotes used by subsequent writers. So it’s not exactly certain what Agathon said. The author might have been better advised to give this philosopher as his source.

                          One minute you're up, the next you're down. You love them, you hate them. You're sad, you're angry. But you can't question God.. why.. Even God can't change ...

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Gary Barnett
                            How long before Lord O puts out an emergency update called Old Clanger or something equally hilarious?
                            your wish is his command. lol. there has been an emergency update.

                            btw ive read the book, and Gary its very good. I highly recommend you finish it.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Abby Normal

                              your wish is his command. lol. there has been an emergency update.

                              btw ive read the book, and Gary its very good. I highly recommend you finish it.
                              Thanks, Abby. I’ll plug away at it. After reading the preface and the ‘Note on Currency’ I was already losing the will to live. I’ll address each section/chapter in order. Having read the approx 300 words of the Note on Currency, do you know how much £2 in 1915 is worth in today’s money?

                              Comment


                              • ISLINGTON MURDER MYSTERY

                                ‘Note on Currency’

                                The author tells us that, ‘Accurate currency conversion into today’s money is virtually impossible.’ And later, ‘There is no single conversion that works precisely …’

                                In that case, he could have just informed his readers that ‘ … £2 a week was a living wage for a worker with a family …’ in 1915 and left it at that. But this author’s motto is, ‘Why use a dozen words when 300 looks more impressive?’ So we are taken through some tedious mathematical calculations and presented with a range of values. £2 in 1915 is the equivalent in today’s money of:

                                £147.08 according to measuringworth.com - ‘but it does also give a range going much higher‘. I struggled with the maths on this one. The author tells us that using this calculator one penny in 1915 was the equivalent of 23 pence in today’s money and therefore one shilling (12 pence) equals £3.68 and one pound (20 shillings) equals £73.54**.

                                £240 according to the author’s assessment of the value of a living wage today (or rather when he wrote/updated the book - 2012/17 - obviously now out of date).

                                £816 based on the relative price of the Times newspaper between 1915 (1d) and ‘today’ (1.70). Of course, that’s also somewhat out of date, the cover price of the Times today is actually £2.50*** .The author presents us with a number of reasons why this method is unreliable, but forces us to work through the calculation anyway - possibly so that we are left with the impression that he is a Times reader (?). A classicist and a Times reader (but not a god*) We’re in for a treat!

                                I would recommend that anyone intending to read this books skips over the Note on Currency (life’s too short) - just remember that in 1915, £2 was a living wage (at least according to the author. To be on the safe side you might want to check that out).


                                *The author humbly admits this in the unnecessarily lengthy preface. I’ll get to that next.

                                ** I’ve been unable to reproduce these values on measuringworth.com.

                                *** Using the author’s methodology based on today’s actual Times cover price of £2.50, today’s equivalent of £2 in 1915 is approximately £1,200 but, as the author freely admits, his Times methodology is flawed. A waste of time really.

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