Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ripper Play Banned In Brighton 1930

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ripper Play Banned In Brighton 1930

    Interesting that in a time when society was considered to have had more restrictions and, not to forget, during the series of 1888-1889...Ripper themed plays were not banned.

    Fast forward to 1930........

    Lancashire Evening Post
    March 11, 1930
    *************

    To Join JTR Forums :
    Contact [email protected]

  • #2
    West Sussex Gazette
    March 20, 1930
    *************

    To Join JTR Forums :
    Contact [email protected]

    Comment


    • #3
      Andrew Miller’s melodrama ‘Jack the Ripper’ was first performed at the Brighton Grand Theatre on March 24, 1930. The play identifies the murderer as John Furnell, a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons suffering from homicidal mania. Below is the opening section of Scene Ten from the original script.

      Melville claimed to have researched the murders thoroughly before writing the play, consulting records at Scotland Yard, interviewing Wynne Baxter, and visiting the crime scenes. As Wynne Baxter died in 1920 we might discount this second claim, although the firm of Wynne Baxter has offices on the south coast, so Melville may have meant that he approached the firm itself. Alternatively, Melville may have contacted Baxter many years before the play was written.

      The play was originally banned by the Lord Chamberlain as ‘undesirable’: specifically, it was the inquest scene (Scene Six) that contained the offending material. This scene was cut by Miller and the Lord Chamberlain relented. Additionally, Baxter’s name was changed in the play to William Claxton

      The Templeman Library at the University of Kent at Canterbury holds three copies of the play previously owned by the Melville family. They also have a collection of playbills, theatre programmes, publicity material and press cuttings relating to the 'Jack the Ripper' play, including the musical score with parts for piano, cello bass, clarinet, drums, horn, trombone, trumpet, and second violin.

      In one of the files (UKC/MEL/BIO/A11/6:0599820) there is a communication from Andrew Melville’s wife, Rose Ralph, stating that her brother John Ralph, a Scotland Yard detective, was a constable in Whitechapel “during the Jack the Ripper Days” and provided useful information to Andrew Miller. Anyone know anything about John Ralph?

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks a lot for the scan, David....interesting stuff you've provided.

        There was a Constable Ralph...not certain it was the same man mentioned in your post....


        South London Press
        June 2, 1888
        ***********


        Lloyds' Weekly Newspaper
        September 12, 1886
        *****************

        To Join JTR Forums :
        Contact [email protected]

        Comment


        • #5
          West London Observer
          June 30, 1888
          ************




          The People
          August 12, 1888
          *************



          WANDSWORTH


          South London Press
          September 1, 1888
          ****************
          To Join JTR Forums :
          Contact [email protected]

          Comment


          • #6
            Again, if this is that man, a Constable Ralph's badge number was 634A
            According to one source, 'A' Division is now Whitehall.

            The People
            October 14,1888
            **************



            To Join JTR Forums :
            Contact [email protected]

            Comment


            • #7
              Wandsworth, again....in 1890

              South London Press
              September 20, 1890
              *****************
              To Join JTR Forums :
              Contact [email protected]

              Comment


              • #8
                Here's a Constable Ralph....but from Hammersmith or T Division

                West London Observer
                March 30, 1900
                **************

                To Join JTR Forums :
                Contact [email protected]

                Comment


                • #9
                  One from X Division, Kilburn Division

                  West London Observer
                  December 30, 1901
                  *****************
                  To Join JTR Forums :
                  Contact [email protected]

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks, How. Some interesting finds. Especially juicy is your discovery that Constable Ralph had a part to play in the Whitehall trunk case.


                    I've had another look at the notes I made when I visited the University of Kent about six years ago, but there is little to add. Rose Ralph (1881-1927) was an actress and singer. She went under the stage name Miss Rose Ralph It appears her older brother acted as a kind of consultant when Andrew Melville was writing his 'Jack the Ripper' play: the suggestion is that he supplied the playwright with 'insider' or privileged information of some kind. Melville later married the nurse who had cared for his dying wife.


                    I've checked my notes, and Melville does actually claim that he interviewed Wynne Baxter in person to obtain details of the inquests on the Ripper victims. Scene Twelve of the play deals with the Stride inquest.


                    Attached is a photograph of Andrew Melville.


                    Click image for larger version

Name:	M575953.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	70.3 KB
ID:	561076

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Nice photo, David....thanks.


                      Dundee Evening Telegraph
                      November 19, 1930
                      *****************



                      To Join JTR Forums :
                      Contact [email protected]

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The Grand Theatre in North Road, Brighton had a somewhat chequered carer itself...I was born and brought up in Brighton and the upper part of North Road isn't/wasn't exactly where I'd expect to see a successful theatre or cinema...see http://www.arthurlloyd.co.uk/Brighto...reBrighton.htm

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Melville was a great showman and publicist. Huge posters were put up around Brighton which read, "WOMEN BEWARE! Brighton Running with Blood!".


                          Here is part of the theatre programme:


                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X