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Reynolds News, Sunday 29 October 1950

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  • AP Wolf
    replied
    Good point, Gary, but I've always been of the opinion that we still do not have an exact tally of the victims of the Whitechapel Murderer, and my own researches in that area led me to be very wary of ascribing other murders in the years surrounding 1888 to the same killer, and I would add that even some of the so-called victims from 1888 might not fit the remit. We know that both Martha Tabram and Elizabeth Stride as victims of the same killer is still a very disputed argument, so wherever you turn in this bed of nettles you are going to get stung! I think it fair to say that Robertson not only gave her a name, but perhaps more importantly gave the basic idea credence in the 20th Century.

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    AP,

    The idea that there was an 1887 victim goes back to the 19th century, doesn’t it? So Robertson merely gave her a name.

    Gary

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  • AP Wolf
    replied
    What is of interest as well is that the story of the 'Lynch of Galway', which Terence Robertson elaborated on between the years of 1949 and 1952, was actually a piece of romantic fiction written by the Reverend Edward Margin in 1807, that then went on to become accepted as genuine history, despite the author protesting that he had made it all up! I think this shows Robertson's interest in the story, in that it made him aware that one could invent a character like 'Fairy Fay', weave a clever story and plot around that character, and hey presto Fairy Fay marches out of fiction to become fact! I haven't seen the 'A to Z' in years but I would assume Fairy Fay occupies a factual place in there somewhere? Of interest as well is that many of the Lynch family of Galway were named 'Fay', both as a surname and first name, and they seemed to have had a bookmakers firm called Fay for many years until quite recently, so that could well explain the horse called 'Fairy Fay', as a lot of Irish bookmakers were race horse owners?

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  • AP Wolf
    replied
    Originally posted by Howard Brown View Post
    A.P. ...do you think it more likely that Robertson used the name of the horse, Fairy Fay, that Gary found in 1948 than this F. Fay person ?
    I think it might have been a combination of both, How, in that the horse probably firstly inspired the name, but then the amateur drama, which had obviously caught his eye shortly after, supplied the link, with the author F.Fay, to the murderous concoction which he went on to produce for the Reynold's News.

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    Originally posted by AP Wolf View Post
    Very good chaps, but my goodness you aint seen nothing yet! He were a proper tinker! I like the horse racing angle, Gary, as part of my book involves the stud of Boyd Rochfort's stables, very famous Irish trainer who ran horses for the Crown and the Maharajah of Cooch Behar, and I suspect Fairy Fay was one of his nags, amongst many others.
    He sounds a fascinating character, AP!

    Bad boys are always more interesting than good’uns.

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    A.P. ...do you think it more likely that Robertson used the name of the horse, Fairy Fay, that Gary found in 1948 than this F. Fay person ?

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  • Chris G.
    replied
    Originally posted by AP Wolf View Post
    Very good chaps, but my goodness you aint seen nothing yet! He were a proper tinker! I like the horse racing angle, Gary, as part of my book involves the stud of Boyd Rochfort's stables, very famous Irish trainer who ran horses for the Crown and the Maharajah of Cooch Behar, and I suspect Fairy Fay was one of his nags, amongst many others.
    I have had some correspondence with a Canadian historian on the matter of Mr. Harold Terence Robertson. That historian remarked to me that Robertson "caused trouble wherever he went." I should say that is pretty much true.

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  • AP Wolf
    replied
    Very good chaps, but my goodness you aint seen nothing yet! He were a proper tinker! I like the horse racing angle, Gary, as part of my book involves the stud of Boyd Rochfort's stables, very famous Irish trainer who ran horses for the Crown and the Maharajah of Cooch Behar, and I suspect Fairy Fay was one of his nags, amongst many others.

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Damn ! Good one Gary.....

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    This is from the Belfast Telegraph of 16th October, 1948.
    Attached Files

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  • Gary Barnett
    replied
    I believe that at the time there was a racehorse named Fairy Fay. Was Robertson the sort of person who would be more familiar with provincial Irish Am Dram than he would the gee-gees?

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    By the way, A.P.....I came across some of the material you'll probably use in your project. I'll just say that Robertson appears to have been a reckless man.

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Northern Whig
    January 11, 1955
    ********************



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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    ...nor in this one, either

    Cornish Guardian
    August 13, 1953
    *********************

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  • Howard Brown
    replied
    Robertson sure didn't make any friends in this report..........

    The Scotsman
    July 11, 1949
    ****************


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