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Victorian newspapers are incorrectly portrayed in films

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  • Victorian newspapers are incorrectly portrayed in films

    https://twitter.com/i/moments/935239040621793280

    Bob Nicholson, a historian, noticed that the film featured an inaccurate representation of the era's newsprint.

    Chris George located this story.
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  • #2
    That's quite a howler!
    Kind regards, Sam Flynn

    "Suche Nullen"
    (F. Nietzsche)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
      That's quite a howler!
      Well, yes and no. If they showed what Victorian newspapers actually looked like, a modern audience might not recognize it as a newspaper or realize why the news stories were sensational. You don't get the big headline.

      Incidentally, this is similar to my dislike of the use of the word "tabloid" to describe newspapers of Jack the Ripper's day -- the tabloid didn't come into fashion until the 20th century.

      But Jack DID read period newspapers with big bloody headlines as the following graphic clearly proves!

      Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
      https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

      Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
      Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

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      • #4
        "Freddie Starr ate my hansom."

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        • #5
          Chris is right, albeit the tabloid newspaper wasn't far away at the time of the Ripper murders. From Wikipedia:

          "The word "tabloid" comes from the name given by the London-based pharmaceutical company Burroughs Wellcome & Co. to the compressed tablets they marketed as "Tabloid" pills in the late 1880s. The connotation of tabloid was soon applied to other small compressed items. A 1902 item in London's Westminster Gazette noted, "The proprietor intends to give in tabloid form all the news printed by other journals." Thus "tabloid journalism" in 1901 originally meant a paper that condensed stories into a simplified, easily absorbed format. The term preceded the 1918 reference to smaller sheet newspapers that contained the condensed stories"
          Kind regards, Sam Flynn

          "Suche Nullen"
          (F. Nietzsche)

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks, Sam!
            Christopher T. George, Lyricist & Co-Author, "Jack the Musical"
            https://www.facebook.com/JackTheMusical/ Hear sample song at https://tinyurl.com/y8h4envx.

            Organizer, RipperCon #JacktheRipper-#True Crime Conferences, April 2016 and 2018.
            Hear RipperCon 2016 & 2018 talks at http://www.casebook.org/podcast/.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
              Chris is right, albeit the tabloid newspaper wasn't far away at the time of the Ripper murders. From Wikipedia:

              "The word "tabloid" comes from the name given by the London-based pharmaceutical company Burroughs Wellcome & Co. to the compressed tablets they marketed as "Tabloid" pills in the late 1880s. The connotation of tabloid was soon applied to other small compressed items. A 1902 item in London's Westminster Gazette noted, "The proprietor intends to give in tabloid form all the news printed by other journals." Thus "tabloid journalism" in 1901 originally meant a paper that condensed stories into a simplified, easily absorbed format. The term preceded the 1918 reference to smaller sheet newspapers that contained the condensed stories"
              "I have read about my latest in the tabloids."

              Whoops!

              Love,

              Caz
              X
              I wish I were two puppies then I could play together - Storm Petersen

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Caroline Brown View Post
                "I have read about my latest in the tabloids."
                If only!
                Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                "Suche Nullen"
                (F. Nietzsche)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Caroline Brown View Post
                  "I have read about my latest in the tabloids."
                  "Victoria, Victoria, the Queen of the Fleet.
                  Who knows, perhaps one day I will send her a tweet"
                  Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                  "Suche Nullen"
                  (F. Nietzsche)

                  Comment

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