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What Did the PC on the Beat Think About JTR?

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  • What Did the PC on the Beat Think About JTR?

    The thoughts of Abberline, Anderson, and many other authorities of the day are well-documented, but what do you think the PC on the beat thought about the Whitechapel Murders?
    20
    He resented the attention and criticism heaped on the police.
    10.00%
    2
    He didn't much care so long as it wasn't 'decent citizens' being killed.
    5.00%
    1
    He took JTR personally and spent his free time on the hunt.
    0.00%
    0
    He imagined himself to be the one to capture him.
    20.00%
    4
    He was terrified at the possibility of having to confront JTR alone.
    40.00%
    8
    He was fatalistic about being able to stop him.
    10.00%
    2
    He welcomed the heat that JTR put on his clueless supervisors higher up.
    5.00%
    1
    He welcomed the attention brought to the slum area and awful conditions.
    0.00%
    0
    He welcomed the newfound 'hero' status and admiration observed by the east enders.
    0.00%
    0
    He was frustrated that his ideas and suggestions were dismissed by his superiors.
    10.00%
    2

  • #2
    Tim.......Probably a bit of all of the possibilities you mention. Beneath the necessary chest-puffing by each individual cop,they had to be more than a little afraid. Only a whistle ( imagine !! ) to communicate with. They had to be on edge,big time.
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    • #3
      Time to bump up this ancient thread...
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      • #4
        This is an interesting poll, esp when looking at the results as it would seem people agree with nearly all of them.

        I think it was probably a number of these feelings that the police on the beat had...it all depends on their character, and of course the context of policing at the time, I mean were they 'used' to dealing with murder and terrible crimes like rape and assault, or were they too blase and just waitied to get hold of the next drunk and throw him in the cells.

        Some must have been really bored and wanted the excitement of uncertainty, or becoming the hero and catching him, Im sure they all discussed what they would do if they met the Ripper, whether it was to fight or run away...

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        • #5
          He was thinking, "Who the bloody hell is he?"

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          • #6
            It says I've already voted, for the life of me I can't remember which though. lol

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            • #7
              I remember what I felt, but didn't vote until just now 6 years after the poll was first brought up.

              I think the average policeman was as worried as I did then in 2003...after all they were facing someone, if cornered, who would have had no choice but to use that blade if running away was not an option. He may have been indifferent to the thought of being interrupted as well....

              I don't scare that easily...but in this situation that the East End police were in...I would be without the slightest doubt or hesitation to say so openly...and maybe even a lot...especially on a beat in the drizzle at 2 AM...all by myself.
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              • #8
                I voted fear of meeting Jack alone, I know I would of felt a little on edge, but some of the other responses are just as thought provoking.

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                • #9
                  Would the police officers have not been encouraged by their superiors who would have explained what they 'thought' they were dealing with, I mean if a serial killer was on the loose in London today, how would they encourage the street plods to go out there all night and day and catch this person (yes I know they have more than a whistle nowadays and normally patrol in 2's, but I think some would still need convincing to go out there)...

                  My point being those that did go out back in 1888 were extremely brave, or felt they had no choice cause they would be sacked.

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                  • #10
                    Bell:


                    Unless the policeman was a newcomer to the Force at the time of the Nichols murder...as an example, the chances are that they were physically capable men...being a little larger than the average British male....and a toot on the whistle away from backup from brother officers.

                    I'd be equally leery of traipsing down Dorset Street by myself as an Officer, with or without JTR still on the loose....but I would fulfill my duties as every man on the force would do...without thinking twice.

                    Its only the mental image of what could happen if coming upon a killer who took organs and savagely mutilated women in the open that would make me fearful...and think twice.
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                    • #11
                      If he was only doing that to women tho, would they think they were 'ok' to a point?

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                      • #12
                        Bell:

                        The chances are that when Cadosch heard a noise in the backyard of 29 Hanbury,that was Saucy Jack and Chapman.

                        If Cadosch had stuck his head over the fence, I for one am pretty convinced Cadosch would have been assaulted,if not worse.

                        The police had to take into consideration something a lot of us still don't take into consideration...and that is "armed and dangerous" is a redundancy... Armed is dangerous and anyone who annihilates women out in the open with a weapon is a threat to man,woman and child alike....and of course a policeman coming up upon an act of madness with no prior knowledge of a murder in progress.
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                        • #13
                          I see what you mean How, do you know why the police were not issued with some sort of defensive weapon? If the police were based on the 'army' so to speak...should they not have been given something?

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                          • #14
                            Bell:

                            Someone more well versed with Met & City police protocol would have an answer for that. I have heard that policemen or rather, some police personnel did carry sidearms...but at present can't dig up conclusive evidence for you.

                            Maybe Monty or Mr. Begg...or anyone from the U.K. perhaps.
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                            • #15
                              I know some early firearms were specifically developed for crowd control and the like, and pepper-box type pistols could be easily carried

                              ...but I think the policeman was quite strictly regulated in what he carried - which would probably consist of his lamp, truncheon, rattle/whistle - and his lunch

                              PS that is obviously the "beat" policeman - not the mounted guys with the big swords

                              I'm sure customs and excise were armed, especially for boarding boats

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