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Lodging House Deputy's rooms?

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  • Lodging House Deputy's rooms?

    I get the sense that lodging house deputies live in very accessible rooms or spaces. A witness last saw Stride cleaning a deputy's room. Mrs. Prater said she could often see light through the partition on her way upstairs to No. 20 Miller's Court, and No. 14 Miller's Court (room of the deputy, Maxwell) sat on that side of the partition, opposite MJK's room. So No. 14 would seem to be open to the staircase that the upstairs lodgers would traverse. Other accounts describe deputies being awoken in the night, without reference to knocking on room doors, etc. So did deputies live within or adjacent to common rooms? Was there something like a dutch door that was often left open at top? Most of what I'm reading is suggestive, not explicit.

    If anyone has an old photograph, a floorplan, or even photos of a surviving lodging house interior, it would really help. I'd welcome perspectives on how deputies were situated, whatever that may be.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Justin Clement View Post
    I get the sense that lodging house deputies live in very accessible rooms or spaces. A witness last saw Stride cleaning a deputy's room. Mrs. Prater said she could often see light through the partition on her way upstairs to No. 20 Miller's Court, and No. 14 Miller's Court (room of the deputy, Maxwell) sat on that side of the partition, opposite MJK's room. So No. 14 would seem to be open to the staircase that the upstairs lodgers would traverse. Other accounts describe deputies being awoken in the night, without reference to knocking on room doors, etc. So did deputies live within or adjacent to common rooms? Was there something like a dutch door that was often left open at top? Most of what I'm reading is suggestive, not explicit.

    If anyone has an old photograph, a floorplan, or even photos of a surviving lodging house interior, it would really help. I'd welcome perspectives on how deputies were situated, whatever that may be.
    Hi Justin,

    I think Maxwell lived at 14, Dorset Street rather than 14, Millerís Court.

    Gary

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    • #3
      Justin:

      I believe that the lodging house deputies, husband and wife Henry & Maria Moore, lived on the premises at 35 Dorset ( Crossingham's ) at the time of the Mary Ann Austin murder, in 1901.

      I know you're looking for examples between 1888 and 1891....but that's an example of deputies living on the premises.
      To Join JTR Forums, Contact :
      Howard@jtrforums.com

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Gary Barnett View Post
        Hi Justin,

        I think Maxwell lived at 14, Dorset Street rather than 14, Millerís Court.

        Gary
        Well, that makes so much more sense! I always wondered why Mrs. Maxwell didn't get grilled more during the inquest. Thanks for the clarification. Very much appreciated!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Justin Clement View Post
          ...... and No. 14 Miller's Court (room of the deputy, Maxwell) sat on that side of the partition, opposite MJK's room. So No. 14 would seem to be open to the staircase that the upstairs lodgers would traverse.....

          For what it's worth, as Kelly occupied the ground floor room at the back of No.26, the room opposite would be the front room which faced Dorset St., and that had been converted into a storage room for wheelbarrows. Commonly referred to as 'the shed', Prater lived in the room above the shed.
          Regards, Jon S.
          "
          The theory that the murderer is a lunatic is dispelled by the opinion given to the police by an expert in the treatment of lunacy patients......."If he's insane
          " observed the medical authority, "he's a good deal sharper than those who are not".
          Reynolds Newspaper, 4 Nov. 1888.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Wicker Man View Post
            For what it's worth, as Kelly occupied the ground floor room at the back of No.26, the room opposite would be the front room which faced Dorset St., and that had been converted into a storage room for wheelbarrows. Commonly referred to as 'the shed', Prater lived in the room above the shed.
            Yeah... I thought that room might be subdivided, given the article on 14 Miller's Court by Orsam. If the room was subdivided on the ground floor and not in the same spot on the other floors, it wouldn't show up on the fire insurance map. Perhaps that subdivision happened subsequent to 1888, but before 1909.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Justin Clement View Post
              Yeah... I thought that room might be subdivided, given the article on 14 Miller's Court by Orsam. If the room was subdivided on the ground floor and not in the same spot on the other floors, it wouldn't show up on the fire insurance map. Perhaps that subdivision happened subsequent to 1888, but before 1909.
              When you say "that room", do you mean No.13 where Kelly lived?
              That room was cut off internally from the rest of the house, yes, but all internal walls are not shown in residential houses on the Fire Insurance maps. only load-bearing walls.
              Regards, Jon S.
              "
              The theory that the murderer is a lunatic is dispelled by the opinion given to the police by an expert in the treatment of lunacy patients......."If he's insane
              " observed the medical authority, "he's a good deal sharper than those who are not".
              Reynolds Newspaper, 4 Nov. 1888.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Wicker Man View Post
                When you say "that room", do you mean No.13 where Kelly lived?
                No, I mean, I thought "the shed" might be subdivided. It appears to be the case by 1909.

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